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Pedersoli locks bad?

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Are pedersoli locks really that bad? I have about 1000 to spend on a gun, looking hard at both the dixie cub made by pedersoli and the pedersoli frontier, dont want to do a kit unless its in the white so kiblers are out. Searching the forum I see alot of bad about the pedersoli locks, but I also see a couple people saying there pretty easy to fix and tune up to be at the very least acceptable.
In fact, the Pedersoli's aren't the best of the best (much better than the Traditions but not as good as the Dedinski's), but those rifles are good regarding their price...
I have three of them, and apart from changing the flints or hardening a frizzen (twice), I haven't any story to spell...
 
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I have 2 older Pedersoli flintlocks, the Pennsylvania was my very first flintlock. At the time, buying them seemed thing to do. And I did learn how to polish locks and lighten springs by owning them. But rarely ever shoot them anymore. They aren't bad guns, it's just my Kiblers are better.
 
I have 2 older Pedersoli flintlocks, the Pennsylvania was my very first flintlock. At the time, buying them seemed thing to do. And I did learn how to polish locks and lighten springs by owning them. But rarely ever shoot them anymore. They aren't bad guns, it's just my Kiblers are better.
See i don't mind having to do a little work on the lock, part of the fun for me is tinkering I just don't want a kit gun
 
I have a flint mortimer rifle, trade gun, Bess and used to have a .32 Kentucky. Never an issue with any of them except the Mortimer. I broke a main spring on it shooting a match but it’s also almost forty years old. I currently use a 30+ year old percussion Pedersoli Tryon for matches. Never an issue. Maybe I’m just lucky. I’ve also never had an issue with a patent breach. Works just fine for me.
 
See i don't mind having to do a little work on the lock, part of the fun for me is tinkering I just don't want a kit gun
That’s exactly where I was when I bought my .50 Pennsylvania rifle. The overall quality of mine is fine, but it is an older one. I wanted to get a turn key flintlock without breaking the bank. So I can’t fault your reasoning. Where it leads you down the road is part of the fun.
 
Are pedersoli locks really that bad? I have about 1000 to spend on a gun, looking hard at both the dixie cub made by pedersoli and the pedersoli frontier, dont want to do a kit unless its in the white so kiblers are out. Searching the forum I see alot of bad about the pedersoli locks, but I also see a couple people saying there pretty easy to fix and tune up to be at the very least acceptable.
You will find lots of good advice on this forum from its many knowledgeable members.

I own a Dixie Pennsylvania .45 cal. flintlock rifle, made by Pedersoli. The lock is the same as is used on the Dixie Cub rifle in which you said you are interested. The lock on my rifle works fairly reliably but it has an appetite for flints. It is not often I can get a flint to last more than about 12 shots, even with knapping the edge. I sent the lock off to L.C. Rice some years back to see if he could improve it. His opinion was that the lock geometry was not good (to put it politely). I was also unable to find a replacement lock of better quality because it seems that the lock Pedersoli used on the Pennsylvania rifle, and Dixie used on the Cub rifle, is a unique size. The lock plate is 4-3/8" long by 15/16" high. L&R Locks had no replacement of this size at the time, nor did Jim Chambers Flintlocks or any other place I could think of to check. I gave up looking and shoot the rifle only rarely now, having been gifted with a MUCH better rifle that has a tuned, large Siler lock.

Good luck on your quest. There is something out there that will suit your needs.

OH, and get a rifle with a swamped barrel if you can. You'll thank me later. 😀
 
My Kentucky flintlock would not spark! Pedersoli. They finally sent me a new frizzen, and it didn't work either. We did shade tree gunsmithing and put a percussion lock on it. I didn't like it in percussion, and never shot more than five or ten shots out of it. My experience with Pedersoli was bad. Terribly disappointed!
 
