Matchlock Revolver

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Timuni

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And Timuni, when I shot my sear-bar matchlock in the 1970's I had full confidence that any time a source of fire is around black powder, there's sure to be an explosion somewhere.
Fortunately, as a target shooter rather than a hunter or soldier, I only have to rely on that explosion for punching holes in inanimate objects, so I'm able to do my best to ensure that burning rope stays well away from any powder until I'm ready to make things go boom. I did know a guy who had a lucky escape after not watching where his match was ... it happened to be near one of the charges on his bandoleer. I guess the lesson is that no matter what "lock" you're working with, treat the combination of flame and powder with your utmost attention. Hard for me to imagine, as a target shooter, how it was for guys using the same guns when under the stress of combat...

They particularly faced many heavy Jinghals but the Tibetans were quite well aware of the obsolescence of their arms and were not only importing some breechloaders but were making Martini Henry copies and their ammunition in Lhasa at the time.
I recall reading that Tibetan infantry during this invasion were also armed with more portable matchlock muskets ... there's an anecdote in the book 'Queen Victoria's Enemies: Part 4' by Ian Knight about Tibetan matchlockmen assaulting a British foritified position and trying to stick their muskets through the loopholes to shoot back at the Brits ... unfortunately the loopholes had been built with Sikh soldiers in mind, and according to the author the Tibetans found themselves a bit too short to properly sight through them.

But it's true, the Tibetans were no fools and were taking some steps to adopt more modern weaponry. Their armed forces during China's "warlord period" of the 1910s-20s were an odd mix of medieval and modern ... spears and Lee-Enfields.
 

Jay Templin

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comprised matchlock fireing from the saddle giving a lie to the oft quoted myth that matchlocks where ill suited to horsemen,s needs . We all know this is true but the Sowars evidently didn't know this so acted as very capable cavalry.'
My issue wasn’t with the matchlock a-horse (though he didn’t care for the sparks at all), it was with the damned chargers on my bandolier swinging up and popping me in the mush at the canter! 🤣
Jay
 

Rudyard

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Jay your a gem ,a positive tonic , I've rode an old moke used for trecking kids . But had a Brown Bess I tried a bit of priming No reaction .Bit more still ok .a light load same again, so I loaded a full charge and got away with it ' experimental archiologie I think they call it. Could be why the collar of bandoleers was replaced by Patrons & paper cartridges .
Regards Rudyard
 

Jay Templin

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Jay your a gem ,a positive tonic , I've rode an old moke used for trecking kids . But had a Brown Bess I tried a bit of priming No reaction .Bit more still ok .a light load same again, so I loaded a full charge and got away with it ' experimental archiologie I think they call it. Could be why the collar of bandoleers was replaced by Patrons & paper cartridges .
Regards Rudyard
Cavalry did adopt cartridges about 100 years before the ground pounders did. We’re not just dashing and debonair, but clearly somewhat brighter. 😉
Jay
(13 VA Cavalry, Co H)
 

RAEDWALD

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Cavalry did adopt cartridges about 100 years before the ground pounders did. We’re not just dashing and debonair, but clearly somewhat brighter. 😉
Jay
(13 VA Cavalry, Co H)
First time I have heard of cavalry (‘cavwy’) being called bright.......says ex Yeomanry trooper.
 

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