45 Green Mt. LRH powder charge? 2f or 3f?

Discussion in 'Percussion Rifles' started by WVAED, Mar 16, 2019 at 10:11 PM.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Mar 16, 2019 at 10:11 PM #1

    WVAED

    WVAED

    WVAED

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    17
    I know, I will need to work up my own charge for my rifle. I was just wondering what you guys who have a fast twist 45 are using. I started with Pyrodex P (basically 3fff equivalent) at 80 measured grains (64.5 gr. weighed). I shot good but the recoil was very stiff. I am used to hunting with a 10 gauge shotgun and i think the 10 gauge was lighter on recoil than that load was. Anyone willing to share what their powder charge is? I am using 409 grain rcbs, rifle bullets, paper patched. Thanks Idahoron.
     
  2. Mar 16, 2019 at 10:23 PM #2

    Griz44Mag

    Griz44Mag

    Griz44Mag

    40 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2017
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    173
    Location:
    Republic of Texas, District of Manor
    Rule of thumb I was taught and go by:
    Average BP load: Caliber times 1.5
    So your 45 with 90 grains is WAY over what you need and will probably shoot better with a lot less powder.
    Only way to find out is to do it.
     
  3. Mar 16, 2019 at 10:37 PM #3

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    8,943
    Likes Received:
    354
    Location:
    Republic mo
    There is no rule of thumb that holds up over all calibers. One grain per caliber is to big for small and too small for big, same with 11/2 that works great for a few, but fails pretty fast. 1/3 ball weight is good but it too fails at big calibers.
    However one grain per caliber is a good place to start. In a 45 try 45 grains, it will probably be to little. A .45 weighs about 120 grains so 45 is about 1/3 of the weight.
    3f works good in most guns, definitely in those below .50.
    You will probably find 50 -55 is around your best, but I had a .46 that shot great with 79 grains.
    Although it’s a horror you just have to go to the range and start out at 45 and shoot groups to see which one is best.increase by five till group is best. Oh darn
    Then try different patch ball combos and so on.
     
    Logcutter and flntlokr like this.
  4. Mar 16, 2019 at 10:45 PM #4

    flntlokr

    flntlokr

    flntlokr

    Pilgrim

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    I usually start with calibre=powder. i.e. 40 to 50 gr. of 3F. I use a 30-30 casing as a powder measure for target stuff up to 100 yd or whatever, and it seems to shoot as well as I can. I have also shot it with 60 gr.; bigger bang, but no seeable difference in accuracy at short range.
    I always zero my rifles for 50 yd. only slightly highat 25 yd., usually a few inches low at 100; you have to figure out the 'Kentucky Windage' for each gun. Have fun.
     
  5. Mar 17, 2019 at 12:00 AM #5

    WVAED

    WVAED

    WVAED

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    17
    Is there a difference for these heavy conical bullets as far as powder? Round balls and conicals are a few hundred grains difference in weight. I am thinking of lowering the powder charge to 60 grains (volume) and seeing how well it shoots, then if I need to, move up some.
     
  6. Mar 17, 2019 at 12:09 PM #6

    Griz44Mag

    Griz44Mag

    Griz44Mag

    40 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2017
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    173
    Location:
    Republic of Texas, District of Manor
    For the heavy conical the powder by bullet weight may be a better starting point. The original question was for round ball, which is the lightest bullet for the caliber. Conicals add a lot of weight for the same caliber, almost an unlimited weight because there is no real restriction on how long you can make a muzzle loader bullet. The counter to that is the bullet is going to go a lot slower.
     
  7. Mar 17, 2019 at 2:40 PM #7

    bang

    bang

    bang

    40 Cal

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    31
  8. Mar 17, 2019 at 4:36 PM #8

    WVAED

    WVAED

    WVAED

    40 Cal.

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    17
    Thanks friend. The original question was not about round balls, the barrel is a fast twist and I mentioned the 409 grain bullet i was using. Sorry for the confusion.
     
  9. Mar 17, 2019 at 6:15 PM #9

    Idaho Ron

    Idaho Ron

    Idaho Ron

    58 Cal.

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2007
    Messages:
    2,180
    Likes Received:
    28
    I neglected to tell you I do use a limb saver recoil pad on my 45. I shot it without a pad and yes it was brutal.
     
    WVAED likes this.
  10. Mar 18, 2019 at 1:00 AM #10

    Woodnbow

    Woodnbow

    Woodnbow

    40 Cal

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    75
    60-70 grains should work very well. Obviously the rifle will handle much more than that but most shooters won’t. Or won’t very often. The weight and configuration of the rifle matters as well, in my Seneca .45 I shoot a 385 grain WFN over 50 grains 3f and it’s accurate and mild. In a .45 Whitworth or Rigby I might shoot a 500 grain bullet over 90 grains or so.
     
    WVAED likes this.

Share This Page

arrow_white