My Kentucky flintlock would not spark! Pedersoli. They finally sent me a new frizzen, and it didn't work either. We did shade tree gunsmithing and put a percussion lock on it. I didn't like it in percussion, and never shot more than five or ten shots out of it. My experience with Pedersoli was bad. Terribly disappointed!
What didn't you like about it in percussion? I'm actually thinking of just getting a percussion now and making my own caps because there doesn't seem to be a decent flintlock in my price range
 
Pedersoli percussion locks are fine, but the flintlocks are of more random quality. Can't say for sure what your odds are of getting a good Pedersoli flintlock, but I can say that my experience has been 60% good straight out of the box, and 80% overall.
Of the five I own three were good to go on day one, one needed a bit of work to get it right, but the Harpers Ferry pistol will never be right because the lock is so poorly designed. They are one of the better quality production guns, provided you get one with a serviceable flintlock.
 
Plus another 200 for chisel, sharpening stones, and finishing supplies plus 20hrs of my time and possible frustration, yah no thanks maybe if i already had a gun to shoot id consider it. If an already built one in smoothbore does pop up on the classifieds for around 1300 though I'll definitely jump on it, but I'd much rather learn how to tune up a sub bar lock on a pedersoli, no way to fix the patent breech unfortunately looks like I'd just need to keep it clean
You are not counting the cost of the mainspring vise, polishing supplies etc for the lock repair? Not to mention gobs of time and frustration trying to tune a sub par lock?
 
I've shoot thousands of rounds through my Pedersoli .50 cal Kentucky flintlock pistol. The only change I made was adding a single set trigger. Sparking is great as long as the flint is sharp. The geometry is good and I get almost 100 shots per flint. Bill
 
I own the following Pedersoli guns:

Pedersoli P1858 (3-digit serial number; very early manufacture after taking over Euroarms) (percussion)
Pedersoli 1859 Sharps Carbine (percussion)
Pedersoli Pennsylvania (flintlock)
Pedersoli Brown Bess

I also own guns from Armi-Sport, Euroarms, James River Armory (which I think came from Euroarms), and Colt.

It is my opinion that of all the Italian gunmakers, Pedersoli probably does the best job on lock internals. Their springs are very well made, and their heat treatment of the tumbler and sear seem good. At least, I have had no problems with soft internals as I have with other manufacturers.

As far as flintlock performance goes, both my Pennsylvania and Brown Bess spark fairly reliably when the flint is good. I have had no issues with the patent breech in the Pennsylvania.
 
I own the following Pedersoli guns:

Pedersoli P1858 (3-digit serial number; very early manufacture after taking over Euroarms) (percussion)
Pedersoli 1859 Sharps Carbine (percussion)
Pedersoli Pennsylvania (flintlock)
Pedersoli Brown Bess

I also own guns from Armi-Sport, Euroarms, James River Armory (which I think came from Euroarms), and Colt.

It is my opinion that of all the Italian gunmakers, Pedersoli probably does the best job on lock internals. Their springs are very well made, and their heat treatment of the tumbler and sear seem good. At least, I have had no problems with soft internals as I have with other manufacturers.

As far as flintlock performance goes, both my Pennsylvania and Brown Bess spark fairly reliably when the flint is good. I have had no issues with the patent breech in the Pennsylvania.
I do agree with your opinion on their lock internals. Geometry on many or their flintlocks varies from good the p__s poor.
In order to get my Harpers Ferry pistol to function I had to open the front of the bridged cock, heat and bend the cock around 5 degrees down. Quench and draw down. Didn’t look correct, but worked.
My Pedersoli Frontier (Hatfield clone) had a miserable chambered breech with an ID of .24. Un-breeched and opened that cavity to 11/32, then corrected the depth of the vent liner. Helped quite a bit but the lock ate flints.
Eventually sold it too due to lackluster performance.
 
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What didn't you like about it in percussion? I'm actually thinking of just getting a percussion now and making my own caps because there doesn't seem to be a decent flintlock in my price range
Pedersoli percussion guns are reliable. Locks are good. I briefly had a Rocky Mountain Hawken, a really fine rifle. Only problem was the trigger guard was really sharp. Didn’t keep it though, way to heavy for this ol’ coot.
For a pre-built percussion that is reliable consider T/C Hawken, Renegade or older Lyman Great Plains Rifle, Investarms Gemmer (the new version of the Lyman)
All work very well.
 
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Do all Pedersoli flintlock guns have a patent breech? I ask because I've got their GP. Not had a problem but I'd still like to know.
 
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