Granddaddy of Production Muzzleloaders?

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smo

70 Cal.
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My first long gun muzzleloader was a Investarms.50 Hawken percussion gun… Somewhere around 1977-78.

I had own a bp revolver prior too that..

It wasn’t long until had a weak moment and joined the unmentionable crowd…( before they were known as unmentionables😉)

I bought a H&R Huntsman….
It was a single shot shot gun identifying as a .45 cal muzzleloader rifle …🤣🥴

Shortly after that came a long list of TC Hawken & Renegades..

I still own a couple of TC’s and have always found them too be a decent hunting guns for S E Whitetail.
 

Russ T Frizzen

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Navy Arms really started the whole repro thing off about 1960 on cusp of the CW Centennial. I'd say TC for the hunting crowd, and Dixie is not really a mfgr. but an importer and seller. Hatfield very limited to niche crowd, Numrich also limited, and P-H another great but niche product. Love 'em all, anyway! Good thread.
Turner started Dixie Gun Works in 1954, but was actually in business much earlier. It's true that Dixie didn't make their guns, but neither did Navy Arms. Turner was a true southern gentleman and often answered the phone himself. I remember his early catalog. It was basically a few pages on cheap paper. But it was a muzzleloader crazy kid's dreambook.
 

bubba.50

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I think the "granddaddy" was the year 1976.
The Bi-Centennial,, The economy was booming, work was plentiful, all kinds of retro spirits where involved in that time period.
They all jumped on the band wagon

That was a regular modern day "Shining Time" warn't it?
 
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Turner started Dixie Gun Works in 1954, but was actually in business much earlier. It's true that Dixie didn't make their guns, but neither did Navy Arms. Turner was a true southern gentleman and often answered the phone himself. I remember his early catalog. It was basically a few pages on cheap paper. But it was a muzzleloader crazy kid's dreambook.
Many years ago, an elderly friend gave me his reloading equipment and supplies.Lots of classic stuff from the 50s. Among the stash were two of those hair crimper molds for round balls, .720" and .375". I bet Turner Kikland cherried those molds himself. I've shot a good many balls from the .720" one.
 
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I'm talking about guns that have generally been sold "over the counter" and not semi-production special order types. The one, or ones, that have or had the greatest influence in getting the public into shooting and/or hunting with firearms of "primitive" function.

Manufacturers that come to mind;

Thomson Center
Lyman
Navy Arms
Dixie Gunworks
Uberti
Hatfield
Numrich
Parker Hale
And a host of others

So, "Who's your Granddaddy?"

Oh, my pick is Thompson Center's Hawken model figuring volume sold and the fact is was my first.
Invest Arms and Traditions come to my mind
 
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T/C always fetched a premium price but was solid quality. CVA was early
and accurate. Still love them. Newer "Black Chrome CVA" is precision.
CVA-JUKAR is tied up with Bergarra barrels. Maker of famous
sniper rifle barrels and Remington copies of the 700 sniper. While I tote
an Investarms Hawken style carbine in the woods, the CVA black chrome
is a tack driver which has won in competition shoots. Of course the Industry
is in flux and changing--what was made then is often no longer available.
The true Granddads of this historical sport were the Custom makers who
cranked out extra guns and rifles as low speed manufacturers-makers.
Many unknown and un-remembered today, but represented in those
many guns & rifles we puzzle over on this forum.
 
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People come to Muzzleloaders thru a couple avenues; re-enactors need them for impressions, some guys got into ML guns to hunt or extend hunting season, some just liked "old guns" and got in from there. It's kind of funny especially with Civil War enactors, they're doing a re-created 'battle' from a specific date and worry that their musket's lockplate doesn't have the "correct" date for that exact event! As if the spectators know or care.
 

Willy

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My first long gun muzzleloader came after a Uberti First Model Dragoon and was Lyman Great Plains 54 caplock kit. I browned the metal and lightly stained the stock. After a couple of years, someone offered me about twice what I had in it and I sold it. Then I got my Navy Arms/Pietta 12 gauge double which I've kept for the last 40 years. Along the way I was given a CVA 45 Kentucky with the drum broken off. I took the barrel into work, drilled and tapped for a new drum I ordered from Dixie and it shot fine. I gave that one to my brother who in turn gave it to his son. When I gave it to my brother, I told him that he'll probably need it when folks figure out those new fangled metallic cartridge guns are just a passing fad.
 
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My first was a Numrich Arms and it was borrowed from a friend. Bought a CVA in the late 70's and still have it. Restocked and put a better lock in years ago. A real good shooter.
 
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