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Original Swiss Jaeger, any info. on maker ?

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Relic shooter

Decades of bringing worthy orig. ML back to life
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I have an original .70 cal. Swiss Jeager that was originally a Flintlock then converted to percussion.
The lock plate is faintly scroll-engraved with the name Depre' in Geneva & bottom of the proofed barrel is stamped Blacmon Motagny.

Anyone have any info. on builder Depre' in Geneva or Blacmon Motagny ??

This rifle with it's 34" long rifled & swamped barrel is much longer than other original Jeagers I've collected, shot & observed.

The still perfect bore on this barrel has 16 groove rifling with 7/8 twist in it's 34"& should be a tack driver !
This rifle weighs in at just 7.25 lbs.
It has several usual features that leads me to think it might have been built to be a long range military sniper rifle.
The sport of long range target shooting was mostly reserved for the wealthy during the flint era & those folks normally had more ornate firearms built & were also weighed much more than this rifle.

The rifle weighs in at just 7.25 lbs.
This unusual rifle lacks any fancy embellishments that are normally seen on most custom Jeagers of that era, however it does have nice fiddleback figure through the whole length of it's walnut stock.
Sights on all of the Jaegers I've owned or observed have been coarse enough to be used in lower light forest conditions & often have just one tip-up rear sight blade.
This rifle has very fine sights & two extra rear flip-up leaves on the rear sight & a very fine front sight blade with a 'very long' sight base to drift for windage adjustments.

As photos show, the lock was setup for rapid removal. The lock is retained by a single thumb-screw & when loosened the front of the lock-plate pivots out on a metal hook & receiver setup in-letted in the wood recess. The thumbscrew would certainly catch on clothing if carried for hunting.
Possibly the rifle was designed for rapid firing, fast flint changes & lock cleaning ??

The unusual ball shaped protrusion on forward end of the rifle's trigger guard indicates it was designed to be used with a specific type of rest.
Anyone stateside or abroad on the forum have any input on this Swiss rifle's maker ???
Much thanks,
Relic shooter
No I haven't fired this rifle.. Unfortunately wear & tear on my 80 year old carcass advanced much faster than the rifle. :)
 

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I found that in the New Stöckel. Unfortunately nothing with Genf. I keep searching.
Many thanks for your efforts to lookup the .70 cal. flint to perc. converted rifle maker Depre' in Geneva & barrel stamped Blacmon Motagny.

I have one additional .70 cal. percussion Danish jaeger that is signed I.C. Haugaard in Kiobenhavn, now called Copenhagen. I'm including a couple of photos of this rifle.
Does your book have any information on him ? Back in my younger days this was my go-to rifle for match competition & big game hunting.
We're fortunate to have a forum with members who are willing to share their information.
Relic shooter
 

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Well don't be at your wits end. There seems to be a number of these large bore similar rifles all in the circa 1830/40 or so range & similar style. I've one I recently bought & one better piece in for restoration , again about 12 bore . suggests that Wild Boar where the intended target , the better rifle has a sliding tool box.& bears' Hertzberg' cant pick the maker. I said wild pigs but perhaps Bears could be the quarry .. Not much help but perhaps some Regards Rudyard
 
Thanks again Bayer 1957, your information is a big help :thumb:
About 6 years ago I corresponded with Curator of the Arms Museum in Copenhagen about the I.C. Haugaard Jaeger, he told me that his records showed the Haugaard family had a long military history as Master Armorers & gun builders for the Crown but didn't offer any dates.
Your information verifies this family has been building firearms for along time.
This Jaeger is very well constructed & the lock & triggers remain tight as new & believe it may be military as it's fairly plain & is similar caliber to military rifles of that era.
It's been fun hunting & competing with firearms like this that have seen soo much history. I acquired this rifle in California about 40 years ago, possibly came across the pond with gold rush immigrants? Considering it's perfect bore & excellent condition it have belonged to a long line of shooters.
Thank you,
Relic shooter
 
Thanks again Bayer 1957, your information is a big help :thumb:
About 6 years ago I corresponded with Curator of the Arms Museum in Copenhagen about the I.C. Haugaard Jaeger, he told me that his records showed the Haugaard family had a long military history as Master Armorers & gun builders for the Crown but didn't offer any dates.
Your information verifies this family has been building firearms for along time.
This Jaeger is very well constructed & the lock & triggers remain tight as new & believe it may be military as it's fairly plain & is similar caliber to military rifles of that era.
It's been fun hunting & competing with firearms like this that have seen soo much history. I acquired this rifle in California about 40 years ago, possibly came across the pond with gold rush immigrants? Considering it's perfect bore & excellent condition it have belonged to a long line of shooters.
Thank you,
Relic shooter
This is the proof mark on bottom of the Danish Jaeger barrel, anyone recall seeing this mark before ?
Thanks much,
Relic shooter
 

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My Good Relic
I stumbled across this auction
https://live.amoskeagauction.com/m/lot-details/index/catalog/18/lot/7655While it does not look like your rifle, the following caught my eye

”The lock is actually hand-detachable with a “wingnut” style screw protruding from the left stock flat …”

perhaps you could contact the auction house….

Thanks Shunka,
I've occasionally seen a wingnut used on heavy percussion target rifles like the beautiful rifle in the links photo.

This big bore Swiss rifle is the only light weight off-hand rifle I've run across in my years of collecting with a lock attached by a wingnut.
Due to this rifle's flint era manufacture, exceptionally fine sights & .superb 70 cal. rifled bore, a caliber that was typical of the military of that era, I believe it was likely used as a sniper rifle.
Relic shooter
 
There is a Bool about Swiss Gunsmiths. Unfortunately I don`t have it. It is also Priceless.

https://www.zvab.com/buch-suchen/titel/schweizer-waffenschmiede-jahrhundert/autor/schneider-hugo/

Priceless? I don't think so. EUR 478,60 - around $500.

A couple of other things - please point me to the evidence that it was formerly a flintlock - I can't see anything on the lock that suggests that. And TBH, the likelihood that a barrel maker in Montagny, in Switzerland, is called 'Blackmont', is rather odd. Can you show us all the markings on the barrel?
 
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Over on gunboards.com we have a number of Swiss nationals who collect Swiss firearms of all kinds - look at the Swiss forum. I'd be very surprised if one of them was unable to help you. BTW, 'Genf' is the German name of Geneva.

T Foley your Swiss forum tip is much appreciated, I'll definitely look this forum up.
I'm member of a Norwegian ML forum but had no luck there.
Most of my collection was acquired decades before the internet, now I'm a relic. 😂
Relic shooter
 
Priceless? I don't think so. EUR 478,60 - around $500.

A couple of other things - please point me to the evidence that it was formerly a flintlock - I can't see anything on the lock that suggests that. And TBH, the likelihood that a barrel maker in Montagny, in Switzerland, is called 'Blackmont', is rather odd.
Yes I agree that name stamped on bottom of the barrel is unusual.
On close examination it's very clear that this was originally a flintlock & converted to percussion.
Rear view photo of the lock shows where the frizzen screw was located.
During the conversion process some of the maker's signature was made less visible.
Odd rifle.
Relic shooter

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