Have you defarbed your percussion revolver?

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stephenprops1

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"Do people remove all the markings from their vehicles, i.e., GMC on the front grill and tailgate? Would make as much sense as defarbing."




Back in the 1950's and 60's that was one of the first thing hod rodders did to their vehicles. Removed them, filled the holes and blended it all out. Guilty of that myself. It was our way of changing the appearance of something to conform with our own sense of esthetics. I feel defarbing of guns is just another way of changing the appearance of something we own to look the way we want it. I think the majority of people defarbing/ageing guns are not doing it to claim the gun is actually older than it is, but simply revising the finish to look the way they want it. Are some people going to do it for misrepresentation? these people are in the minority and more than likely not forum members. If people are going to be upset because I put a 327 with 3 dueces and a cam in it under the hood of my externally stock 29 tudor and accuse me of misrepresenting the genre of antique vehicles, that's too bad. THERE ARE ALWAYS people that are going to find something wrong with whatever it is we do and always have good solid reasons for telling us that we shouldn't be doing that. I'm building a precision muzzle loader for long range shooting, chassis type stock, high power scope, extra long barrel false muzzle etc. There are people who will tell me that's wrong, not in the spirit of black powder shooting etc. Think I care? No because this is my way of expressing myself. That's all revising the appearance/defarbing of a gun really amounts to, expressing our desire to have something we own meet our personal requirements of appearances.
Remember, Ricky Nelson said it best. "You can't please everyone, so you've got to please yourself."
 
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I gave my Uberti 1858 a nice patina and antiqued the grips:

1C2FBD3A-7381-4FDB-BC31-3C563627607A.jpeg


And on the recent Pietta 1860 I bought I didn’t like the looks of the shiny and reflective “oil slick” dark case hardening on the frame, so stripped only the frame and refinished with some cold blue to mimic more traditional case hardening:

64570023-8FC2-4A10-88DE-7B4B173C09F4.jpeg
 

Stantheman86

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I recently did a defarb of a defarb on my Spiller and Burr originally from Lodgewood. It was artificially aged but didn’t look right to me.

Besides, the opening for cap removal/addition was TOO small. I didn’t know why this was made like that when originals are 3 time the size. I reblued w/some brown added the metal and have some streaks to simulate the “twist” in the iron used for cylinders.

Regards,
James
Neat gun, I have a Pietta Spiller & Burr kit that I attempted and gave up on, I ended up using it to shoot 6 blanks on July 4th about 15 years ago.....just using it rough and half finished, forgot to clean it for about 5 years and it's a display gun now. Could probably bring it back if I soaked it in Kroil
 

Stantheman86

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A few more range trips using my flap holster to carry my Uberti Dragoon to the range and it will have some "holster wear aging " Uberti and Pietta use a fairly thin bluing it seems like .
 

M. De Land

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A few more range trips using my flap holster to carry my Uberti Dragoon to the range and it will have some "holster wear aging " Uberti and Pietta use a fairly thin bluing it seems like .
One of the things I find curious is that often an artificially aged gun will have the bolt track removed from the cylinder because they think it means the revolver is out of time, which it isn't. It's out of time when the bolt does not lift soon enough and the hand is trying to turn the cylinder before the bolt nose is clear of the notch. Actually I maintain a properly dressed bolt nose that drops a bit early and rubs on the cylinder is a benefit in that it aids in slowing down cylinder inertia before the bolt drops in the notch and slams against the back wall of it.
 

Stantheman86

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One of the things I find curious is that often an artificially aged gun will have the bolt track removed from the cylinder because they think it means the revolver is out of time, which it isn't. It's out of time when the bolt does not lift soon enough and the hand is trying to turn the cylinder before the bolt nose is clear of the notch. Actually I maintain a properly dressed bolt nose that drops a bit early and rubs on the cylinder is a benefit in that it aids in slowing down cylinder inertia before the bolt drops in the notch and slams against the back wall of it.
All of my new 2020-2021 dated Piettas are timed to drop the bolt early. I have 4 identical .36 Brassers that drop the bolt before the leade of the bolt stop.

I guess Pietta assumes people are going to crank back on the hammer with every ounce of their strength or will be fanning them. I know CAS shooters will have their guns "short stroked" because of the aggressive thumb cocking those guns will see.
 
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