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Pedersoli locks bad?

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Joined
Dec 3, 2023
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Location
Elko, Nevada
Are pedersoli locks really that bad? I have about 1000 to spend on a gun, looking hard at both the dixie cub made by pedersoli and the pedersoli frontier, dont want to do a kit unless its in the white so kiblers are out. Searching the forum I see alot of bad about the pedersoli locks, but I also see a couple people saying there pretty easy to fix and tune up to be at the very least acceptable.
 
UM well every manufacturer has had quality slip since COVID. Pedersoli locks are not as good as American made locks from lock manufacturers... as opposed to complete factory rifles. Does that make them "bad", no, but they may take more tweeking to get them working well, and the smaller they are, the more quirky they get.

For example, I have two rifles, one with a large Siler, one with a small. NEVER had sparking problems that didn't go beyond replacing a flint. I currently own two Pedersoli's one is a Bess, one is a tradegun. The Bess no problem, the trade gun frizzen wasn't properly hardened, and I have had to reharden several Pedersoli Bess frizzens. Once rehardened, they functioned like champs. On my previously owned Frontier rifle, which has a lock smaller than the tradegun, that lock functioned quite well, which is a large lock for Pedersoli rifles. The smaller rifles tend to have more ignition problems.

I've owned Thompson Centers that had good sparks and I've owned CVA's that were not so good, but eventually I figured them out. Which explains why at one time they made replacement locks (not sure if they are still made post-COVID) to replace TC and CVA locks, and also come models of Pedersoli locks.

For their cost, these days, I'd say a Pedersoli should really be a first rate sparking lock with a good trigger, and you can't be sure of that.

LD
 
I've got three Pedersoli flint locks and one Pedersoli percussion lock and they all work fine. I did disassemble and polish all the flint locks on the kit guns before first use, but that's all they really needed. The percussion lock was on a factory gun that I bought used, and it didn't need anything at all.
 
If you were to go with the Frontier, there is a replacement lock available from L&R for that model.

I think @FlinterNick does lock work. He might be able to tune the factory lock.

I really like the looks of the Hatfield/Frontier. Always have. They don't fit me worth a nickel though. Womp Womp

If you go with either of those models you mentioned, be aware that they have a chambered/patent breech. You might want to use the search feature to check that out.
 
I haven't had too many pendersoli locks. Each model is a little different. Their queen anne and harpers ferry pistols have geometry problems but the bess is fine. If you have an exact model you are looking at then its best to ask for insight from those with that model rather than simply manufacture
 
I have 3 flint Pedersolis - Brown Bess, Frontier, and Scout shotgun. Had no problems with the Bess. I replaced the Frontier lock with an L&R because there was a gap between the frizzen and pan on the factory lock. The lock on the Scout is fine but the trigger is so touchy I 'm not happy shooting it.
 
I have two, a Frontier and a kentucky pistol. The Frontier sparks great, the pistol was a kit and needed some tuning on the lock and trigger but now works great. I can say the Frontier shot great right from the box.
 
Yes -- I have two and both had to go to Brad Emig for a tuning.
This is more common than should be based on Pedersoli’s pricing. Buy an $1100-1300 gun, then pay a knowledgeable lock doctor like Brad Emig and additional $100-250 dollars depending on the work needed. Now you have equalled a Kibler Woodsrunner kit, which is by far the easiest kit for a novice to assemble and will outperform most, if not all, factory rifles due to the exceptional quality of his lock. Added benefits of his kit are historical correctness, a flat faced breech plug, correctly positioned touch hole and all American parts.
I’ve personally owned many factory flintlocks over the years ranging for ok
performance to dismal. They are all long gone. After finally building the Kibler Colonial, I cannot recommend factory built flintlocks.
Snoot
 
Are pedersoli locks really that bad? I have about 1000 to spend on a gun, looking hard at both the dixie cub made by pedersoli and the pedersoli frontier, dont want to do a kit unless its in the white so kiblers are out. Searching the forum I see alot of bad about the pedersoli locks, but I also see a couple people saying there pretty easy to fix and tune up to be at the very least acceptable.
Be not afraid! Basically, the Kibler Woodsrunner is so straightforward to assemble it is almost in the “white” already.
Pedersoli locks are fixable but at what additional time and cost?
Please make sure which Pedersoli you are considering has a flat faced breech plug, not the much more common patented/chambered breech plug.
 
