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Pedersoli using Cekote

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Dr5x

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A recent Subscriber bought a Pedersoli flintlock that was coated with ceramic coating called Cekote which the manufacturer claims d--m near permanent.
Has anyone out there run into this product?
Is it some sort of permanent bluing?
I never liked bluing on an antique style rifle as it
is like grandma in a bikini.
Would like any news on this from that heat sea of knowledge out there.
Dutch
 

Marinekayak

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Cerakote is a baked on ceramic coating. I have a Pedersoli Frontier and a Traditions Mountain rifle both with Brown Cerakote on them from the factory. While not traditional it does look like rust browning from a distance is very durable and easy to clean.
 

dalmeida88

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Do you mean Cerakote? It's a ceramic coating used mostly on modern firearms in my experience. Very durable, rust and scratch resistance and can made to be any color you'd like.

Hope this helps,
Dave
 

JoJoLesh

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Yes I have some unmentionable guns with that finish on them.

It is very tough and nearly permanent but it can be worn away. I don't know what it would take to purposely remove it in a uniform way. The stuff is pretty tough and that is one of the advantages of it.
 

Carbon 6

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I've often wondered if a barrel could be Cermacromed, and what if any benefit it would have.
Cermacrome goes on the inside of the barrel not the outside.
 

JoJoLesh

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I've often wondered if a barrel could be Cermacromed, and what if any benefit it would have.
Cermacrome goes on the inside of the barrel not the outside.
My understanding is that cermachrome is mostly a heat barrier. It is also partly aluminum, so I don't know how well it will hold up in the shooting process
 

Carbon 6

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My understanding is that cermachrome is mostly a heat barrier. It is also partly aluminum, so I don't know how well it will hold up in the shooting process
I don't know what part is aluminum, but if it;s an aluminum oxide it is likely much harder than steel.
Cermacrome is used to line engine cylinders in high performance applications.
 

JoJoLesh

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....d to line engine cylinders in high performance applications.
Well if it holds up there it would probably hold up in a gun barrel. One minute of runtime in a race engine gets more steel on steel contact than a BP rifle sees lead on steel in a lifetime. Even with those engines getting rebuild after every race, there are a lot of revolutions in one race.

That the unmentionable rifle guys aren't doing it though leads me to suspect that it wouldn't have much of a benifit. They do chrome line barrels, sometimes.... But I think even the benifits of that are dubious (for the average shooter).
 

JoJoLesh

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Just thought about it more. I no longer have any unmentionables with Cerakote on them, or I would post a picture of how it can be worn off. I sold those thing off years ago and never did that process to anything since.

Seeing a black powder gun with it would be worse than those flintlocks with plastic stocks and fiber optic sights.
 

TreeMan

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My new Pedersoli trade gun has a cerakoted barrel. It looks pretty darn close to rust browning. I have a couple older Pedersolis that have that horrendous brown paint crap on the barrel that scratches off with a fingernail but non removable with any chemical. The cerakote looks much better.
 

JoJoLesh

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My new Pedersoli trade gun has a cerakoted barrel. It looks pretty darn close to rust browning. I have a couple older Pedersolis that have that horrendous brown paint crap on the barrel that scratches off with a fingernail but non removable with any chemical. The cerakote looks much better.
So maybe there is a classy way to do it. I'd only ever seen kinda gaudi attempts or ones that make guns look like plastic. I guess I have seen some artsy attempts to make a gun look weathered.... Nothing that would look good on a muzzleloader
 

TreeMan

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So maybe there is a classy way to do it. I'd only ever seen kinda gaudi attempts or ones that make guns look like plastic. I guess I have seen some artsy attempts to make a gun look weathered.... Nothing that would look good on a muzzleloader
I’ll try to get some pics of it tomorrow in the daylight.
 

tallpine

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I had a survival knife blade Cerakoted. It has held up amazingly well but I would not want it on any of my muzzleloaders.
 

Mark Herman

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My experience has been that Cerakote has been used on moderns for some time. I used Duracote on a couple of ML table guns. It's a spray on and also comes in colors. Very easy to use and very durable.
 

Loyalist Dave

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A recent Subscriber bought a Pedersoli flintlock that was coated with ceramic coating called Cekote which the manufacturer claims d--m near permanent.
Has anyone out there run into this product?
Is it some sort of permanent bluing?
I never liked bluing on an antique style rifle as it
is like grandma in a bikini.
Would like any news on this from that heat sea of knowledge out there.
Yes, well it might just be "like a grandma in a bikini".... 😆

Decades ago, Parkerizing was the "new" finish on the block, over bluing and browning, for modern firearms. It was durable compared to bluing, dull like matte-gray paint, and applied well to metal surfaces without the detailed prep that modern bluing required. So it was often cheaper. I have a custom modern rifle that was a project build that was done in parkerizing. It was "better" to an extent for all-weather applications of firearms, but it had its drawbacks, as different quality steels would have different colors when the process was done, so my project rifle is two-tone with the action one color and the barrel slightly different.

