Interesting percussion musket - no idea what it is?

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Shotgun232

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I was at a local auction and saw this interesting musket for sale. Ended up winning it for $300 (i am guessing I paid too much).
Anyways, i have no idea what the musket is, it looks like it was maybe a conversion piece from flint lock, as it has this weird percussion cap lock/safety. From what I know about muskets - it looks French?

Also, the barrel is clearly a type of Damascus steel barrel, running around .700 in diameter. I did check the bore with a bore scope and it appears to be in good condition - is not loaded.
The only markings on the gun are a "77" on the base of the barrel and a "5" on almost all of the brass parts - at least i think it is a "5", could be a makers mark?

Please let me know if you have any ideas what this gun is - and if i paid too much for it.....

I bought it because it was interesting - and I may be interested in shooting it....

Thanks,
Mike
 

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Shotgun232

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I was at a local auction and saw this interesting musket for sale. Ended up winning it for $300 (i am guessing I paid too much).
Anyways, i have no idea what the musket is, it looks like it was maybe a conversion piece from flint lock, as it has this weird percussion cap lock/safety. From what I know about muskets - it looks French?

Also, the barrel is clearly a type of Damascus steel barrel, running around .700 in diameter. I did check the bore with a bore scope and it appears to be in good condition - is not loaded.
The only markings on the gun are a "77" on the base of the barrel and a "5" on almost all of the brass parts - at least i think it is a "5", could be a makers mark?

Please let me know if you have any ideas what this gun is - and if i paid too much for it.....

I bought it because it was interesting - and I may be interested in shooting it....

Thanks,
Mike

Here are some more photos, of the muzzle end and front sight..
 

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Feltwad

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Continental most likely French or German with a continental patent for holding a top hat musket cap on the nipple although I cannot see the front view of the hammer most of this type had a flat nose .
Feltwad
 

zimmerstutzen

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I know Germans were big on safety mechanisms to prevent accidental discharges on their horse pistols. Parts of of it resemble the Austrian Lorenz muskets. But many muskets across Europe were so similar, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart.
 

Einsiedler

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Very interesting musket. Thanks for sharing. Same type of mechanism on one of my custom Jäger rifles. This lock from Rifle Shoppe. Can’t remember who they attribute it to.



 

Shotgun232

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I know Germans were big on safety mechanisms to prevent accidental discharges on their horse pistols. Parts of of it resemble the Austrian Lorenz muskets. But many muskets across Europe were so similar, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart.
One interesting thing that i noticed was the end of the side plate is round - not drawn to a point. from what i can tell this is a later feature. So it is probable that this rifle is a mismatch of parts?

Any idea on the vintage? I.e. 1860s?
 

Shotgun232

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Continental most likely French or German with a continental patent for holding a top hat musket cap on the nipple although I cannot see the front view of the hammer most of this type had a flat nose .
Feltwad
I took some pictures of the side plate, trigger guard and trigger. There are some markings on them....
 

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rickystl

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Here is a lock from my collection. I posted this maybe a year ago. Looks very similar to the one on your musket LOL.

Rick001 (Medium).JPG 002 (Medium).JPG 006 (Medium).JPG
 

Shotgun232

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Good info. From another group, it was brought that the base rifle was most likely a 1809 Potsdam, that was converted to percussion and sold to the US during the civil war. I found this link that describes some of that: https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=6281

So it probably started life as this musket, but was then converted with different stock and side plate. Wondering if this conversion was done in the US, or Europe - as the side plate appears to be from Europe according to your post on the side plate....

So - what do i need to do to get this gun ready to shoot?
 

rickystl

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That's interesting. I was always of the opinion that this style of lock was only seen on Jaeger/hunting style rifles. My lock is actually musket size. So I'm thinking it may be from the same location. You may have solved the mystery ? LOL

Rick
 

Shotgun232

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That's interesting. I was always of the opinion that this style of lock was only seen on Jaeger/hunting style rifles. My lock is actually musket size. So I'm thinking it may be from the same location. You may have solved the mystery ? LOL

Rick
Well, i will let you know how the lock works, as i intend on shooting this old gal...
 

Heelerau

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I too think it is a potzdam converted to percussion. Interesting safety device, I have seen the like on some fowling pieces that have been percussion converted ver early on in the percussion era.
 

Gene L

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A guy on another forum had a Charleville that had a similar device on it, but the hammer on his was huge. It also was a conversion to percussion.
 
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