NY percussion rifle ID help requested.....

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GANGGREEN

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I purchased a muzzleloader recently and the seller described it as a .35 caliber NY style percussion halfstock rifle. It's an attractive rifle with a Gulcher lock and it's in remarkable condition, but I'd sure like to know a bit more about it. The Gulcher lock is worn, but it appears to have the likeness of a hunter engraved on it. Other than the word "Gulcher" (faded) on the lock, there are no other outward marks or signatures. I haven't removed the barrel, but the lock does have a name/company stamped on the bridle. As far as I can tell, it's Wm. Smith & Co.. My intention was to clean it up really good (as indicated, it's already very clean) and to shoot it, but the .36 jags that I have won't go past the muzzle, so his ID as a .35 may have been accurate, or it may be a .34. I have some .350 balls, but don't really wish to force them down with a thin .010 patch for fear that they'll get stuck partway down the barrel. I've run a patch with the rifle's ramrod/jag down and it's clean, well taken care of in the past and I don't think there's any danger in shooting it though.

I guess what I'd like to know is if anyone has knowledge of a Wm. Smith & Co. riflemaker, if anyone can tell me based on architecture and accessories if this is consistent with a NY halfstock, what the approximate age would be and if anyone wants to venture a guess, what an approximate value would be. I have several .36 caliber guns and don't really wish to use this for hunting or even for plinking (other than to shoot it a few times at a target just because I can), so it's mostly a wall hanger for me, but I'd like to know what it is. Pictures to follow on a separate post.
 

GANGGREEN

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In the photo with the two muzzles, the gun in question is on the left and a Joe Schell .36 is on the right. Note too that the ramrod has been replaced with a synthetic rod.
 

mooman76

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Sorry to say I know nothing about it but you have a very nice looking piece there. I hope you get shooting soon and get your information you are looking for.
 

cositrike

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I purchased a muzzleloader recently and the seller described it as a .35 caliber NY style percussion halfstock rifle. It's an attractive rifle with a Gulcher lock and it's in remarkable condition, but I'd sure like to know a bit more about it. The Gulcher lock is worn, but it appears to have the likeness of a hunter engraved on it. Other than the word "Gulcher" (faded) on the lock, there are no other outward marks or signatures. I haven't removed the barrel, but the lock does have a name/company stamped on the bridle. As far as I can tell, it's Wm. Smith & Co.. My intention was to clean it up really good (as indicated, it's already very clean) and to shoot it, but the .36 jags that I have won't go past the muzzle, so his ID as a .35 may have been accurate, or it may be a .34. I have some .350 balls, but don't really wish to force them down with a thin .010 patch for fear that they'll get stuck partway down the barrel. I've run a patch with the rifle's ramrod/jag down and it's clean, well taken care of in the past and I don't think there's any danger in shooting it though.

I guess what I'd like to know is if anyone has knowledge of a Wm. Smith & Co. riflemaker, if anyone can tell me based on architecture and accessories if this is consistent with a NY halfstock, what the approximate age would be and if anyone wants to venture a guess, what an approximate value would be. I have several .36 caliber guns and don't really wish to use this for hunting or even for plinking (other than to shoot it a few times at a target just because I can), so it's mostly a wall hanger for me, but I'd like to know what it is. Pictures to follow on a separate post.
If you find out it’s.34” you could shoot a lot of lead if you bought 5lb OO buckshot!
 

Grenadier1758

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A dial caliper can be your best tool here. Affordable calipers are available and can measure both inside and outside dimensions and they are accurate enough for determining ball size. You might be able to take your barrel to a machine shop and they could use pin gauges to determine the land diameter of the rifle.
 

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