Spring Turkey

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Roundball2319

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Called it in with a wing bone call that I made from my very first turkey. Shot it at 20 yards. 56 caliber muzzleloader with 7/8 oz of #4 shot and 55 grains of 2f powder. 8 inch beard. First bird with the smooth bore and first with a wing bone call.
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Ponderosaman

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Called it in with a wing bone call that I made from my very first turkey. Shot it at 20 yards. 56 caliber muzzleloader with 7/8 oz of #4 shot and 55 grains of 2f powder. 8 inch beard. First bird with the smooth bore and first with a wing bone call.
View attachment 75521
Wow! Amazing! The wingbone is an amazing call, and with the exception of gobbling can be used hands free. To me, all of the calls are less difficult to master than the wingbone, but it is the most versatile. Good for you.
 

jcp161

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Congratulations!!
What a great hunt.

John
 

R.J.Bruce

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Congratulations!! Great hunt with a small bore. Good eating ahead!! You should be proud of yourself. It's no small accomplishment. Well done.

Once again someone proves that it doesn't take a large bore smoothy to get the job done. So much of what we "KNOW" today about shotgunning comes from the age of waterfowling.

Here in America the club butt fowlers & the Hudson Valley fowlers, both large bores, and both used for water birds, merged into large bore percussion smoothbore guns used for the same purpose. Once the mid-20th Century showed up, with its "Magnumitis" ideology, the small bores, ie. the 24 gauge, the 28 gauge, and the 32 gauge kind of got lost as specialist weapons, only to be used by "EXPERTS".

I am in the process of saving up for a 61" long, 28 gauge fowler barrel that will be similar to the barrel design of a Type G, Carolina trade gun. 0.550" bore diameter. It will be made into an Eastern Pennsylvania barn gun, brass-mounted, early Ketland flintlock, ambidextrous, windage-adjustable brass bead front sight, Lowell Haarer-style ghost ring rear sight mounted on the tang.

Breech/0"/1.1248" octagon (0.2874")
Breech/7.75"/0.852" octagon (0.151")
Transition/11.5"/0.732" round (0.091")
Waist/59.5"/0.660" round (.055")
Flared Muzzle/61"/0.768" round (0.109")

There are wedding bands at the 7.75" point & 11.5" point from the breech. The numbers in parentheses indicate barrel wall thickness. Weight of finished fowler should come in at around 7-7.5 pounds.
 

Roundball2319

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SOUTHERN COLORADO
Congratulations!! Great hunt with a small bore. Good eating ahead!! You should be proud of yourself. It's no small accomplishment. Well done.

Once again someone proves that it doesn't take a large bore smoothy to get the job done. So much of what we "KNOW" today about shotgunning comes from the age of waterfowling.

Here in America the club butt fowlers & the Hudson Valley fowlers, both large bores, and both used for water birds, merged into large bore percussion smoothbore guns used for the same purpose. Once the mid-20th Century showed up, with its "Magnumitis" ideology, the small bores, ie. the 24 gauge, the 28 gauge, and the 32 gauge kind of got lost as specialist weapons, only to be used by "EXPERTS".

I am in the process of saving up for a 61" long, 28 gauge fowler barrel that will be similar to the barrel design of a Type G, Carolina trade gun. 0.550" bore diameter. It will be made into an Eastern Pennsylvania barn gun, brass-mounted, early Ketland flintlock, ambidextrous, windage-adjustable brass bead front sight, Lowell Haarer-style ghost ring rear sight mounted on the tang.

Breech/0"/1.1248" octagon (0.2874")
Breech/7.75"/0.852" octagon (0.151")
Transition/11.5"/0.732" round (0.091")
Waist/59.5"/0.660" round (.055")
Flared Muzzle/61"/0.768" round (0.109")

There are wedding bands at the 7.75" point & 11.5" point from the breech. The numbers in parentheses indicate barrel wall thickness. Weight of finished fowler should come in at around 7-7.5 pounds.
That is a fine vision your putting together. I can't wait till you post it's progress.
 
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