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Gardening 2023

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Poultry manure has roughly twice the nitrogen which can "burn plants. So wouldn't only using half as much be about the same as the full measure of cattle manure?
Depends on what you grow. Too much on peppers and all you get are leaves. Too much on tomatoes and you get rot.
And yes, those chickens are going to be a big problem on your garden yield. They eat the bugs but peck a hole in everything you grow. Ask her to round them back up and get some Guinee hens instead. They eat the bugs but don't touch vegetables.
 
Have to disagree with what they told you. It's good, but...Chicken poop is one of the hottest fertilizers out there. Not a good thing. Unless fully composted it can burn and kill the seedlings. Find somebody that keeps rabbits and offer to clean it up for them. Rabbit poop is the best and can go directly to the soil at planting time. My second choice, for soil building purposes, would be sheep.
Best choices for chicken are to add it to compost and spread it sparingly after a year OR buy it fully composted. I get it composted at a value of 5-4-3 from Fedco in Maine, $25 for 40lbs. when I run out of my own.
I also compost with worms in my basement year-round. Worm poop can be added to seed trays at 10% for a noticeable boost in vigor. can be spread at apx. the same rate for in row plantings. And it costs nothing to feed worms leftover coffee grounds and shredded junk mail. Leftover plain pasta with no sauce is like candy to them. :thumb:
When I was a youngster 40s we raised chickens and other birds we always covered the coop floor with rice hulls. In those days hulls were free at the mill.
In spring planting time coop with the previous year's hulls and manure were spaded into the garden.
In our area of Sacramento valley, the soil is heavy with some clay, now the rice hulls are hard to compost but work well for loosening the soil, still not good for potatoes , peanuts or carrots,
but along with the old chicken manure did a good job of growing our garden crops.

Buzz
 
Alot of y'all have your winter cold but we have the summer heat to contend with as well.
Same here. Valentine’s Day is the traditional planting date for early spring gardens. We have had isolated frosty mornings in March, but not often. It’s worth taking a chance. Summer heat comes early and the bugs are relentless once they get started.

Notchy Bob
 
Same here. Valentine’s Day is the traditional planting date for early spring gardens. We have had isolated frosty mornings in March, but not often. It’s worth taking a chance. Summer heat comes early and the bugs are relentless once they get started.

Notchy Bob
Amen to the heat.
Buzz
 
I’m definitely in a warm spell of weather, and the buds on everything are starting to fill out. I’ve had raised beds here at the camp for years, most inside a sturdy fence. I use these beds for tomatoes, squash, and pole beans. And I still use the tractor and disc to plant a 35’ x 90’ sweet corn patch. Usually get a good harvest off that and the deer enjoy it too. I’ll start preparing the beds soon, but I won’t plant till after Easter. Not sure how many more years I’ll fool with the corn, gets to be a lot of work now.
 
Don't dare start too much yet as we are going to be gone for 2 weeks in mid March.... going on a cruise to the Bahamas. It was 23 below zero here in NE Wy yesterday morning!! Can't even get to our "good car" yet. Still about 3-4 ft of snow from the garage doors to our driveway... about 15 ft. No sense in getting excited yet.
Perhaps plant some snow peas.
 
Anyone ever plant potatoes in a bag, got a buddy who done this last year and said he will never put potatoes in the ground again. My granddaddy always planted potatoes on St. Patrick's Day.
 
I’m definitely in a warm spell of weather, and the buds on everything are starting to fill out. I’ve had raised beds here at the camp for years, most inside a sturdy fence. I use these beds for tomatoes, squash, and pole beans. And I still use the tractor and disc to plant a 35’ x 90’ sweet corn patch. Usually get a good harvest off that and the deer enjoy it too. I’ll start preparing the beds soon, but I won’t plant till after Easter. Not sure how many more years I’ll fool with the corn, gets to be a lot of work now.
I gave up on corn several years ago.Lots of work and the squirrels seemed to think it was all for them, kind of like your deer.
 
Anyone ever plant potatoes in a bag, got a buddy who done this last year and said he will never put potatoes in the ground again. My granddaddy always planted potatoes on St. Patrick's Day.
Never heard of doing that. I used to row crop potatoes, but not anymore. But I was thinking that if a bag works maybe just buy a bag of potting/garden soil, slice the top open and plant some. Plus a few slits in the bottom for drainage.
 
Never heard of doing that. I used to row crop potatoes, but not anymore. But I was thinking that if a bag works maybe just buy a bag of potting/garden soil, slice the top open and plant some. Plus a few slits in the bottom for drainage.
I believe that's pretty much how he does it, the next time I talk to him i will ask. He seemed pretty happy with the process.
 
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