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Is that i have a pedersoli Queen Anne. It,s a good shooter with some work on it. for what it is worth. What really ties me up is the originals...it boggles my mind that back then they could make such a thing nary coming close to the tooling we have today. One piece barrel and Flint lock...and hand made screws with no standard threading.. how in heck did they do it? And such circumstances whereas they had to supply Militia,s ? And in addition they were works of art. I guess this is what draws us to this stuff....
 
What i am trying to ask is how did they incorporate a flintlock and pan and lock plate into one piece as part of the barrel? I understand that the pan area was made as part of the barrel. but cripes... how did they do it?
 
Looking at early gunmakers craft. They could forge weld iron , they had copper to braze things togather , they bought imported files , but early on , they made their own files , chisels , screws and screw drivers , scrapers , etc.. I've never read that there was any standardization of threading dies and taps. Musta been whatever the purpose of the threds were for , those taps and dies , were made by the smith , or some smith down the street. Early on in my quest to try and understand , where did the raw materials come from , that early gunsmiths used? No supply houses around. In the 1980's , I visited an 1780's plantation near Franklin , Tn. The house chimneys , and other parts of the roof used copper sheeting as an interface between roofing materials and chimneys to insure water tightness. I asked the guy in charge if the copper sheeting was a new application , and he said the building was restored using the same materials as origionally used. From this , there would have been scraps from the roof work when the house was built , and nothing being wasted , the copper scrap went to a local blacksmith for brazing. I'm really in the weeds , and need to stop surmising , but no historical record reveals what was happening back then. Materials had to either be imported , recovered and repurposed , or made from local raw materials. .........oldwood
 
Is that I have a Pedersoli Queen Anne. It's a good shooter with some work on it. for what it is worth. What really ties me up is the originals...it boggles my mind that back then they could make such a thing coming close to the tooling we have today.

They were craftsmen with just the hand tools at hand, everyone needs to accept that fact. Real Talent ...

CRAFTSMEN

Buck
 
Truth to tell the box lock frame and the breech of a Queen Anne pistol is not hard for a competent blacksmith, the finishing would have been harder.
As for screws, they were cut by hand initially and a skilled gunsmith could produce surprisingly uniform screw threads, both for wood and metal.
The trick was to wind two wires or strings around the desired size stock, remove one wire and use the resulting gap as a guide to filing the groove on what became a tap, this was then used to cut a thread into what became a die plate for cutting threads; a little taper on the top end of the tap would take care of the clearance.
Haven’t got any reference to this but remember reading it years ago and it works as I’ve made replacement screws for very early guns using this method.
 
Let’s not forget that those craftsmen learned their trade from master craftsmen and that took years. It wasn’t like now as we have books and internet then stumble along with out guidance. Those worked under close supervision and had to refine their skills before being allowed to work alone. This is very uncommon now and makes the work seem even more complicated than it is.
 
As a member of NMLRA I have a little knowledge on the subject. Just like today, very few craftsmen back then made everything. Usually, a guy would build the stock, order a barrel from a barrel maker, the lock from a lock maker, etc. It was a rare individual that had the skill to make every piece.
Consider the master cratsmen today like Jim Chambers, Kibler, Mike Miller, and others whose rifles start at $3,000. Their barrels and locks come from other craftsmen.
 
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Is that i have a pedersoli Queen Anne. It,s a good shooter with some work on it. for what it is worth. What really ties me up is the originals...it boggles my mind that back then they could make such a thing nary coming close to the tooling we have today. One piece barrel and Flint lock...and hand made screws with no standard threading.. how in heck did they do it? And such circumstances whereas they had to supply Militia,s ? And in addition they were works of art. I guess this is what draws us to this stuff....
Once man learned to smelt metal from ore using a clay furnace , coal, charcoal fuel and bellows, adding alloying agents such as charcoal carbon to harden (iron) and low heat to draw temper, the rest pretty much follows with common sense.
I believe probably hammers, anvils and files the first and most important metal shaping tools as everything else spawns from them.
Sand casting was also very important to early gun making.
Tapered wood screws are fairly simple to make with triangle or round file and machine screws with a simple die ( hole in a piece of flat iron with two notches cut opposite each other and tapered with a file to cut/form consistent grooves) as it pulls is self through the die when rotated.
Screws seem hard because of their size or if body tapered but are actually formed while still rod stock that can be machined turned or handled much easier, threaded then cut to size and slotted.
I often look around my shop with natural gas heat, electricity , lights , lathes, milling machines, drill press, electric and gas welder (TIG, MIG, heat treating furnaces and a wall full of hung files of every description and realize had these early gunsmith had all this equipment capability they could have built the space shuttle !!! 😄
 
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What i am trying to ask is how did they incorporate a flintlock and pan and lock plate into one piece as part of the barrel? I understand that the pan area was made as part of the barrel. but cripes... how did they do it?
As far back as man has had settlements, they had a supply chain. During the flintlock era, you had a company that made only locks and one that made barrels. The builder would get dried lumber from the local lumber yard. Kind of had a quasi-kit to build the guns. Grab a piece of wood, mate it to a lock and barrel. Make a few small pieces and viola'. You have a gun. Extra cost for the fancy stuff. same as today. Semper Fi.
 
As a member of NMLRA I have a little knowledge on the subject. Just like today, very few craftsmen back then made everything. Usually, a guy would build the stock, order a barrel from a barrel maker, the lock from a lock maker, etc. It was a rare individual that had the skill to make every piece.

I too have a little knowledge on this subject being a Life Member of the NRA, NMLRA, several Museum's member and having written over 200 published articles on the fur trade, products and personal friend of the late Charles E. Hanson, Jr. All water under the bridge now ...

Charles E. Hanson, Jr. (Museum of the Fur Trade) wrote about this subject in several of his books. The term "cottage Industry" is thought of as a 1960's Hippy movement. But that's not true, the "cottage Industry" idea was found throughout history one example was seen in the gun building trade where one family were stockers, another family made locks & triggers, another barrels. Hanson talks about this industry during the production of the NW Trade Guns in England, France and other countries. Remember the term "cottage Industry" and the items produced were seen on a large scale . . .
 
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