I know I have brought this up before but I have heard...

Discussion in 'The Gun Builder's Bench' started by sussexmuzllodr, Sep 17, 2019.

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  1. Sep 17, 2019 #1

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

    40 cal - b

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    About some folks shoeing a frizzen. What materials do you use? And how do you go about it?
    SM
     
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  2. Sep 18, 2019 #2

    dave_person

    dave_person

    dave_person

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    Hi,
    There are different ways to do it. Putting a sole on a frizzen has several advantages. It adds mass to the frizzen, which is often a good thing and the sole can be hardened optimally without compromising that feature when tempering the frizzen after hardening. A sole can be attached with steel rivets, which was often done in the past. However, the frizzen must be annealed to drill it. The method I use is easy and I consider it the best option by far. You don't need to anneal the frizzen just lleave it as it is. Make a frizzen face or sole from annealed high carbon steel. Grind it to shape and fit it to the curve of the frizzen face. Then harden it by bringing it to bright red and quenching in oil. Drop it in the quench on its edge which should reduce any warping. I often give the sole a little more curve than needed, which gets straightened a little during quench. Clean up both sides of the sole and the frizzen face and tin the face with plumber's solder or low temp silver bearing solder. Flux the insdie face of the sole, lay it on the frizzen face held horizontal and heat the frizzen from underneath until the solder flow and the sole settles into place. Then let cool and clean up. I make the sole a little over sized and grind off the excess after soldering. One word of warning: make sure that added thickness of the sole will clear the fence on the pan. That is a problem for some locks like Silers. You can thin the sole on the bottom to fit, file back the fence, or end the sole above the fence. One nice thing with this method is that the frizzen is not altered in any way and if the sole doesn't work for you, just heat and remove it, and clean up the frizzen. You are back to square one.

    dave
     
  3. Sep 18, 2019 #3

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

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    Thanks Dave
     
  4. Sep 18, 2019 #4

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Dave,

    Your way is best I'm sure, but a mate back in the UK, who shoots national and International with his "Besses, uses "Araldite" epoxy to hold the facing on.
    He found that old wood saws make nice thin faces, and seem to last forever, (or nearly so!)

    Best regards,
    R.
     
  5. Sep 18, 2019 #5

    45man

    45man

    45man

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    Any heat will soften the facing. When any solder melts it is hot enough to remove hardness of the facing.
    Any good lock today uses tool steel hard all the way through. Case hardened iron is long gone.
     
  6. Sep 18, 2019 #6

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    45 Man,

    Low temp solder will not remove the temper. Trust Dave on this if not me. Dave knows of what he speaks.

    Case hardened iron is also not long gone, and when working on antique arms it is more or less All we are dealing with.

    Best,
    R.
     
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  7. Sep 18, 2019 #7

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

    sussexmuzllodr

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    Thanks Dave, Did it now and it came out perfect. Hacksaw blade heated cherry red. Then quenched in oil. Heated back to a cherry red and then dipped in cherry red.( I liked the old kasenit better)
    Back up to red and then in the oil again. Soft soldered it on cleaned it up and it sparks like mad.
    Was on an old Lyman frizzen. Thanks to everyone for the input.

    Sm
     
  8. Sep 19, 2019 #8

    dave_person

    dave_person

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    Great! It really is pretty easy and the heating for soldering does little to affect the hardening. Richard, the epoxy sounds like a neat idea and sure would simplify the process. I will stick with solder only because it fills in the seam between the frizzen and sole and when you grind the edges flush the seam almost disappears except if you brown or blue the frizzen, which I never do.

    dave
     
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  9. Sep 21, 2019 #9

    dd832

    dd832

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    Here's a 1833 Manton carbine lock that had steel applied to the frizzen when it was new. Unfortunately, most of the carbines were dismantled and the parts sold off. Mike
    3266612_1.jpg
     
  10. Sep 23, 2019 #10

    dd832

    dd832

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