Granddaddy of Production Muzzleloaders?

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I'm talking about guns that have generally been sold "over the counter" and not semi-production special order types. The one, or ones, that have or had the greatest influence in getting the public into shooting and/or hunting with firearms of "primitive" function.

Manufacturers that come to mind;

Thomson Center
Lyman
Navy Arms
Dixie Gunworks
Uberti
Hatfield
Numrich
Parker Hale
And a host of others

So, "Who's your Granddaddy?"

Oh, my pick is Thompson Center's Hawken model figuring volume sold and the fact is was my first.
 

Notchy Bob

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I believe Turner Kirkland's .40 caliber "New Dixie Squirrel Rifle," introduced in the 1950's, was the first real production made modern muzzleloader. Up to that point, people were shooting intact or cobbled-together originals, for the most part. I don't remember what year it was introduced, but the New Dixie Squirrel Rifle was probably close to 20 years ahead of the T/C Hawken. However, T/C's timing, in introducing their Hawken, was very good. I think the T/C Hawken probably had the greatest influence on modern muzzleloading, but the New Dixie Squirrel Rifle blazed the trail. It was the "grand-daddy."

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 
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I believe Turner Kirkland's .40 caliber "New Dixie Squirrel Rifle," introduced in the 1950's, was the first real production made modern muzzleloader. Up to that point, people were shooting intact or cobbled-together originals, for the most part. I don't remember what year it was introduced, but the New Dixie Squirrel Rifle was probably close to 20 years ahead of the T/C Hawken. However, T/C's timing, in introducing their Hawken, was very good. I think the T/C Hawken probably had the greatest influence on modern muzzleloading, but the New Dixie Squirrel Rifle blazed the trail. It was the "grand-daddy."

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
The one I have is the first year of production on the Kirkland .40s which is 1956, can't call it a top-notch gun but it does serve the purpose.
 

Rock Home Isle

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I think the "granddaddy" was the year 1976.
The Bi-Centennial,, The economy was booming, work was plentiful, all kinds of retro spirits where involved in that time period.
They all jumped on the band wagon
I remember going to the 4th of July Parade and seeing the Mountain Men from the Masonville, Buckhorn Skinners Muzzleloading Club, walking in the parade, full garb, shooting blank loads out if their muzzleloaders, up in the air. It left quite the impression on my young mind…
 
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Turner Kirkland, I feel, had the most influence in the late 50's - early 60's. Even in those days, the Dixie catalog provided enough info (and encouragement) to whet one's interest. His were the first "kits" that I personally remember seeing and, even if a guy couldn't afford an entire kit, buying one or two parts at a time enabled you to eventually make something that would shoot. Lots of good books,

Also, Kirkland had access to a wide variety of parts not available elsewhere from his connections in Europe. It was a happy time.

Later, commercial manufacturers provided good quality (if not historically accurate) M/L's that looked good, shot good, and were reliable.

Also available was an assortment of modern "trade guns" made for sale to "natives" in various places where modern firearms were outlawed. Many of us bought them, sometimes at really low cost as our first muzzleloaders. Spanish, Belgian, or ? mostly you got what you paid for ...availability didn't last very long.
 
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CVA/Jukar being sold in the large retail chains made them the grand daddy around here. Seems I remember K Marts, WalMarts and other big chains carrying them long before other brands were showing up and I'm sure they sold a ton of them. The others were many years later, specialty shops or mail order.
 

Loyalist Dave

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I'm talking about guns that have generally been sold "over the counter" and not semi-production special order types. The one, or ones, that have or had the greatest influence in getting the public into shooting and/or hunting with firearms of "primitive" function.

Manufacturers that come to mind;

Thomson Center
Lyman
Navy Arms
Dixie Gunworks
Uberti
Hatfield
Numrich
Parker Hale
And a host of others

So, "Who's your Granddaddy?"

Oh, my pick is Thompson Center's Hawken model figuring volume sold and the fact is was my first.

There are less than one thinks...,

How many "manufactured" compared to how many ordered them from a company and had their name stamped upon them?

Pedersoli makes their guns
Pietta makes theirs
So did Armi San Marco
Thompson Center did
Lyman did for a while, but I think their rifles are also now available from the manufacturer under other brand names ??
I know the Dixie Gunworks Tennessee Rifle was proprietary to them..., but their other guns, ???
Parker Hale did, I think,
Hatfield did at first

My CVA's were ordered from companies in Spain, by CVA, and sold here. They are now found here with other brand names upon them.
My buddy's Hatfield is a Frontier from Pedersoli, ordered with the Hatfield name and sold by them
My DGW Tennessee rifle I've never seen offered by anybody else but was made by Miroku, but the Jap Bess by Miroku was available from Navy Arms and DGW

LD
 

desi23

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As several have said Turner Kirkland was the first to sell a modern mass produced muzzle loader with his Belgian made rifles in the 1950's. Soon followed by the Civil War Centennial which brought the reproduction cap & ball revolvers and the first rifle musket replica, the Remington Zouave. Spanish firms were soon selling a variety of rifles and pistols through various importers and when CVA was formed (@ 1970 if my memory is correct) they became the staple of the CVA line.
 
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