Wooden Bowls and seasoning

Discussion in 'Camp and Trail Gear' started by Sean Gadhar, Jul 7, 2016.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum by donating:

  1. Jul 7, 2016 #1

    Sean Gadhar

    Sean Gadhar

    Sean Gadhar

    69 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Messages:
    3,540
    Likes Received:
    33
    A nice old guy at the farmers market turns Local wood, wooden bowls and I bought 2 for the wife & one small for my pack. I got a little lost as to which bowl was what wood :redface: Spruce maybe?

    Anyway the bowls were unseasoned, I have been coating with food grade mineral oil as if oiling a stock (light coats with ever increasing intervals between). After 4 days I think I have a dozen coats in. Anyone have experience with seasoning wooden bowls? Guess I'm a bit unsure how far to go. It's not as if they were teak, I think I paid $32 for the 3.
     
  2. Jul 7, 2016 #2

    swathdiver

    swathdiver

    swathdiver

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    974
    Likes Received:
    1
    We just use one coat of mineral oil once or twice a year, they are those cheap woven salad bowls. Still look good.
     
  3. Jul 8, 2016 #3

    sidelock

    sidelock

    sidelock

    50 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Messages:
    1,367
    Likes Received:
    4
    Just ask the maker, I'd bet he knows. Spruce???? I doubt it, but good luck.
     
  4. Jul 8, 2016 #4

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Messages:
    7,862
    Likes Received:
    615
    Location:
    People's Republic of Maryland
    I've always used the same stuff, food grade mineral oil.

    I bought a wooden spoon once that had been seasoned with olive oil. Put it away for use the next spring. Mice got in and liked to nibble on it so I tossed it..., no idea if it was because of the olive oil as I didn't have anything with mineral oil where the mice were for them to leave alone. Maybe they would've liked the wood regardless of the oil, maybe not?

    :idunno:

    LD
     
  5. Jul 10, 2016 #5

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

    58 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Messages:
    2,517
    Likes Received:
    107
    Location:
    north of Golden Pond, NH
    Need cat! :rotf:
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  6. Jul 10, 2016 #6

    necchi

    necchi

    necchi

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    13,033
    Likes Received:
    165
    Location:
    Central Minn
    I'd say they're where they need to be.
    The key is drying well after washing,, leave'm out in the sun or at least exposed to a breeze till they dry whenever possible.
    The wood will tell ya when it want's more oil,, you'll know.
     
  7. Jul 11, 2016 #7

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    Messages:
    15,633
    Likes Received:
    361
    Location:
    Arkansas Ozarks
    Depends on your planned use. If oiled, do not ever put anything hot into the bowl. I grew up with the family using wood bowls for salads. The seasoning was always olive oil and vinegar. Afterwards they were wiped, never washed, with olive oil and put away for the next use. I use a wooden nogging for rondevouz that is not seasoned at all. It get a variety of uses from coffee to adult beverages. If seasoned the oil float and make the brew taste awful.
     
  8. Jul 11, 2016 #8

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    9,349
    Likes Received:
    713
    I do the contrary - vegetable oil for hot and beeswax for cold liquids. My wooden spoons and noggings are oiled while my gourds are finished with beeswax.
     
  9. Jul 13, 2016 #9

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

    70 Cal.

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    5,158
    Likes Received:
    100
    woodturners predominantly use either friction polish or salad bowl finish. Friction polish is equal parts shellac, denatured alcohol and boiled linseed oil. It is applied with a rag to the unfinished wood, while spinning on the lathe and heat created by pressure of the rag on the wood causes the mixture to heat, evaporating the alcohol, drying the BLO and shellac, leaving a nice luster on the wood. Salad bowl finish is a commercial liquid that leaves a food safe varnish type finish on the wood and is available from many paint and specialty wood working stores. (even Walmart) In my opinion, there is nothing more disgusting than using an unfinished wood cup and getting the flavor of past liquids bleeding out into the current contents. For instance hot cocoa from breakfast bleeding into your beer in the evening.

    I developed an interest in treen ware and started turning some things out myself on a lathe. Also want to try hewing out some bowls with an adz and gouges.
     
  10. Jul 14, 2016 #10

    Vaino

    Vaino

    Vaino

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2006
    Messages:
    7,939
    Likes Received:
    32
    Bought an 8 qt. porcelain enameled cast iron Dutch oven and using metal utensils is out, so made a large spatula type stirring stick out of sugar maple and used beeswax for a finish.
    Heated the wood w/ a heat gun and applied the beeswax until it wouldn't absorb further.

    Just made a paella and this utensil worked like a charm to stir the pot. Clean up was easy and the beeswax prevented any absorption.

    Previously used mineral oil, but now think bees wax is better......Fred
     
  11. Jul 16, 2016 #11

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Cannon MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    Messages:
    15,633
    Likes Received:
    361
    Location:
    Arkansas Ozarks
    Never experienced that.
     
