Old Lehigh barn gun

Discussion in 'Photos' started by Stophel, Oct 4, 2019.

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  1. Oct 4, 2019 #1

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

    75 Cal.

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    I started this gun a long time ago. Like 12 years ago. It was a very experimental gun, as I was trying different things to see how they would do. As such, if this were something I was starting new today (and I don't think I would), I would do some things different (particularly, I would use a much taller lockplate!). Originally, I had stripes painted on the stock with India ink, and a red varnish on top, but I was having difficulty with the varnish, and I stripped it all off, and then it sat. For over a decade. So, I figured I should probably finish the thing up, and recently I got at it. I did what I could with it, considering that it mostly couldn't be changed any, and decided to make it look like an old gun... which it already was! :D

    This is the first gun I have made (or at least completed! :D ) in about 5 or 6 years.

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  2. Oct 4, 2019 #2

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

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    What a beautiful piece.
     
  3. Oct 4, 2019 #3

    Silky921

    Silky921

    Silky921

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    I think it looks good man. Always have loved that weathered look.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2019 #4

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

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    The simple elegance of excellence.
     
  5. Oct 22, 2019 #5

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

    36 Cl.

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    Looks great, and does have that "old" look.
     
  6. Oct 22, 2019 #6

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

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    Must have been a classy barn. Great architecture.
     
  7. Oct 22, 2019 #7

    Critter Getter

    Critter Getter

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    I wish I could find that laying in the corner of my barn!! Greg
     
  8. Oct 22, 2019 #8

    Stophel

    Stophel

    Stophel

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    Thank you.
    It is definitely over-finished for a barn gun.

    I may have overdone the diamond shaping of the wrist, but I liked it that way. ;) I wish I had used a different lockplate. This one is pretty skinny, and it kinda screws things up. I could have cut the lock panels down to be closer to the lockplate, but that would have further killed the flat, horizontal look that Lehigh guns should have here. A wider lock would especially have helped at the top, where Lehigh guns are generally nearly flat all the way across. But, it was the lock I had, and the lock I used. I made the tumbler, bridle, and sear for it. I've often made bridles, but this is the first tumbler I made. I had the local machine shop make me up some "wheels" out of mild steel, with a large axle on one side (to go through the lockplate) and a small axle on the other side (for the bridle), and I cut it out from there.... they weren't cheap! :D I don't remember what it cost me, but I was kind of shocked.
     
  9. Oct 23, 2019 #9

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

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    That’s a lot of work. A friend cut me a couple such wheels to use for making tumblers for large musket locks. Have not used them yet.

    I saw ( forget where) an original lock with a tumbler repair that had me thinking. A section of the tumbler including both notches was cut out, a wedge was brazed in place to replace the old section and (I suppose) the new notches were filed in place. I’m guessing this was a repair for worn or broken notches. But it could be done today with a “factory” tumbler to change the timing of the lock (how far back the cock moves at half and full cock). Anneal and get after it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019

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