Value for money powder horn and shooting pouch

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GoodRabbitPilgrim

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Any suggestions for these? As I look to transition into flintlocks I see the need for more space. The value part comes from the fact that with currency exchange and shipping you can add 50% on to the cost.

Something practical I.e. waterproof and that isn't going to readily spill things when I crawl through brush. For the powder horn I prefer plain so no scrimshaw is necessary. I'm just a guy who enjoys hunting through the wilds, no competitions and unfortunately no friends that shoot BP with me.
 

ghostdncr

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I will always vote for self made, even if not historically correct. Making your own gear extends your knowledge base and seems to give a deeper connection to the roots of our pursuit. Just my $.02 of course, and I hope you find something that suits you!
 

new2bp

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If you aren't going for authenticity or even faux-thenticity then go with what works for you. I've got some 3cc plastic test tubes ($10/100 on amazon) with built in snap lids that are perfect for premeasured powder loads for my 1858, and a milsurp from some Euro country messenger pouch does a good job of holding quite a few of them as well as a small DnD dice pouch full of balls and a small (2oz or so?) mini-tupperware type container for pre-lubed wads, cleaning kit stuff, etc.
 

Brokennock

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Making your own gear extends your knowledge base and seems to give a deeper connection to the roots of our pursuit
I am curious as to your thinking on the emphasized portion of your statement.
Not arguing, just curious.
It would seem to imply that our forebears made most of what they had, when, in fact, since Colonial times we have always been a very commerce driven material culture.
 

andy52

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I am curious as to your thinking on the emphasized portion of your statement.
Not arguing, just curious.
It would seem to imply that our forebears made most of what they had, when, in fact, since Colonial times we have always been a very commerce driven material culture.
For the most part, this is correct. There are examples of DIY bags and horns but the majority of the horns were made by professional makers. Leather shops and saddle makers were common and it would be my guess they also made shooting bags also.
 

Grenadier1758

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Any suggestions for these? As I look to transition into flintlocks I see the need for more space. The value part comes from the fact that with currency exchange and shipping you can add 50% on to the cost.

Something practical I.e. waterproof and that isn't going to readily spill things when I crawl through brush. For the powder horn I prefer plain so no scrimshaw is necessary. I'm just a guy who enjoys hunting through the wilds, no competitions and unfortunately no friends that shoot BP with me.
As much as I like to be period and historically correct, there are times when a more modern and practical solution needs to be addressed.

So, in keeping with @ghostdncr's suggestion to keep these items home made or repurposed from other items let's see what we can come up with. As far as a shooting bag, I have used military surplus bags of a useful size. A plain women's purse found in a resale shop can be turned into a useful shooting bag too. These bags often have a secure closure so the contents aren't getting scattered all over the countryside. I use a belt to hold one strap of the bag to my waist to prevent the bag from flopping around.

As far as a powder container goes, there are many options. Small individual containers of powder with a suitable load are good choices. I have seen condiment bottles with small tips used as powder containers. The small tips are good for dispensing powder into a measure. While some may express concern about a build up of static electricity setting off the powder, that is very unlikely. If you have a plastic (antistatic) powder container with a poor spout, that would be better. Of course, a cow's horn is better.

Look for other types of solution to your carry concern. I'm not going to come from the US to chastise you. If you come up with an acceptable to you solution, I am more likely to approve.
 

ghostdncr

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I am curious as to your thinking on the emphasized portion of your statement.
Not arguing, just curious.
It would seem to imply that our forebears made most of what they had, when, in fact, since Colonial times we have always been a very commerce driven material culture.
A good and reasonable question. It would've been more accurate to say "Making MY own gear extended MY knowledge base and GAVE ME a deeper connection to the roots of MY pursuit." It's easy to assume that my experience is not all that different from that of others; that making what gear one could might give most people a little deeper insight into making do with what was available. Any item self crafted tends to carry considerably more worth (to me) than a similar store-bought item.