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Save another 300 clams and get a kibler kit.

You’ll be MUCH happier.
Plus another 200 for chisel, sharpening stones, and finishing supplies plus 20hrs of my time and possible frustration, yah no thanks maybe if i already had a gun to shoot id consider it. If an already built one in smoothbore does pop up on the classifieds for around 1300 though I'll definitely jump on it, but I'd much rather learn how to tune up a sub bar lock on a pedersoli, no way to fix the patent breech unfortunately looks like I'd just need to keep it clean
 
Save another 300 clams and get a kibler kit.

You’ll be MUCH happier.
And it will be cheaper after you pay for the aftermarket lock. There is also the ridiculous chambered breech plug....... Just don't do it. : )

Get one of the Kiblers they are selling with the slightly blemished stocks. If a guy has any skill with his hands assembling and finishing a Kibler is not difficult. There is no need to make it a work art as many guys do. A simple sanding and finish will be fine. The resulting rifle will give years of satisfaction.
 
The OP's concern is with Pedersoli locks. They're not bad. They work. Maybe they can use some polishing and fine tuning. But if you really want a class lock that's so far above Pedersoli that there's really no comparison, it's one of the locks that Kibler Longrifles sells with their kit guns. If it's the lock that's of some concern to the OP, then dispel all concern and get a Kibler gun.
 
I suppose that depends on the comparison. In Europe, Pedersoli is widely seen as the higher end of production Italian replicas. If comparing to Traditions or CVA, I'd definitely prefer a Pedersoli.

When I wanted a production, but reasonably authentic plains rifle, I first opted for a Lyman Great Plains rifle (now out of production). I have that back home in Texas. In Europe, Pedersoli sells a Rocky Mountain plains rifle that is ~$300 more expensive, but has much nicer wood, a traditional lock, a German silver front sight, and overall, the fit and finish is much better than the LGP. I bought that in 2022. That will likely be my last production gun.

If your budget is $1000 and you can get the Pedersoli kit for under $1000, that's probably your best bet.

However, if I were going to finish a gun myself, with nicer wood, and some other upgrades, upgrading the lock would be high on my list. I have one L&R flintlock on a TVM Southern Rifle, and it is certainly better than the other production Italian replica locks. Function before aesthetics, I'd probably upgrade the lock before upgrading the wood.

If I were building a kit, I'd start with a Kibler, even if that meant waiting a few months to expand my budget to $1300 or $1500. If I thought I needed something less expensive for a first foray into building, I'd start with a production pistol kit.
 
I suppose that depends on the comparison. In Europe, Pedersoli is widely seen as the higher end of production Italian replicas. If comparing to Traditions or CVA, I'd definitely prefer a Pedersoli.

When I wanted a production, but reasonably authentic plains rifle, I first opted for a Lyman Great Plains rifle (now out of production). I have that back home in Texas. In Europe, Pedersoli sells a Rocky Mountain plains rifle that is ~$300 more expensive, but has much nicer wood, a traditional lock, a German silver front sight, and overall, the fit and finish is much better than the LGP. I bought that in 2022. That will likely be my last production gun.

If your budget is $1000 and you can get the Pedersoli kit for under $1000, that's probably your best bet.

However, if I were going to finish a gun myself, with nicer wood, and some other upgrades, upgrading the lock would be high on my list. I have one L&R flintlock on a TVM Southern Rifle, and it is certainly better than the other production Italian replica locks. Function before aesthetics, I'd probably upgrade the lock before upgrading the wood.

If I were building a kit, I'd start with a Kibler, even if that meant waiting a few months to expand my budget to $1300 or $1500. If I thought I needed something less expensive for a first foray into building, I'd start with a production pistol kit.
If you read above I mentioned not wanting to do a kit because of the extra cost and time involved, I'm just looking for a small bore flintlock that goes bang as reliably as possible within my price range and wanted opinions on pedersoli locks both good and bad, obviously I knew they werent the best before creating this thread
 
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