vintage american large bore fowler

Discussion in 'Smoothbore' started by morb, Nov 22, 2018.

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  1. Nov 23, 2018 #21

    toot

    toot

    toot

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    I like the fact that it has what appear to be platinum blow out plugs. they came on higher grade guns.
     
  2. Nov 23, 2018 #22

    Feltwad

    Feltwad

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    I am afraid that most shooters think that the platinum plugs are blow out plugs in case of a bore obstruction ,this is not correct the purpose of these plugs which have a small vent in the centre is when the cap is ignited it draws air in through the vent which in turn gives a quicker ignition to the main charge
    Feltwad
     
  3. Nov 23, 2018 #23

    Britsmoothy

    Britsmoothy

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    When the cap is ignited and pressure developes there won't be anything drawn in via the vents at all.

    Some believe it was so the charge could breath a little and or some self cleaning take place which is unlikely as the nipple will do the same as that anyway.

    I smell it was all a gimmick, a sales pitch thing.
    Otherwise it would still be required today.

    B.
     
  4. Nov 23, 2018 #24

    Feltwad

    Feltwad

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    It was all a gimmick afraid not . Cannot see the Victorian gunmaker installing a platinum plug for no useful reason , has the user of originals maybe that's why I can fire a hundred shot in a outing and not have a misfire .
    Feltwad
     
  5. Nov 23, 2018 #25

    Rat

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    I see no problem, drawback or fault if it has been "bobbed". I certainly would not call it a short-barreled gun. Regardless of what it was made for, I'm thinking it would suffice far anything you needed sufficing for. Could probably use .375" balls for buckshot.
     
  6. Nov 23, 2018 #26

    Rat

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    What a vented plug does, is that it prevents the flash of the cap from compressing the air in front of it, which can delay ignition, and help ensure reliable ignition. I believe it will also allow some of the crud to blow out the vent, instead of back up into the nipple. Will also allow a slightly heavier charge without blowing the hammer back. I have vented the bolsters on two of my civil war rifles, (replicas) and it does seem to work. When hunting I press a tiny ball of bee's wax over the vent, so the rain drops can't get in. It certainly does not draw air in, it lets it out, instead of compressing it.
     
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  7. Nov 23, 2018 #27

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

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    Very interesting guns, thanks, but the OP's has a rib, and has a ramrod, so it isn't a pigeon gun..., or do you think it's a repurposed pigeon gun ?

    LD
     
  8. Nov 23, 2018 #28

    Feltwad

    Feltwad

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    The gun is not a live pigeon gun it is sporting gun for its bore size which was used for fowling but at some later time has had its length reduced . Lets not forget that these guns were built with barrels that average 36 to 40 inches mainly due to the powder used . The powder then was not has strong has todays black powder it was a coarse powder and it needed a long barrel to burn has black powder gains velocity has burns up the bore.
    Feltwad
     
  9. Nov 24, 2018 #29

    Rat

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    So what is the length of the barrel on that? If stated I seem to have missed it. If it weighs 9 pounds now, we my want to thank the barrel-bobber. An 11 pound gun with a 40 inch barrel probably wouldn't get used much. As is, I'd be elated and cross eyed with joy to take that thing out for a days hunt. Morbster, have you purchased it?
     
  10. Nov 24, 2018 #30

    morb

    morb

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    the description states it has a 31'' barrel. i'm just waiting to hear from the seller for a bit more info but i think it's a done deal as soon as i hear from him.
    the more i look at it and the more i read everyone's comments the more i like it.

    i showed it to mama and told her i was going to buy it, she said "oh that's cool" last gun i bought i heard "what the (insert profanity here) do need another gun for?"
     
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  11. Nov 24, 2018 #31

    BrownBear

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    I can verify. I have a 58 caliber GRRW Hawken built very close to originals, and with its tapered 36" barrel it tips the scale at 12.5#. I'd hunt with it more if we still had our horses, as did the original Hawken users. But hunting on foot quickly turns into a lug job. Perhaps more than coincidentally, the 58 cal I hunt with most often tips the scales at 9#.
     