  12. Feb 28, 2019 #12

    LANEY REECE

    LANEY REECE

    LANEY REECE

    32 Cal

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    DOWNSVILLE, LOUISANA
    I TURN WOODEN BOWLS ALL THE TIME ON WOOD LATHE AND PUT TWO COATS OF WALNUT OIL ON THEM. IF THE WOOD IS NOT DRIED PUT THEM IN PAPER BAG AND CLOSE IT UP TIGHT AND LET THEM DRY,AND HOPE THEY DONT CRACK. LANEY
     
  13. Feb 28, 2019 #13

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    9,349
    Likes Received:
    713
    Food-grade mineral oil is what I've seen recommended for wood bowls.
     
  14. Feb 28, 2019 #14

    just4fun63

    just4fun63

    just4fun63

    32 Cal. MLF Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Cedar Hills Utah
    Walnut oil. Recommend by the wood store for food contact. Works well
     
  15. Feb 28, 2019 #15

    kansas_volunteer

    kansas_volunteer

    kansas_volunteer

    45 Cal.

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    14
    I like walnut oil, too. Haven't run a scientific test, but it seems to developed a very mellow shade over time, more so than other things I've tried.
     
  16. Feb 28, 2019 #16

    Nyckname

    Nyckname

    Nyckname

    40 Cal

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2019
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    108
    Please don't shout, I have a headache.
     
    Shot deer likes this.
  17. Feb 28, 2019 #17

    LANEY REECE

    LANEY REECE

    LANEY REECE

    32 Cal

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    DOWNSVILLE, LOUISANA
    Did u hear me say anything? No u did not, but will take cap lock off, thanks u Laney
     
  18. Mar 3, 2019 #18

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    9,603
    Likes Received:
    847
    Location:
    Republic mo
    Well I do like a coffee stout and a chocolate stout:)
     
  19. Mar 20, 2019 #19

    David Veale

    David Veale

    David Veale

    32 Cal

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2018
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    Three Rivers, MI
    I've made a lot of woodenware, and would recommend using flax oil. This is the same thing as linseed oil, but for food it's typically referred to as flax. Walnut oil is also a hardening oil, though anyone with a nut allergy should obviously avoid it.

    The USDA approved (just like bisphenol A and a whole host of other "food grade" nasties!) food grade mineral oil isn't a good idea imho, for two reasons. First is that it remains liquid, and thus washes out and/or evaporates relatively quickly. Second is that as a petroleum derivative, I don't trust it. You'll find plenty on-line to scare you from using it if you look around.

    I've heard some suggestions that olive oil will also polymerize, but my own experience with it was that it turned rancid smelling before polymerizing, so I don't use it.

    The best way to treat with walnut or flax oil (make sure either is sold for food use; boiled linseed (aka flax) oil contains chemical drying agents you don't want in your food!) is to first make sure your bowl is *DRY* -- like sitting next to the wood stove for a month or so. If it's not dry, you risk cracking in the next step. Next, have enough oil on hand to immerse it, at least halfway. Heat some oil up on the stove. It's flammable, and can burn inside the pot, so be gentle with it, and don't leave it unattended. Once the oil is hot enough (above boiling temp), put your bowls in. Bubbles from air and moisture in the wood (even a dry bowl still has some moisture content) will start escaping from the end grain of the wood so long as the oil is hot enough. Eventually they'll stop, and your bowl will likely sink to the bottom. At this point, take your oil off the heat and leave the bowl inside as it cools. This will draw the oil deep into the wood grain. Turn the bowl every so often if it's not completely submerged, to ensure that no surface goes dry and cools without drawing in the oil.

    Finally... find a nice sunny window, and let the bowls sit there for a few months. UV light and heat will speed the polymerization of the oil as it hardens. Sitting on a shelf above a woodstove also works pretty well. Once you can rub it with a piece of white paper and not get any oil on it, you're ready for use. This treatment will last far longer than the mineral oil option, though it will still need occasional renewal. My "daily use" bowl starts to show signs of drying after about 1-2 years of use.

    You can of course skip the drying period if you're dying to use the bowl before the oil is cured, but you'll get a little oil in your food, and anything hot will cause oil to seep from the pores of the wood. But, unlike mineral oil, flax and walnut oils are actually really good for you!
     
  20. Mar 20, 2019 #20

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Black Hand

    Cannon

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    9,349
    Likes Received:
    713
    Believing pseudo-scientific information found online is much like believing in fairy-tales - until you can actually confirm the information, it is meaningless. There may be a microscopic grain of truth at the core, but the rest is histrionics and imagination. You may not like petroleum products, but the reality is they are no more or less dangerous than natural products - ultimately, there is more regulation and testing for manufactured products than many of the natural products you appear to trust implicitly, especially for products that will be consumed or used in medicines.
     

Share This Page



arrow_white