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Question on Water (Humidity) Resistance of Powder

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morehops52

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I read here quite a while ago about fg thru fffg powders having a slightly water (humidity) resistant coating on them while ffffg did not. They were specifically referring to ffffg being used in a flinty pan and its tendency to pick up moisture and turn to soup. They were recommending fffg or even ffg and noted its coating. I have mentioned this in my posts before but I have never seen it mentioned again elsewhere. I tried internet and forum searches but haven't found anything more than a graphite coat being added. Can anyone help me with some actual info on whether there is an actual resistant coating applied? I wouldn't think graphite would be of much help but it wouldn't be the first time I've mis-thunk.
 
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I read here quite a while ago about fg thru fffg powders having a slightly water resistant coating on them while ffffg did not. I have mentioned this in my posts before but I have never seen it mentioned again elsewhere. I tried internet and forum searches but haven't found anything more than a graphite coat being added. Can anyone help me with some actual info on whether there is an actual resistant coating applied? I wouldn't think graphite would be of much help but it wouldn't be the first time I've mis-thunk.
Maybe you are looking for resistance to humidity. Water tends to dissolve blackpowder.
 
Maybe you are looking for resistance to humidity. Water tends to dissolve blackpowder.
You are correct as that was what the OP that I read was referring to. Thank you for the correction. I edited my OP to reflect that.
 
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Friend,
Your right. there is no humidity resistant coating for any powder.
Condensation is real and happens. That condensation happens too metals. The powders that are subject to that condensation are not specific , because condensation is water, and water is bad for powder,, ok(?)
There are methods to help alleviate that condensation that is/are specific to our traditional firearms.
The "magic" waterproof powder you seek is not available. Your care of, your firearm and it's conditions "can" help with it's ability to fire in what would be considered wet conditions.
I'm not trying to be "snarky", that's just 300yr old info. repeated again.
 
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Of course 300 year old wet powder when dried can still go bang. 4f is more susceptible as being smaller grained there is more surface area.
 
Friend,
Your right. there is no humidity resistant coating for any powder.
Condensation is real and happens. That condensation happens too metals. The powders that are subject to that condensation are not specific , because condensation is water, and water is bad for powder,, ok(?)
There are methods to help alleviate that condensation that is/are specific to our traditional firearms.
The "magic" waterproof powder you seek is not available. Your care of, your firearm and it's conditions "can" help with it's ability to fire in what would be considered wet conditions.
I'm not trying to be "snarky", that's just 300yr old info. repeated again.
Did not take your answer for snarky. It is correct info and I'm not looking for any magic powder. My Q concerns that somebody on this forum (I don't belong to any other) posted what I referred to above. So where did that "info" come from? That's what I'm trying to find out. If it's total BS then I am guilty of passing along misinformation which I always try to avoid. That's what prompted my Q. If indeed it is at least partially true then I'm trying to find the source.
 
Black powder is rather resistant to humidity but maybe not quite completely. I have primed with 4F and hunted in the pouring rain and still got an instant "BANG"! I never took any special precautions to protect the powder and absolutely never had to dump prime and prime again. I simply used my body position, arm pit and occasionally the skirt of my hunting coat. Now if the gun has been fired already, anything you put into the lock's pan will turn to slush. The fouling sucks in humidity/water like a tornado and destroys any dry powder added.
 
Did not take your answer for snarky. It is correct info and I'm not looking for any magic powder. My Q concerns that somebody on this forum (I don't belong to any other) posted what I referred to above. So where did that "info" come from? That's what I'm trying to find out. If it's total BS then I am guilty of passing along misinformation which I always try to avoid. That's what prompted my Q. If indeed it is at least partially true then I'm trying to find the source.
That would be the works of Bill Knight. aka; the Mad Monk his 9 sections of documents are not easily found today but well worth the reading
 
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The graphite coating on powder serves roughly the same purpose as the tube of graphite you squeeze into your padlocks or use on the axles of your Cub Scout's 'Pinewood Derby" racer. it smooths things out so they don't rub or bunch up.
 
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