WD-40 Test

Discussion in 'Shooting Accessories' started by Zonie, Jul 12, 2019.

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  1. Aug 3, 2019 #141

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    Being a locksmith perhaps you can tell me if I was right or wrong?

    Earlier in this topic I mentioned that the only thing that has happened to the WD-40 since I put a bunch of it into a percussion cap tin lid is that it turned into basically something I would say looks and flows about like 30 or 40 weight motor oil.
    I assumed putting 30 or 40 weight motor oil into a tumbler lock could cause the tumblers from moving freely so, the lock wouldn't work.
    Was this a correct assumption?
     
  2. Aug 4, 2019 #142

    Brent

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    WD40 will not gum up a lock, but it will hold dust and THAT will gum up a lock, so most people use dry, silicone or teflon-based lubricants in locks these days. But in a pinch WD40 will open up a sticky lock too.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2019 #143

    45man

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    If you spray anything on a spark plug wire, use silicone. Anything else will stick so you need pliers to remove the wire from the spark plug. Most times it will be ruined.
     
  4. Aug 4, 2019 #144

    goodshot

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    we liked Poxy Lube for locks, a spray teflon that would blast out crap and leave teflon
     
  5. Aug 4, 2019 #145

    Carbon 6

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    A lot depends on the type of lock, usage, and location. I've used it to free up an old padlock, but had it be useless on a door lock. It will also freeze up a lock in below zero weather. The old formula WD-40, I haven't used the new formula on a lock as I have better options.
    IMO, if a lock get's to the point where it needs WD-40 to make it work, It's probably not long for this world anyway. Time to think about replacing it.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2019 #146

    45man

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    It will open a lock with water or ice but when it hardens, the tumblers will lock up tight. Best is graphite.
    One time a friend called when his neighbor left her keys in the house and her baby was inside. I took tools and it was a long time until I got the door open. Forget the TV junk with 2 seconds to open a lock. It can take an hour to open. I was in the house before they wanted to break a window.
    The relieve of the lady was my payment. I did not want a dime. She will never forget me. To shed tears over problems is my life.
    Believe what you will but a can of WD-40 should be set down range to shoot.
     
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  7. Aug 4, 2019 #147

    45man

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    I use LPS 3 in my BP guns. Barricade goes on every other gun. Rig grease will store a gun forever.
    3 in 1 will gum as will Singer sewing machine oil. I even had Rem oil gum to stop the bolt stop on a Ruger Mark.
     
  8. Aug 4, 2019 #148

    OldRust

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    Yes sir, I would definitely need a nap after giving that energetic presentation. Thanks
     
  9. Aug 5, 2019 #149

    goodshot

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    He's always that way, and he has a lot of experience in autos, take his info and weigh it for yourself, I know I do and have learned a lot.
     
  10. Oct 24, 2019 #150

    Zonie

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    Back on July 12 I started this topic about testing WD 40 to see if it would turn into some gummy like substance that would cause problems if it was used on a gun.

    At the time, after 5 days in the hot Arizona sunshine with temperatures up to 114°F it had turned into something that was basically about like 30 weight motor oil.

    Now, over 3 months later it has continued to thicken. It is still a fluid like oil but I'd guess its more like 90 weight oil that's used in standard transmissions and differentials. It is still not "gummy" but I can see where it could definitely cause a problem with key locks by causing the little tumbler pins that the key pushes on, to stop moving freely.
     
  11. Oct 25, 2019 #151

    Oldbear63

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    This begs another of my curiosities:
    If drug-store medical grade mineral oil is just highly purified petroleum oil then why wouldn't we use it as a fine lubricant?

    I did have a lengthy conversation with a Japanese antique sword technician/repairer and he was using this as a protectant for these extremely valuable swords. He did caution that every few years you should clean the oil off and re-apply as the oil residue gets gummy.

    Or we could just go on-line to buy repackaged drug-store mineral oil at exorbitant prices for use as a watch and lock lubricant.
     
  12. Oct 25, 2019 #152

    Carbon 6

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    Now imagine you are a "once a year deer hunter".(12 months)
    and the temperature is low.(below freezing).

    WD-4 Get A Bout It. :D
     
  13. Oct 25, 2019 #153

    Sam squanch

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    Know anyone who uses it on their arthritis? Used to know some old timers who swore by it,they permanently smelled like w d 40!
     
  14. Oct 25, 2019 #154

    SDSmlf

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    I use WD40 as a water displacer and short term surface protector. Would not consider it for a lubricant in a mechanical device. Have seen the stuff thicken up in cold weather (below 10°F) to the point where a firing pin on a modern gun would not move until warmed up. Many better products out there.

    I live in the heat and humidity of North Carolina, and find that if I have a clean bore/surface covered with WD40 and it is not disturbed (fingerprints for example) I do not have a corrosion or rust issue. I store for the first day or two after cleaning muzzle down and have experienced no ‘oil issues’. Don’t wipe, just load and shoot. Not properly cleaned, doesn’t matter what I use, it is going to rust.
     
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  15. Oct 25, 2019 #155

    GregLaRoche

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    Before WD40 became so popular CRC was widely used in the marine industry. Seemed to work better against corrosion.

    Several years ago I read an article that stated that WD40 was made up of basically mineral spirits with a very small percentage of oils.

    I’ve since started using deodorized paint thinner with a little bit oil added to it. I put it in a spray bottle and keep it in my shop for a number of uses where I would have used WD40 before. I’ve been saving a lot of money. I still have a can or two around. That straw can come in handy.

    For guns I’m a Ballistol fan. I like the slight residue it leaves behind. The spray can is a lot thinner than the normal, but sometimes that can be good. I’ve tried putting the regular in a spray bottle, but it was too viscous to work. I’ve thought about adding some paint thinner, but for now I just buy the cans.
     
  16. Oct 25, 2019 #156

    Alice1885

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    Anyone ever try Fluidfilm ? It is a lanolin based spray. I sprayed some on some sheet steel that has been laying out in the weather for better than a year and it still isn't rusting and really repels water.
    Been thinkin bout using on longrifles and see how it works out.
    Gordy
     
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  17. Oct 25, 2019 #157

    Carbon 6

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    Yep! Works great for long term storage and very rainy conditions. Most people are use to protectants that basically
    evaporate, fluid film doesn't. For normal use, I spray it on and wipe it off leaving a thin coat. Don't forget to shake the can, it has a marble in it like spray paint.
     
  18. Oct 25, 2019 #158

    SDSmlf

    SDSmlf

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    Fluid Film may work and is said to be lanolin based, but unless the ‘lanolin’ they use is made from petroleum, you wouldn’t know it from their MSDS.
    upload_2019-10-25_9-57-8.png
     
  19. Oct 25, 2019 #159

    josie wales

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    I am a believer in FF! I been using it on my guns for years now and no sign of rust. Also makes a good hand conditioner if you like the smell of a sheep barn. It drives the country girls crazy much as English Leather did years ago.
     
  20. Oct 26, 2019 #160

    RonRC

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    I have found Fluid Film to be an excellent protective and preservative. It does have a tendency to build up a long lasting film that reminds me of Brylcream (A little dab will do ya!), giving a nice sheen at first, but becoming cloudy with time.
    Now, where did I put that Brylcream?
     

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