Being born and raised in Appalachia, I was brought up in a culture that seldom disposed of anything. Items were repurposed (if at all possible) as a direct result of the abject poverty all around us, so making my own gear was both natural and something of a necessity at the time. In retrospect, doing it this way not only taught me the various skills needed, but also gave ME the impetus to further study the history of the items I was making and by extension, the periods in which they would have been in popular usage. Everyone else may see homespun gear in an entirely different light and want nothing to do with it, but I'm happy with how it's worked out for me.
 

Brokennock

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Apologies to the o.p.
I keep forgetting you aren't in the U.S. so colonial material culture here probably doesn't matter.....

Heck, it doesn't matter to most people here.
 

Notchy Bob

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I would recommend that you consider, or at least take a look at, the powder horns from October Country in the state of Idaho, USA. Their powder horns are simple, rugged, airtight, traditionally styled, reasonably priced, and they give you a choice of right or left side carry.

I have made a few simple powder horns, and I have bought a couple. I bought one of the October Country Frontier Horns a few years ago, and have no complaints or regrets. This is the one with the octagonal spout, priced at $81.11 USD. this photo is from the October Country Website:

OC Frontier Horn.jpg



Since I bought mine, they came out with another horn they call a Yellowstone. This one has a carved ring on the neck:

OC Yellowstone Horn.jpg

They sell the Yellowstone horn for $67.60 USD. I would consider it a "best buy" in the marketplace right now. Either of these horns should satisfy the most discriminating traditionalist, yet they are well suited for practical use. The only thing I would change would be the tip plug, which does not fit very well and does not look "correct," to me. Something whittled out of softwood makes a better and more authentic plug, and is a simple project for anyone with a pocketknife.

Most of the commercial horns you see are clunky, with poorly carved (or uncarved) necks and grossly oversized "acorns" on the butt. The horns you see above are very authentic. Custom horners can make anything you want, but they will be priced much higher.

October Country is probably best known for their leatherwork. I have not bought any of their bags or pouches, so can't comment from personal experience. I've never heard anything bad about them. My only issue with these is that October Country calls them "possible bags," which they aren't, but that's a matter of semantics. Check them out here: October Country Bags and Pouches

It's true, you get a great deal of satisfaction from making your own gear, but it is also true, as stated above, that not everyone was a craftsman, even back then. Traders carried finished powder horns to the remote frontiers.

Good luck, my friend. I hope you find what you need.

Notchy Bob
 

Brokennock

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I've been very happy with the 2 horns I've gotten from Corey Joe Stewart, he has an easy page,
But I'm not sure about international shipping.
He is on the ALR forum and Instagram,
So you should be able to reach him to ask fairly easily.
 

GoodRabbitPilgrim

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I would recommend that you consider, or at least take a look at, the powder horns from October Country in the state of Idaho, USA. Their powder horns are simple, rugged, airtight, traditionally styled, reasonably priced, and they give you a choice of right or left side carry.

I have made a few simple powder horns, and I have bought a couple. I bought one of the October Country Frontier Horns a few years ago, and have no complaints or regrets. This is the one with the octagonal spout, priced at $81.11 USD. this photo is from the October Country Website:

View attachment 98284


Since I bought mine, they came out with another horn they call a Yellowstone. This one has a carved ring on the neck:

View attachment 98286
They sell the Yellowstone horn for $67.60 USD. I would consider it a "best buy" in the marketplace right now. Either of these horns should satisfy the most discriminating traditionalist, yet they are well suited for practical use. The only thing I would change would be the tip plug, which does not fit very well and does not look "correct," to me. Something whittled out of softwood makes a better and more authentic plug, and is a simple project for anyone with a pocketknife.

Most of the commercial horns you see are clunky, with poorly carved (or uncarved) necks and grossly oversized "acorns" on the butt. The horns you see above are very authentic. Custom horners can make anything you want, but they will be priced much higher.

October Country is probably best known for their leatherwork. I have not bought any of their bags or pouches, so can't comment from personal experience. I've never heard anything bad about them. My only issue with these is that October Country calls them "possible bags," which they aren't, but that's a matter of semantics. Check them out here: October Country Bags and Pouches

It's true, you get a great deal of satisfaction from making your own gear, but it is also true, as stated above, that not everyone was a craftsman, even back then. Traders carried finished powder horns to the remote frontiers.

