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swamped barrel inlet

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hi all, have never done one, was wondering if the flats that are not seen are inlet straight or contoured to the barrel?? [ the bottom flat and next to side flats]
Some builds from what I have heard are inlet by making a curved (arc) under barrel inlet. The sides fit the flats, but the bottom diagonals and bottom don't. I make my builds so each flat fits the wood. I suggest don't skimp there, and do a less stellar job. U will be happier with a full fit inlet and so will the person who gets it after you!
Larry
 
As was pointed out, many old makers inletted for a good wood to metal fit on the side flats; and simply rounded out the remainder of the barrel channel. The contact points in the inlet being the corners of the unexposed flats. Some modern smiths and builders do it also. I dont. I like my inlet to be octagonal, because it leaves a little more wood in the forearm. When you take a forearm down properly (no more than 1/8" thick on the sides), that forearm is pretty flimsy... So I like the little extra bit of wood in the channel.

Having said that... I'm happy with 40% to 50% contact between the bottom flat and the wood. Less is ok when it comes to the lower diagonal flats. When drilling for the barrel pins, make sure the barrel is lightly clamped in the stock.

A good wood to metal fit on the side flats is important for looks. And a 90% wood to metal fit on the face of the breach is essential for proper recoil distribution. I also use accraglass on the rear two inches of barrel in the bottom of the channel, and on the rear of the breech and breech plug.
 
thanks guys, that is what i figured was the right way. :thumb: so am i right in thinking breech -muzzle -waist in that order on the down ?
To my way of thinking it does not matter HOW you skin a cat. Just make sure all flats bear on the wood. The stock will then hug the barrel like a pro.
Not everyone approches a process the same. Use what method is the easiest way for you to hog it out?
Larry
PS we need photos so you can get atta boys!

Larry
 
hi all, have never done one, was wondering if the flats that are not seen are inlet straight or contoured to the barrel?? [ the bottom flat and next to side flats]
I am somewhat skilled in the use of hand tools, and take care doing detailed work.
But I don’t think I could ever fully inlet a swamped barrel correctly without taking several months and ruining multiple stocks. The diverging and converging angles would leave me totally baffled.
I have a lot of respect for people who can do it.
 
hi all, have never done one, was wondering if the flats that are not seen are inlet straight or contoured to the barrel?? [ the bottom flat and next to side flats]
If I was in-letting a swamped barrel I would I would fit the sides closely to contour and glass bed the bottom three flats to straight contours. There will still be plenty of wood to fit the keys or pins through and one can never fit a flat a close by in-letting as one can mold them with glass bedding.
I always glass bed the tangs and lock areas underneath any way for strength and oil protection so a little more under the barrel isn't going to change the "traditional" nonsense aspect.
 
Inlet follows the contour of the swamped barrel. Here's one from my current build.
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PXL_20220716_171411186.jpg
 
If you are comfortable using a router, here's how one way to do it. I posted this awhile back. I use a trim router.

Here's my router set-up for doing swamped barrels. Lay the barrel on top of the blank and clamp 3/8" rails to it. Screw the rails to the blank. Use a 1/2" V-shaped bit with a 1/2" collar to route the channel. I take very shallow cuts. Sometimes I use a 1/4" straight bit to route the channel to depth first but you don't have to. The pictures below show this. Do a little scraping and square up the breech end and you're done. It takes me about 4 hours to get the barrel in.

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@sdilts , I understand the rails would guide the router for the side flat swamp, but what about the swamp depth? Are you just routing to the shallowest depth and finishing with chisel, or do you somehow have those rails shimmed underneath to match the swamp depth?
 
the shallowest depth and finishing with chisel
Yes… on a swamped barrel. I did this technique on my latest build and like Hatchet Jack, I used a saw for the side flats. But my “rails” are 3/8 x 1/4 and too flat to use a router. So I used a drill with a “stop” to drill down to the shallowest depth of my swamped barrel. Then used chisel, but it took me about 3 weeks to get the barrel down to the proper dept.
 

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@sdilts , I understand the rails would guide the router for the side flat swamp, but what about the swamp depth? Are you just routing to the shallowest depth and finishing with chisel, or do you somehow have those rails shimmed underneath to match the swamp depth?
I lay the barrel on top of the blank and then rasp the blank to follow the contour of the barrel.

Mule, I got theses rails from a local steelyard. I have seen them at hardware stores though.
 
That is a really good idea! I'm now thinking really hard about getting a router for the next one I build
 
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