Along came baked on enamels for metals, and now there are ceramic coatings, as others have written. They are indeed more durable than bluing (which started out at "charcoal bluing" and transformed into "chemical bluing" btw) or browning or even parkerizing. Cerakote has an advantage over the traditional coating as it mimics the two "modern" coatings of chemical-blue and parkerizing quite well. It deals quite well with extreme heat, and all sorts of weird things may be done to the metal as the colors are up to the owner and the technician. Could it mimic rust-browning? It's quite possible. Close enough to be hard to tell if it was true, rust browning..., that too is possible, but I think the uniform appearance without any small differences at certain points on the barrel or the lock would be a clue it was not true rust-browning, but who knows what a talented technician could do.

I don't see our guns as utilitarian, and as many of us have expressed in the past, and as others have expressed on other forums when complaints come in about cleaning or "which BP substitute propellant is the cleanest"...., "If you don't like cleaning a dirty gun, then you shouldn't be doing black powder."

CERAKOTE 5.jpg


LD
 

Smokey Plainsman

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Original Hawken rifles were often slow rust blued. This is where a barrel was rust browned then boiled.

Many before, too.

To say bluing doesn’t belong on a traditional muzzleloading rifle proves the person has no idea what they are talking about.
 

SDSmlf

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Original Hawken rifles were often slow rust blued. This is where a barrel was rust browned then boiled.

Many before, too.

To say bluing doesn’t belong on a traditional muzzleloading rifle proves the person has no idea what they are talking about.
Back in the day civilian and military gunmakers didn’t boil gun parts to rust blue them, they used steam.....

Missed the earlier comment by someone about bluing not belonging on traditional muzzleloading rifles... Personally prefer traditional rust bluing over chemical bluing. Just like the durability and how it looks. Find browning and parkerizing even more durable, plus they seem to hold rust preventing oils very well. All three of these conversion coatings become integrated with the steel substrate, and while they wear and scratch, they do not chip or peel like the modern top coats do, as no matter what you call them, they are basically fancy paints. Though these top coats do provide very durable finishes, I just do not care for them on traditional muzzleloaders. They don’t seem to ‘naturally’ age as the wood and other components do. Just my opinion.
 

Dr5x

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Cerakote is a baked on ceramic coating. I have a Pedersoli Frontier and a Traditions Mountain rifle both with Brown Cerakote on them from the factory. While not traditional it does look like rust browning from a distance is very durable and easy to clean.
Original Hawken rifles were often slow rust blued. This is where a barrel was rust browned then boiled.

Many before, too.

To say bluing doesn’t belong on a traditional muzzleloading rifle proves the person has no idea what they are talking about.
THAT WOULD BE ME. .I have no idea when bluing came into practice but had always assumed, Incorrectly it seems that it was a practice begun un the late 1800's
In around 1979-80 I was a close witness of a real Hawken rifle which appeared unused. No scratches or any other signs of wear. The barrel was a smooth brown. and was the
rifle I had copied. The only variation from the original was I insisted on a .45 barrel.
I have been given to understand that all or most original Hawken were .50 and above.
Dutch Schoultz always learning.
 

SDSmlf

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THAT WOULD BE ME.
Well Dutch, what I read was you didn’t like bluing on antique guns, not that it doesn’t belong on a traditional muzzleloading rifle, and I agree with you. I much prefer that molted worn blue or brown finish than a bright blue or brown finish that looks like a new penny.

Keep posting.
 

Dr5x

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Well Dutch, what I read was you didn’t like bluing on antique guns, not that it doesn’t belong on a traditional muzzleloading rifle, and I agree with you. I much prefer that molted worn blue or brown finish than a bright blue or brown finish that looks like a new penny.

Keep posting.
I NEVER DID ANYTHING REGARDING THE COLOR OF MY RIFLE BARRELS. I JUST LET THE ACID OR WHATEVER ONE' HANDS TRANFER TO THE RAW STEEL.. A BIT SPLOTCHY AT FIRST BUT ENDING UP WITH A NICE BROWN WHICH STABELIZED WITH OIL
GOD. HOW I MISS THEM. I GAVE THEM TO MY GRAND SON WHO IS NOT INTERESTED I THE SHOOTING SPORT BUT WHO IS WEALTHY ENOUGH TO BE GREATLY INTERESTED IS SAIL BOATING. TSK!
DUTCH
 

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