Good luck, my friend. I hope you find what you need.

Notchy Bob
I'd love to have a go myself, my problem is that I'm 30 and in a very busy period of my life between full time work, full time study (for my new job), trying to do up the house and yard of our run down place and manage a couple of toddlers. I don't have the time to do the things I love to do let alone start on other things at the moment.

I will look into these options though thank you.
 

Notchy Bob

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@GoodRabbitPilgrim

Do you know Keith Burgess? He is based in Australia and has a wonderful website: Woods Runner's Diary Blogspot

I know Australia is a very large country. I don't remember where you live, and I'm not sure about Keith, either. His blogspot is focused mostly on American colonial reenactment, but he is a very knowledgeable blackpowder shooter. He may be a good contact for you. I have corresponded with him a time or two on historical topics. He knows his stuff. It would not hurt to get in touch, if you haven't already.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob
 
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sawyer04

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I will always vote for self made, even if not historically correct. Making your own gear extends your knowledge base and seems to give a deeper connection to the roots of our pursuit. Just my $.02 of course, and I hope you find something that suits you!
It is not for everyone, I realize:: but I have been carrying stuff in my pockets and surplus canvas bags for years. I don't have the needs or funds to have fancy equipment for every weapon. I do have powder horn and shot flask; but for every weapon, naw.
If by some slim chance I would tan leather I would make equipment, but It is just to dang high for me to buy. unless reenactor oriented. The old timers had an array of pouches, flasks, horns and tools : when the weapon was used as a tool. That's not to say that a fair amount of them are not used today as a tool. What about a jacket with pockets for patch, ball, and powder source. Everything in it's place. No digging through a bag to find what is needed. I like bullet boards. Just pondering simple methods to enjoy the sport without breaking the bank.
 
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Travis186

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I bought a cheap horn from crazy crow and my possibles bag from track o da woof. There are probably better options. For deer I'm not planning on carrying the possibles bag or horn. I'll keep the charges in brass tubes I'll use as speed loaders, and extra roundballs and patches in a little snuff box tin in the pocket of my jacket. No need to take all the extra stuff.
 

brewer12345

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I made one of these Winsor Leather Belt Bag Kit — Tandy Leather, Inc.

Very handy size for a hunting setup. I have everything in there: short starter, patches, premeasured powder tubes, cleaning patches, pipe cleaners, jags, etc. I even made up a pattern from the kit and made one for my hunting buddy, although I used a homemade deer antler button for the closure. Not real hard to make, handy size, rugged for what it is.
 

rj morris

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when i got a flintlock i used my current bag and horn. use 3f for priming and charge i did nit need any new ass. exect a small srew driver for the hammer
 

Timber Wolf

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I have horns, but for most of my range shooting I just use a flask. I have several different kinds and shapes of flasks that all take the same thread-pitch spouts. Since I started in BP with revolvers it was natural for me to use a flask. I find them a very convenient and safe way to carry enough powder for a regular shoot and it fits inside my pouch. I have a very small one for 4f, round brass for 2f, and “Colt” type pistol flask for 3f so I can tell quickly what powder is in which. Also have a cheap plastic clear one for a spare but have not taken it out of the package yet. For single shot front stuffers I dispense from the flask into a small measure and it works fine. I also have funnel spout/caps for the standard powder bottles and use those on the line (mostly with Pyrodex P and RS).

Bought my main pouch from a nice lady crafts-person on eBay. I liked it so much I commisioned her to make me a matching belt pouch from the same material. She worked from scraps, and her prices were very cheap I thought. Have not seen her list anything lately so maybe she quit or can not get material. Off topic but she mentioned she learned the sewing trade from her Grandmother. She said her Grandmother sewed the original Gemini (I think) astronauts suits.
 

GoodRabbitPilgrim

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I use pre measured powder and carry balls loose in my pouch at the moment, but when deer hunting I rarely fire more than 1 shot and never more than 4. For bird and small game with shot I feel like I'll need more of both than I can fit in tubes.
 

Dale Lilly

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Oklahoma Leather has reasonably priced shooting/possibles bags.
 
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