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Which Rifle?

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I have had a hankerin for a flinter for a long while. Budget has been an issue, as well as time.

So how about a thread?

I love kits, especially those with most of the inletting done (I don't have time to learn to inlet a barrel and lock).

I love the ease of take-down of my CVA with lugs and a hook breech, but how HC is it if I am trying to keep to an early 1800s?

My first choice would be an 1803 Harpers Ferry, but I also like the idea of keeping all or as many of my firearms at .50 as possible.

Then there is this:
Traditions™ Mountain Rifle Kit .50 Cal Flintlock

But how does it spark? Does the lock really work?
 
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I'll speak on the traditions since that's what I've owned and shot. They are a lower matket gun so fit and finish may be lacking as compared to some of the other guns you see but in my experience, they've all been really good shooters with working locks. Locks not the fastest and they may have a learning curve but I find mine reliable and effective. Accuracy is as good as any other gun I currently own. MHO
 
I have had a hankerin for a flinter for a long while. Budget has been an issue, as well as time.

So how about a thread?

I love kits, especially those with most of the inletting done (I don't have time to learn to inlet a barrel and lock).

I love the ease of take-down of my CVA with lugs and a hook breech, but how HC is it if I am trying to keep to an early 1800s?

My first choice would be an 1803 Harpers Ferry, but I also like the idea of keeping all or as many of my firearms at .50 as possible.

Then there is this:
Traditions™ Mountain Rifle Kit .50 Cal Flintlock

But how does it spark? Does the lock really work?
Traditions flint is often a little week and not as good as sparker compared to higher dollar guns you can replace the lock with a better quality
A bit higher is the Kibler kits, best quality on the market. In between is Track of the wolf, Pecotonic and Sitting Fox. All will put you in a good shooter with a bit of work.
Sitting Fox has some guns in the white, meaning assembled but you need to do final sanding on the wood, draw file and finish the barrel
Loyalist arms sells smoothbore mostly military, the barrel comes too bright and needs dulling, but I can’t brag enough about my loyalist lock.
 
Regarding budget, a good condition mass produced flintlock can be found with a little digging. Check the classifieds section here (not an ad; I don't have any flint guns for sale) and you'll likely find something that you'd be interested in for a price below or comparable to a new Traditions and often better quality.
CVAs in good condition can often be found for less than the price of a new Traditions and are very similar guns. Traditions is made by Ardesa, which used to make a lot of CVA's sidelock.

CVA and Traditions locks can also be improved with an early 1800s style lock from L&R that would pretty much drop in from what Track of the Wolf says. I think that would especially look nice on a halfstock, but bear in mind that's another cost in addition to the rifle cost.
CVA and Traditions locks I've had and observed in the past are consistent, amd reliable enough keeping in mind their cost.

Happy gun hunting to you! Congrats on getting the Flintlock bug. They're less finicky than lots of folks say. As previously stated there's just a learning curve when going from percussion to flintlock shooting, but you'll get the hang of it.
 
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Regarding budget, a good condition mass produced flintlock can be found with a little digging. Check the classifieds section here (not an ad; I don't have any flint guns for sale) and you'll find something that you'd be interested in for a price below or comparable to a new Traditions and often better quality.
CVAs in good condition can often be found for less than the price of a new Traditions and are very similar guns. Traditions is made by Ardesa, which used to make a lot of CVA's sidelock.

CVA and Traditions locks can also be improved with an early 1800s style lock from L&R that would pretty much drop in from what Track of the Wolf says. I think that would especially look nice on a halfstock, but bear in mind that's another cost in addition to the rifle cost.
CVA and Traditions locks I've had and observed in the past are consistent, amd reliable enough keeping in mind their cost.

Happy gun hunting to you! Congrats on getting the Flintlock bug. They're less finicky than lots of folks say. As previously stated there's just a learning curve when going from percussion to flintlock shooting, but you'll get the hang of it.
Or the hang fire 😀😁😂😃😄😅😉
 
1803 Harper, the only place you want to go is The rifle Shoppe.
All Barrels for these are 54 or 58. You will have to get a 50 cal barrel from a maker.
Jess used to use Green Mt, but I dont even know if they are around any more.
 
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1803 Harper, the only place you want to go is The rifle Shoppe.
All Barrels for these are 54 or 58. YOU will have to get a 50 cal barrel from a maker.
Jess used to use Green Mt, but I dont even know if they are around any more.
Green Mtn is still in biz, thats where Kibler gets his barrel blanks then machines his own profile
 
I have had a hankerin for a flinter for a long while. Budget has been an issue, as well as time.

So how about a thread?

I love kits, especially those with most of the inletting done (I don't have time to learn to inlet a barrel and lock).

