Fire swaging a cylindrical into a hexagonal

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

Widows Son

40 Cal
Joined
Jul 18, 2020
Messages
144
Reaction score
106
Hello all. I have another question regarding loading a Whitworth. It is well demonstrated that a cylindrical bullet be obturated into a hexagon by the energy of the exploding powder. But….does this require a cupped or hollow base or does it still work with a flat bottomed projectile?

Regards
 

nkbj

Cannon
MLF Supporter
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Messages
7,946
Reaction score
971
Hello all. I have another question regarding loading a Whitworth. It is well demonstrated that a cylindrical bullet be obturated into a hexagon by the energy of the exploding powder. But….does this require a cupped or hollow base or does it still work with a flat bottomed projectile?

Regards
Whitworth bullets, being long and heavy, have enough inertia to initially resist forward movement. The rear of the bullet compresses while it is trying to push the front part on down the barrel. The lead squishes sideways like smashing an uncooked biscuit on the kitchen counter. Over time, traversing a few inches of barrel, the squishing effect travels up the length of the bullet.

I've been studying on that process for years, not with a Whitworth but with a number of different rifle and revolver calibers. Once your bullet gets short enough (not the problem with a Whitworth!) and the powder charges small enough, it becomes a problem to reliably, consistently produce the effect and to seal the bore. That's when hollow bases really come into their own.
Like with these are .36 caliber revolver bullets.
.36 125 grain.jpg
 

TFoley

62 Cal.
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
5,022
Reaction score
1,886
A pic is worth 1000 words!That must be a flat bottom bullet
It is, else I would not have posted it, you having asked specifically about such a bullet. :)

Holes made by the bullet above show distinct signs of have been hexagonalated.

1627654532726.png
 
Top