Prettiest Cap and Ball

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TFoley

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I notice when looking at it that it has the dip down to the barrel that I’m complaining about on the cap and ball pistols. It must be the extra length and extra hardware required for loading that is unpleasant to my eye.
As person who spends time using three languages most days, only one of which might be English, but is not guaranteed, I'm intrigued by your comment about the 'dip' of which you make much mention.

I'd be grateful to discover what that feature might be, so that I can avoid it, if necessary. It's not like 'the shoulder thing that goes up', is it?

This is my Ruger Old Army, made in 1986 and regularly shot by me ever since. Has it got your unwanted 'dip'?

1619708423045.png
 

Ponderosaman

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As person who spends time using three languages most days, only one of which might be English, but is not guaranteed, I'm intrigued by your comment about the 'dip' of which you make much mention.

I'd be grateful to discover what that feature might be, so that I can avoid it, if necessary. It's not like 'the shoulder thing that goes up', is it?

This is my Ruger Old Army, made in 1986 and regularly shot by me ever since. Has it got your unwanted 'dip'?

View attachment 75167
1619708514954.png
 

terrycrogers

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First of all, a photo of the front of the recoil shield with the cylinder removed is a must.

Yes, it can be repaired but it will not be cheap. Shooting heavy loads in a brasser tends to imprint the rear cylinder ratchet into the frame. With hammer down or at full cock there will be considerable cylinder end play. At half cock there should be considerably less because the ratchet does not fit into the damaged portion of the recoil shield. A very thin steel shim washer the same size/diameter as the damaged portion of the recoil shield can be silver soldered in place so as to obviate the damage, but the barrel/cylinder gap will have to be addressed.

The arbor is steel and is pinned into the brass frame, the pin being visible when the hammer is at full cock. It can be drilled out, the arbor reset in its threaded hole with Loctite, and a new pin installed. Normally an arbor in a brass frame works loose during the ramming of the ball into the chambers of the cylinder due to excessive force using oversized balls.

High Standard used Uberti parts that were finished by HS in the US. Although marked Griswold & Gunnison by HS, it is nothing more than an 1851 Navy .36 with a part round/part octagon barrel. Since it was manufactured prior to both Uberti and Pietta going to CNC machining, internal replacement parts will be very hard to find if needed.

If it was mine, it would be a display item only as it has seen better days and not worth the money to restore it, and even if restored it won't be original. Prior to the pandemic, Pietta marketed a G&G .36 that is CNC machined and replacement parts were readily available. I have one but do not shoot it. I only shoot a few steel framed revolvers in my Pietta .36 collection.

Regards,

Jim
Hello again. Here’s a picture of the the front of the recoil shield. As you suspected, there is evidence of the excessive charges. The cylinder has left imprints of the ratchet and pins between the nipples. This is a a wall hanger as I am not going to fix it. I have a steel framed 1851 now and will adhere to the recommended loads. Ah, hard learned lessons of youth. Thanks very much for your help!
 

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JohnnieT

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Hello again. Here’s a picture of the the front of the recoil shield. As you suspected, there is evidence of the excessive charges. The cylinder has left imprints of the ratchet and pins between the nipples. This is a a wall hanger as I am not going to fix it. I have a steel framed 1851 now and will adhere to the recommended loads. Ah, hard learned lessons of youth. Thanks very much for your help!
My first cap and ball revolver was a brass frame gun, and I always erred on the side of light loads because of that issue. Even now in my steel frame guns I shoot on the light side. I’ve so far avoided any damage to my guns, but time will tell on the brass Remington (it’s got about 18 years on it now).
 

B P Arn

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A wedge spring pin can be made from a finishing nail.

Cut the head off a slightly oversized nail. Chuck it in a drill press, and hold a file to it until it has a slight taper that will fit into the wedge and spring, holding the spring in place. Drive the pin in place. Trim it off, then touch up with some cold blue.
 

Frontstuffer

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Beautiful case! What is Bill's turn around time ?
I got lucky on this case. It was one that a customer had canceled on, so Bill listed it on the Colt forum in the classifieds. Consequently, there was no wait time. The only time I ordered a double case from Bill, which was maybe 2 years ago, I think it was between 4 and 5 weeks turnaround.

His cases are historically accurate since he has spent a lot of time studying various originals that Colt contracted for back in the mid
19th century. Although most original cases made for the American trade used African mahogany, one can also order oak or walnut if they prefer. The cases are lined in woven baize cloth like the originals and not velvet like a lot of modern cases. London-made Colts were sometimes cased in Oak. They always feature 4 screw brass hinges and brass mortised locks. In fact, if you are getting the cases for original antiques, he offers artificially aged cases to better match the guns. No one that I am aware of makes more historically authentic cases than Bill Shumate.

Cheers
 
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Ponderosaman

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Do some of the repro guns have the slotted cylinders so all six cylinders can be safely carried loaded?
 

Zonie

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Remington used 6 slots on the rear of the cylinder to trap the nose of the hammer. It was one of the changes they made when they designed the "New Model Army and Navy to comply with the Army's requests after the Army first rejected the revolver.
 

Ponderosaman

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Single shot front loader is something to not overlook. Simple as can be and a hoot to shoot. enjoy.
I’ve thought the single shots would be a really fun way to get into the flintlock game. I really enjoyed reading the thread on here where the guy documents his pistol build. Great looking gun.
 
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