I love the ease of take-down of my CVA with lugs and a hook breech, but how HC is it if I am trying to keep to an early 1800s?

My first choice would be an 1803 Harpers Ferry, but I also like the idea of keeping all or as many of my firearms at .50 as possible.

Then there is this:
Traditions™ Mountain Rifle Kit .50 Cal Flintlock

But how does it spark? Does the lock really work?
You want too keep everything .50 caliber that rules out the 1803 harpers ferry it would be ,54 caliber, Your worried about how HC your CVA is but a Traditions Mountain rifle isn't going to be any closer to HC. If you want a good HC rifle kit then you need to look at what Jim Kibler, Jim Chambers or Dunlap Woodcrafters offer. Yes they are more expensive but you are getting Quality American made parts. Kibler is going to be the easiest to assemble Chambers and Dunlap will take some more work. Save your money and get something good for your next rifle.
 
OP.

Absolutely nothing wrong with Traditions rifles.

I own several. Jukar's too. And planning to own one more here shortly. Traditions Frontier.

Traditions, Ardesa, CVA, Jukar, Pecatonica, The Rifle Shop, TOTW, Kibler, Chambers are all FAKE hc/pc rifles.

Buy that Traditions Mountain Rifle and enjoy it.

With the added benefit of not getting your nose clipped by low flying aircraft.
 
If historically correct is a definite criteria, then none of the production guns make the cut. Hard core would dictate a hand made arm; but that's a big budget issue. I'm a builder... and I'm pretty anal; so that's the perspective this comes from.

A correct Harper's Ferry will be .54 caliber. It's a good caliber, and doesn't need heavy charges to be effective on targets or game. But it will require many of the tools and skills of a builder. If you're handy with hand tools, and patient, you can do it. It's not as hard or scary as many think.

Chambers kits are correct, but they will also require some work, time, and patience. Properly assembled and finished, you'll have a beautiful gun that will outlast you.

I'm not a fan of guns and kits that are built by robots, but I would be remiss not to mention the Kibler kits. I don't care for the architecture of his Woodsrunner, but many are; and assembly is a no brainier. I prefer a good Southern gun, but a .45 is the largest caliber from him. The Colonial architecture floats my boat, and comes in a .50. The Kibler also finishes into a high quality arm that will outlast you and I.

Unfortunately, it comes down to the budget all too often. That's my opinionated opinion... for whatever it may be worth to you.
 
Supposing that someone did get the (apparently mediocre) Traditions with their less-than-perfect lock; why can't the lock be tweaked into better functioning?

What is the actual difference between a great and fast lock and one that is a few miliseconds slower? Could a few minutes with a dremmel make a difference?

My ideal outcome will be the economy Traditions, followed by a Kibler, followed by a Chambers followed by .......
 
Supposing that someone did get the (apparently mediocre) Traditions with their less-than-perfect lock; why can't the lock be tweaked into better functioning?

What is the actual difference between a great and fast lock and one that is a few miliseconds slower? Could a few minutes with a dremmel make a difference?

My ideal outcome will be the economy Traditions, followed by a Kibler, followed by a Chambers followed by .......
It's not a difference of milliseconds , it's a difference that's noticeable, especially when it comes to follow through. Yes, the lock can be modified; but that may require paying a capable gunsmith. You can do a search on the forum for modifications to a traditions lock, and find out what has worked for others. I know there are a lot of Traditions owners on this forum who are happy with their guns.
 
Supposing that someone did get the (apparently mediocre) Traditions with their less-than-perfect lock; why can't the lock be tweaked into better functioning?

What is the actual difference between a great and fast lock and one that is a few miliseconds slower? Could a few minutes with a dremmel make a difference?

My ideal outcome will be the economy Traditions, followed by a Kibler, followed by a Chambers followed by .......
Of course, the factory lock can be tuned to provide acceptable performance. It will be part of a maintenance process that will have to be continually tweaked as the lock ages.

The use of even a few seconds with a Dremel tool for many of us can make a big difference. The lock can go from frustrating to needing to be replaced. Only use the polishing wheels and even then only to remove burrs and casting roughness. Hones and flattening stones will serve the tuning process better.

The Traditions Rifles can be an affordable entry into the thrill of shooting flint lock rifles. The learning curve may be longer than with a rifle with an excellent lock.
 
Supposing that someone did get the (apparently mediocre) Traditions with their less-than-perfect lock; why can't the lock be tweaked into better functioning?
You might be able to improve it some, polishing the plate and maybe working the spring, but it is a basic lock. The unbridled tumbler and super-deep half cock notch work, but in my mind are to keep production simple and costs low. Certainly work ok and budget friendly, but has its mechanical limits.
 
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