  12. Nov 24, 2018 #32

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    What I'd heard about the platinum vents, was that early caps were pretty savage, and the vent let some of the pressure off. Also, with caps being a new idea, and folks used to a touchhole, they thought a gun needed a little hole to let pressure off to some degree.
    I think Hawker speaks of this in "Instructions".

    Feltwad,
    Bill Curtis' tests seem to show that the old Curtis's and Harvey powder had more go than most modern powder.
    Yes, there Was a problem with Government powder in the early 1800's, but later stuff was the cream of the crop.
    (Talking British stuff here)
     
  13. Nov 24, 2018 #33

    Rat

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    Trust me, the purpose of a vented breech, or plug, is what I said. :) It provides more reliable ignition. It allows the flash of the cap to travel faster to the main charge. Really. Seriously. :)
     
  14. Nov 24, 2018 #34

    Rat

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    My experience has been that a 9 pound gun is manageable, when you get to around ten, or more then it does become a lug-job. Eight pounds is what I like, anything lighter is gravy, or icing on the cake. Both my Jeager, and Bessie weigh 8.25#'s.
     
  15. Nov 24, 2018 #35

    Feltwad

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    Maybe in the states fowling was different to here in the Uk The UK fowler would carry his gun to a flight line on the fore shore or the inland marshes which in those days were known has ings. Here they would either wait for morning or evening flight and with their big bore guns up to a 4 bore shoot the incoming or roosting flight , The weight of these big guns were not for carrying very far .
    Feltwad
    Stand Of Long Fowler
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2018
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  16. Nov 24, 2018 #36

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Rat,

    In the above I was not saying what a vent in a percussion gun Did, but what I had heard they "Thought" it did.
    Are you with me, re. the difference?

    This from Hawker's "Instructions to young Sportsmen", page 73;
    Vent Hole;
    A detonator without a vent hole, though perhaps it may shoot a little stronger, is very liable to corrode, and Recoils most cruelly. The best vent -hole, to my fancy, is a fixed one of platina (Platinum), and similar to a touchhole; as vent screws, I find are liable to rust in; and , unless lined with platina, are either soon choked up with rust and dirt, or blown too large by repeated shooting".

    It's like the topic of "Chewing the shot" before loading it down the barrel;
    Many 'knew' better long range patterns could be produced by this method. (!) but the reasons all varied why this should be!

    All the best, my friend.
    Richard.

    Feltwad,
    Just saw your photo of that grand stand of fowling pieces! I Do really like that old bod right in the middle!
    You should show it to us in another thread!
     
  17. Nov 24, 2018 #37

    Rat

    Rat

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    Gotcha. Understood! :)
     
  18. Nov 24, 2018 #38

    stubshaft

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    I remember the Dixie Gun Work catalods with all of the hints and kinks in the back. There was always a blurb about drilling the percussion drum with a #60 drill to vent it.
     
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  19. Nov 25, 2018 #39

    aeatwood

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    I recall an article in the Shooter's Bible annual several years ago that was a reprint of a very old article from the 1930's or so by Fred Kimble. Claimed to have invented choking in the '60's or '70's, and experimented a good bit with it before coming across a custom 6-bore that the owner died before it could be completed. He purchased it and used it for decades water-fowling and crow hunting. IIRC, his load was 1 1/4oz of shot.

    I purchased an 8-bore pigeon gun from a VP of Pedorsoli in the U.S that had shot it for a few years in Friendship. It weighs about 8, and gives incredible patterns with #6, 7 1/2 and 8 shot, with anything from 1 1/8 to 1 1/2 oz of shot, thin card wads and a volume load of 1F Goex.
     
  20. Nov 26, 2018 #40

    morb

    morb

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    i talked to the dealer about the fowler today, very nice guy. he assures me that the barrel hasn't been cut and that it is a very solid gun. so now i gotta wait to see what happens with postal strike here, could be a while before i get to see it
     

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