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Original or Modern Copy ?

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Robby

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An honest man, or an artful dodger? The shadow knows.
Robby
 
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toot

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back in the day for some reason we all draw filled off the MADE IN JAPAN, & SERIAL #. that is just what we did! after it was only a $30.00 pistol.
 

rickystl

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Good for you Hawkeye. Yes, appears the seller was not aware it is a copy. Good idea sending him a Link to this Thread. You would be surprised how many people that are otherwise knowledgeable more modern type guns, but have limited knowledge of antique/black powder guns.
In almost any given week, there seems to be one or more for sale on auction sites. They must have sold a lot of these back in the day.

That percussion pistol is indeed a mystery. Hmmmm. You're right, something just looks wrong about it. Possibly assembled from a variety of parts sometime in the later half of the 20th Century (?)

Any of you guys remember the Indian made doglock pistol copy I posted last year that had a masterful antique finish that was offered as an original - and sold for $6,000.00 ? Wonder if the buyer ever found out ? I tried warning the auction.

Rick
 

Sam squanch

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I’m sure the original pistol pictured will be on another auction site in the future...☹
 

rickystl

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That percussion pistol is so far going cheap, even if a hodge-podge copy of nothing. And, according to the ZIP code the seller lives right down the street from me !!!! LOL
 

Many Klatch

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I had two of those pistols. Paid $25 for one and $15 for the other. The internal parts had never been hardened. I threw all the original internals away and installed new siler parts. Had to drill new holes but it was only a cheap pistol. Spent part of one Winter fettling both of them (love that word). Removed extra wood, died the wood black. Got them both to shoot. They would hit a target at 12 yards if I used buckshot. Sold them for $75 each to Pyrate posers in Florida.
 

zimmerstutzen

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Luxurious rare ocean front Arizona property. flat lock plate. No visible depression for a proof mark or other marks. Lock screws have very square shoulders and all screw slots look to be quite squarely centered. $35.99 Centennial Arms special. Seller know it. Check the wording.

Now, imagine a law suit and you need to prove he said it was an original to win. Does he ever come out and say it is an original? Every thing is weasel worded. He come very close several times, but always there is a hedge. 18th century pistols like this bring......... Same exact statement applies to a reproduction. A fine example of ,,, well reproductions are examples of originals. Every part of this oozes Used Car Sales.

Now go back and read the response from the seller carefully. If he were honest, as you feel, he would amend the listing if there were any difficulty taking it down. He may be betting that whoever keeps bidding will still go through with it and his response to you will just be buried in digital neverland. Keep track of the listing, I bet it stays up through auction close, unless the high bidder needs to back out for that reason. Check his other auctions for similar crap. An auctioneer I know will say now we have what appears to be an old pistol. You are buying it for what it looks like, there are no quarantees of what it really is. I saw him sell old antique red glass automobile tail light lenses for over $800. That is what he said about them. Turned out the were junk lenses from carnival rides and were still being made. He covered himself
 
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Eric Krewson

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Looks like an honest update to me.


"Update: After receiving a series of thoughtful feedback on this item, we have concluded that it is a more modern reproduction and not from the King George-era/early 19th century. GB does not make it easy to take down an item so we will not hold the high bidder to buying this item. Sorry for the issue here."
 

springfield art

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It can be as bad as "The Road Show". Some of the prices they tell these poor people are way off at best. My family has been dealing antiques for over 150 years and they watch this program like it's a comedy show. At Cabela's (in the back room from the Library Office to the storage area I put a large sign up that read: "This Is Not Your Road Show Moment" that would make the employees grin as they went into the Library.

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The Road Show episodes where they show old ones, then show the current, 10-year later price is interesting; some things go way up, some way down.
 

zimmerstutzen

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Looks like an honest update to me.


"Update: After receiving a series of thoughtful feedback on this item, we have concluded that it is a more modern reproduction and not from the King George-era/early 19th century. GB does not make it easy to take down an item so we will not hold the high bidder to buying this item. Sorry for the issue here."
OMG, Diogenes, where are you?
 

Eric Krewson

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I know a guy who lives is Las Vegas, he said local museum pieces are borrowed on a regular basis than take to the fictitious "pawn shop" by people to provide content for the show. On these items the dead is never struck, the offer is always turned down and the item is back in the museum the next day.
 

Buck Conner

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When still in business (muzzle loading supplies, retail and wholesale) some of these phoney programs were a pain in my side. A customer would bring in an antique firearm thinking it was worth what he saw on one of these shows. The difference betweeh the two guns being compared is like night and day, they don't understand its about dates made and condition is everything.

The worst is the customer with a gun that their relation gave them with a baloney story about the gun. A good example is a guy comes in with his grandfather's antique firearm. He wants to get a value for insurance purposes (we don't even go there, that's a can of worms anymore). Then he tells us what he has. In many cases not even close. Example: he has a breech loading percussion musket from the Civil War period in very poor condition. He claims this gun was used in the French & Indian Wars. One of my guys tries to explain he off by a 100 years and then the "dog fight" starts. We don't know anything according to this customer, even after showing him pictures in several books of the difference in periods. He doesn' believe us because his grandfather knows more than someone that deals in these guns daily.
After an hour of listening to him being a jerk he leaves. :doh: I was about ready to ask this to happen.

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