Chronogragh Recommendation Needed

Discussion in 'Shooting Accessories' started by Historian, Jan 13, 2020 at 7:08 PM.

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  1. Jan 13, 2020 at 7:08 PM #1

    Historian

    Historian

    Historian

    36 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    Can anyone tell me what a good chronograph recommendation would be? I am wanting to use one for shotgun load development. Also would you recommend measuring directly at the muzzle or 3 feet distance?

    Thanks for the help guys.
     
  2. Jan 13, 2020 at 7:34 PM #2

    Stumpkiller

    Stumpkiller

    Stumpkiller

    That Other Moderator Staff Member MLF Supporter

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    I have a Competition Electronics ProChrono DLX that is simple and very useful. I even tried a BB gun and it picked them up fine!

    If you have Bluetooth it will "talk" to a smart phone or computer. I like this as when I get home I can upload the shot strings to my desktop and print them out for my reloading records; and it lists the high/low and standard dev. Even calculates energy if you enter the bullet weight (optional). And also save the results off the unit (It stores 10 strings of up to 99 shots each). Note that the DLX can be had for $10 more than the base "digital" model - and the 25 ft cable and adapter to connect the base model to a PC is $40! So if you have Bluetooth the DLX is the lesser cost for up-loadable results. Or just write them down as you shoot or when you get home. ;-)

    With the smartphone you can see (and hear) the velocity of each shot seconds after.

    Something happened to Shooting Chrony and the Alpha and Beta units are getting bad reviews recently.

    I would recommend NOT right at the muzzle as the blast is not good to the unit and the powder ash/embers may get into the sensor ports. Take the sky-screens and posts off and step back 5 feet. There are instructions in the manual. Also a good idea to get the debris shield (its an $15 acrylic cover to protect the display and sensor ports). Won't stop a bullet but it will a wad or pellet. Use golf tees or nails/pegs to hold it without the posts.
     
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  3. Jan 13, 2020 at 8:49 PM #3

    Phil Coffins

    Phil Coffins

    Phil Coffins

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    Stumpkillers sounds very nice especially for fellows with computer savvy.
    I use a Pact professional and like the printer that’s built in. Also the device sets right beside you and only the screens are down range. The instructions will tell you how far to set the screens down range and the computer will calculate back to the muzzle. Does more then just velocity and will print out all sorts of data. Mines lasted over 20 years with out problems.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2020 at 10:39 PM #4

    hanshi

    hanshi

    hanshi

    Cannon

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    Most, even the cheap ones, are very good and accurate. 25 years ago I bought an Oehler chronograph. It still works like new. It came with a standard start/stop sky-screen setup but also a third one between them that tagged any "bad" shot reading. I mount them about 10-12 feet in front of the muzzle for modern guns and at least 15 feet from the muzzle of round ball BP guns.
     
  5. Jan 14, 2020 at 12:42 AM #5

    Historian

    Historian

    Historian

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    Thanks Gentlemen for the replies. I am just worried about the wadding material throwing off the reading if graph is too far away from the muzzle. 1 OP Wad, 2 Felt Lubed wads at 1/4 inch, one under the shot and one over to seal the bore. I will have to experiment.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2020 at 12:49 AM #6

    Woodnbow

    Woodnbow

    Woodnbow

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    I’ve had my Chrony F1 for 25 years and it’s been flawless in that time. The instructions warn that you should place a,cardboard or other material shield in front of the unit when shooting blackpowder firearms. I didn’t always do this and one fine day I smacked the display with a wonder wad from a .54 Renegade. Ouch! Cost me $30.00 plus shipping but they fixed it and I’ve had no trouble since.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2020 at 2:09 AM #7

    Stumpkiller

    Stumpkiller

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    I use a simple "rule of thumb" from Maj. George C. Nonte Jr's "Modern Handloading" (Modern in 1972, that is. Still a great resource).

    1. Measure distance in feet from muzzle to mid-point between screens of the Chronograph.
    2. Multiply measurement from 1. above by 0.64
    3. Add result from 2. to average velocity of string.

    It is an approximation ignoring BC & SD, but if your string is +/- 15 fps anyhow then it is close enough for ranges of 600 yards and under. I use this to establish the "cheat sheet" for my scope's BDC for the "actual" muzzle velocity and it is well within any ability for me to say "good enough".
     
  8. Jan 14, 2020 at 2:37 AM #8

    mushka

    mushka

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    I have the basic Pact. Many years old. Gives velocities, extreme spread, average velocity of the string and the average deviation. Not real expensive but good. You can get a printer for it if you want it, I just use a notebook and pen. It's easy to set up but the cardboard in front of the sky screen is a good idea for BP guns.
     
  9. Jan 14, 2020 at 7:56 AM #9

    Frontier's

    Frontier's

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    40 cal - b

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    Caldwell makes a great chronograph.
     
  10. Jan 14, 2020 at 3:49 PM #10

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

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    I place mine at 10 feet from the muzzle and need a steel baffle in front to keep wads and other ejected debris from going through the face of the chrono .

    I like the idea of the small web camera to look at the screen as it would make it easy to get the data, but if I was buying a new chrono I would look into the radar style that mounts behind the line of fire/.
     
  11. Jan 16, 2020 at 5:28 AM #11

    Historian

    Historian

    Historian

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    Thanks for all the replies. I will be getting a Competition Electronics ProChrono DLX. I appreciate this as well.

    I use a simple "rule of thumb" from Maj. George C. Nonte Jr's "Modern Handloading" (Modern in 1972, that is. Still a great resource).

    1. Measure distance in feet from muzzle to mid-point between screens of the Chronograph.
    2. Multiply measurement from 1. above by 0.64
    3. Add result from 2. to average velocity of string.

    It is an approximation ignoring BC & SD, but if your string is +/- 15 fps anyhow then it is close enough for ranges of 600 yards and under. I use this to establish the "cheat sheet" for my scope's BDC for the "actual" muzzle velocity and it is well within any ability for me to say "good enough".
     
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