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Got a little lucky with my 1st load.

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Sean Gadhar

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Don't have the shooting room open at the moment but I think the Hornady are .315 if memory serves me right.
 

ord sgt

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There is still plenty of time to tweak the load and tighten the group. If this was from the offhand position, try again from a shooting bench, to take away random movement. Still, not too bad. The barrel still needs to get smoothed some and then it will really shine.
 

rafterob

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That's always a pleasant surprise. I put together a CVA Mountain Pistol a few years back. First shot with 20 grains 3f in the 10 ring. No sight adjustments or load development ever needed.
 

Col. Batguano

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The trickiest part of getting a gun ready for the first trip to the range is filing the front sight to a height that will put you on the paper. For that I generally file them to a height slightly higher (above the bore axis) than the rear sight height. With a swamped barrel you have to do the calculations rather than simply measure off the top flat because the barrel width is going to be different at those 20 points. That SHOULD put me slightly low. From there it's a simple matter of doing the calculations as far as how much to remove. I usually do them BEFORE I head to the range so that I know how much differential in sight height equals 1 inch. I use calipers to scratch the marking on the front sight and am ALWAYS conservative in the amount I remove. Get close, test, adjust, repeat.
 

hanshi

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I use a .311" ball, .023" canvas patch and have found the 20 grn to 30 grn range to shoot better than I can hold. You're off to a good start and a bit of experimenting with lube/patch might further help your quest.
 

Sean Gadhar

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The trickiest part of getting a gun ready for the first trip to the range is filing the front sight to a height that will put you on the paper. For that I generally file them to a height slightly higher (above the bore axis) than the rear sight height. With a swamped barrel you have to do the calculations rather than simply measure off the top flat because the barrel width is going to be different at those 20 points. That SHOULD put me slightly low. From there it's a simple matter of doing the calculations as far as how much to remove. I usually do them BEFORE I head to the range so that I know how much differential in sight height equals 1 inch. I use calipers to scratch the marking on the front sight and am ALWAYS conservative in the amount I remove. Get close, test, adjust, repeat.
You trust your math WAY more than I do my own. I just set out a Target with a bar going across, then with a shiny front sight I just darken the vary top a tiny bit with a sharpie, aim at the bar acting as if the spot where the shine ends is the top. Repeat. When I am happy I file off everything that is darkened.

IMG_3515.JPG
 

SDSmlf

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I'll still tweak it until I'm happy, but this was the vary 1st Group from my Pedersoli .32 cal. Flintlock

.010 Patch
Hornady Ball
20 Grains (By Volume) FFFg
Home made lube
FFFFG Prime



Pedersoli .32 flintlock's vary 1st Group <------ Click for Video
Great first time out. My Pedersoli 32 flinter places five shots touching at 25 yards if I do my part. Didn’t happen first time out.
 

Maven

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I'll still tweak it until I'm happy, but this was the vary 1st Group from my Pedersoli .32 cal. Flintlock

.010 Patch
Hornady Ball
20 Grains (By Volume) FFFg
Home made lube
FFFFG Prime



Pedersoli .32 flintlock's vary 1st Group <------ Click for Video
Sean, That was the first FL I ever fired (It belonged to a friend) and managed to put two shots touching @ 25 yd. The flash from the pan was a mite disconcerting at first though! It's good gun, enjoy it!
 

Col. Batguano

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Here you go. From an old post explaining sight adjustment formula. Though it is explained for rear sight adjustment, for differential purposes front and rear sight movement amounts to pretty much the same thing. The only difference is that the front sight is just going to be that many inches closer to the target, so the movement of it will be a few thousandths less than the rear to achieve the same result. If you're shooting a 3" group at 100 yards the differential between front and rear movement is MORE than taken up in where you choose to call your center of the group.

Practically and hypothetically speaking; if the calculation calls for you to move the rear sight .107" to get a 1" movement, you would have to move the front sight .105"to get the same result. .002" just isn't enough for our purposes (shooting 3" groups) to be a material difference. Now if you were trying to hit a specific spot on the moon with a laser (like a 1 meter square reflective mirror to measure the Earth-to-moon distance as was left by the Apollo missions), then yeah, those adjustment differentials to the right of the decimal point make a big big difference. But you're lobbing lead from a muzzle loader at 100 yards. Not measuring the difference in distance to the moon to the fraction of an inch over 238,555.38492 miles.

D1 / R1 = D2 / R2
For rear sight adjustments:

D1 is the distance between point of aim and point of impact.
R1 is range from front sight to target.
D2 is the length the rear sight must change by.
R2 is the distance between front and rear sights.
For front sight adjustments:

D1 is the distance between point of aim and point of impact.
R1 is range from rear sight to target.
D2 is the length the front sight must change by.
R2 is the sight radius distance between front and rear sights.
This formula calculates the MAGNITUDE ONLY of the sight height change; refer to the instructions above to find the correct direction for the adjustment (front or rear sight, longer or shorter). Likewise, all distances must be in the same units. That is, if a change in inches to the sight height is desired, and one is shooting on a 100 yard range, then R1 (100 yd) must be converted to inches (100 x 36 = 3600 inches) before using this distance in the equation.

An example: Consider a rifle with a distance between front and rear sights of 26.25 inches, firing on a 50 yard (1800 inches) range, with point of impact 5.3 inches too high on the target, having a front sight blade that is 0.505 inches high mounted in a dovetail. How much must the front sight blade height be changed by to fix this problem? (It will be assumed that the muzzle of the rifle intrudes into the range space for following typical gun range safety protocols, and the rear sight is hence 50 yards from the target.)

D2 = R2(D1/R1) = 26.25(5.3/1800) = 0.077" (magnitude of change to front sight height)
Since the gun is hitting too high, the front sight must be lengthened by this much per the instructions cited previously; hence, the front sight must be replaced with a blade that is 0.505" + 0.077" = 0.582" high. With this correction, the rifle will hit the desired point of impact, all other factors being equal.
 
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