European maple?

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52Bore

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Birdseye was popular/fad on British pieces 1820’s - 1840’s.
Photo of an 1825 piece.
3FE2AA0E-2BF0-42DE-87F8-35CD13572716.jpeg
 
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Hi,
Maple was used. I am not sure the species but there was a fad for using burl maple for stocks during the 1690s-1720s. English and European makers used it on expensive guns. The pistols below are by Andreas Dolep in London.
91FXFvb.jpg

y47XF9a.jpg


The burl wood had a tendency to check and crack and many maple stocked guns were restocked in walnut because of that.

dave
 
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Maple or Sycomore was used I certainly used Sycomore so called but essensialy a Maple wether plain or' knock your eye out 'curly . What is called' Sycomore' in the US is nothing like the UK stuff . I doubt there are many woods particularly fruit woods that are not at times used for stocks I've seen Ash & I've stocked in Mulberry, Kouri. and some white stuff a NZ native, No idea what it was but it's a blunderbuss now . I even stocked in West Australian Jarrah but that was only on a 'rock drill special' expedient as was another stocked in South African pine. .& Shedua a West Africa hardwood I believe , not sure but made several stocks from it anyway . inc appropriately a Nigerian 'Dane gun' 'After' the celebrated Jimmo Babatundi of Ikorudu lorry park fame (Ogan river school )flint lock of course & sporting the best three quarter inch galved water pipe barrel .(warranted not to burst more than once ) However that's not Europe & I digress .The Europeans seem to use some light wieght stuff well into percussion days that I can't recall its name . But the woodworms like it . I suppose in short you can stock in most any wood I once restocked a ' got up 'rifle on the river bank of the Whakatani from a driftwood snag timber . No clue what it was but it's still a serviceable stock since 1968. I did use European beech but it's tough stuff & heavy and rarely pretty if it can be quite pleasant with its distinctive fleck .Not sure if thats what you seek but it's about stock woods .
Regards Rudyard
 
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Maple or Sycomore was used I certainly used Sycomore so called but essensialy a Maple wether plain or' knock your eye out 'curly . What is called' Sycomore' in the US is nothing like the UK stuff . I doubt there are many woods particularly fruit woods that are not at times used for stocks I've seen Ash & I've stocked in Mulberry, Kouri. and some white stuff a NZ native, No idea what it was but it's a blunderbuss now . I even stocked in West Australian Jarrah but that was only on a 'rock drill special' expedient as was another stocked in South African pine. .& Shedua a West Africa hardwood I believe , not sure but made several stocks from it anyway . inc appropriately a Nigerian 'Dane gun' 'After' the celebrated Jimmo Babatundi of Ikorudu lorry park fame (Ogan river school )flint lock of course & sporting the best three quarter inch galved water pipe barrel .(warranted not to burst more than once ) However that's not Europe & I digress .The Europeans seem to use some light wieght stuff well into percussion days that I can't recall its name . But the woodworms like it . I suppose in short you can stock in most any wood I once restocked a ' got up 'rifle on the river bank of the Whakatani from a driftwood snag timber . No clue what it was but it's still a serviceable stock since 1968. I did use European beech but it's tough stuff & heavy and rarely pretty if it can be quite pleasant with its distinctive fleck .Not sure if thats what you seek but it's about stock woods .
Regards Rudyard
I stocked this Traditions Tracker 209 inline rifle in what I was told was “English Sycamore” or “lacewood”. Is it the wood you mentioned?
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Woods Wood it all varies tree to tree & parts thereof I see a Quilted effect but I never stocked modern arms unless you count an air rifle but it got a handrail stock . I don't do modern , maybe Sniders I stocked one of them & a 1846 Norwegian Kammer Lader its breach loader. Used plain Sycomore couldnt get the Birch the size needed Birch got used a lot all them 1991 Nagants unless US contracted & a raft or ML military got Birch stocks .
Cheers Rudyard
 
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The style or type of arm isn’t exactly pertinent to the identification of the wood used. Now days I don’t do much with modern arms either, but I did this one years ago on a whim. I *believe* it’s a cousin to the maple that’s referred to as English Sycamore as it’s nothing like American sycamore at all & yet not exactly like the maple I’ve worked with. My apologies for posting images of a non traditional Muzzleloader, I was only trying to show the type/appearance of the wood used in making its stock.
 
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I agree your rifle has outstanding wood choose what .It is a positive riot of contrasting grain very challenging but you 'nailed it as they say in cooking programs ' The US Sycamore' s seem quite different , the UK stuff called Sycamore is basically Maple & like maple seems to vary in density wood names seem to vary regionally & in the woodyards it's called different names locally its climate, soil type, growth rate all rather' mindboggling .'(boggles mine anyway )but I stock in it regard less .If there is a failing of maple it's the way it moves if constantly soaked one wet 13 day trip through classified wilderness( no tracks in it ) had it open below the lock inlet & away from the barrel but it moved back nice once it did dry even though the stock got blanched it took its colour again once dry .
Regards Rudyard
 

James Kibler

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Hi,
Maple was used. I am not sure the species but there was a fad for using burl maple for stocks during the 1690s-1720s. English and European makers used it on expensive guns. The pistols below are by Andreas Dolep in London.
91FXFvb.jpg

y47XF9a.jpg


The burl wood had a tendency to check and crack and many maple stocked guns were restocked in walnut because of that.

dave
This stock was actually made by Jim Kibler of Hanoverton 😉

It’s not completed. I haven’t worked on it for a number of years. It will have a serpentine sideplate, a thumb piece and be heavily wire inlayed.

Most of the metal parts are original Dolep work.

Yes, maple was used in Europe. I have been told “field maple” is one variety that was commonly used.

Jim
 
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Dragon side plates yes If I always think wire inlays are a bit 'gingerbread'. Brilliant stocking as expected I couldn't pick it but then on that scale Ime just a hack .
Regards Rudyard
 
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