FFFF documented use in the Fur Trade Era? Un-glazed "Rifle Powder"? Is today's powder dirtier?

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The UK was served by Curtis& Harvey then changed hands some Gevelo powder then the Swiss But most I used was the bulk bought A5 FO triangle, that we bought in 50 pounds plastic bags inside the big cardboard box. I had a Powder permit to buy that much but we divid it up into pound tins soon as we got it . I used to watch the fine dust float up to the venetion striplights and wonder the wisdom of what we might be doing. The Powder was grey and unglazed I dubbed it' Soot' .But it was fine & De Witt Bailey in his Book on British Military Rifles used the same and thought it equal to the original powders and matched the sights . per original given charges . I didn't notice it being overly foul though he thought it was . And there where varios similar powders offered in NZ I did use Goex in the US plus Metior , Shure shot , ( a China powder ) some Elephant that was foul And now' Holy Smoke' a NZ made powder .But I useualy buy powder at auctions & currently use original C & H number 4 which hasn't been made since the sixties . but it keeps mix it up dry it in bowls in the bright sun and it should be the same rather than the varience some batches can have, And can lose you a match by topping up with a new tin different enough to shoot differently & the last thing you want in a match. I have never seen pyrodex or used any such offering .So have no opinion if don't want to go there from what ive gathered .
Rudyard
 
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I sat beside the owner of Back Creek Gun Shop at lunch today (probably 4th. largest powder distributor in the US) and asked him if a license was needed to buy FA or blasting powder and he said no.
 

RAEDWALD

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It may be worth noting that glazing and graphitise are not synonymous. Glazing is tumbling the corned grains to polish the surface. Coating with graphite merely means adding some to that tumbling process.

I remain to be convinced that the graphite does more than make the grains silver-shinier to help marketing, but I am open to scientific evidence that it does perform some other function.
 

Rock Home Isle

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Graphite is a dry lubricant. The use of graphite on the blackpowder helps to eliminate “bridging’ in the powder horn. Tumbling the powder knocks off the rough protrusions from the korning process, polishes the kernels, which serves to help eliminate “bridging” in the powder horn.
 

HighUintas

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I have read but am unsure of the validity of the statement that the graphite coating also slightly retards ignition, making it safer for mass handling, storage, etc.

Does anyone know the truth on that?
 

dgracia

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Hi dgracis, no need to interject for my sake, I'm quite aware of the reason for glazing on the powder and also that one can legally buy glazed or unglazed, blasting or fireworks powder. The first paragraph in the quote you replied was a quote of the previous post I was responding to. :thumb:

I've always used glazed powder (GOEX) and have never had any problems with the powder in the barrel when shooting or firing blanks but I have seen the fouling in the pan turn to soup causing trouble. Our group always bought powder in bulk (3f) from Back Creek Gun Shop and gave it to the members as they needed. The owner of Back Creek is one of the original members and after 47 years still participates when we are requested to do an event.
Hey Hawkeye,

My apologies for mistaking that as your quote. I appreciate the reply and I am on my way to make some more coffee so hopefully I don't make another similar mistake anytime soon.

Thanks!
 

Pukka Sahib

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Graphite is a dry lubricant. The use of graphite on the blackpowder helps to eliminate “bridging’ in the powder horn. Tumbling the powder knocks off the rough protrusions from the korning process, polishes the kernels, which serves to help eliminate “bridging” in the powder horn.
If you ever experienced “bridging”, you would never gripe about the use of graphite.
 

TFoley

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Not allowed to use a ramrod at reenactments because back during the bi-centennial (1976) a number of folks that year forgot to put the ramrod back in the pipes and launched it ...

That's what happened a few years back over in Ireland [Republic of].

It brought instant legislation banning the use of BP in any public displays except the the firing of the mid-day gun on Spike Island in Cork Harbour.

In any case, possession of BP in the Republic of Ireland, unless you operate a quarry, is an offence under the Prevention of Terrorism Act, and attracts a healthy vacation in the 'House of Grey onesies'.
 

hanshi

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I've used a good amount of non-graphited (?) powder for both targets and hunting. Jack's Battle Powder always worked just fine in my guns but did clump some. Compared with regular Goex bridging and clumping did happen on occasion but not with Goex. JPG was manufactured by Goex as a cheaper alternative but it still performed excellently for my friends and I. As for pan powder soup from humidity - experienced it on a few occasions - it made no difference if it was premium Goex or JBP. The reason of course is that once it's fired, a flintlock pan has fouling which DOES turn to soup and any fresh powder added to it. Careful wiping of the pan after each shot solved that problem. And in a clean gun I've never had problems with prime turning to mush even when I was hunting in heavy rain.
 

dgracia

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I've used a good amount of non-graphited (?) powder for both targets and hunting. Jack's Battle Powder always worked just fine in my guns but did clump some. Compared with regular Goex bridging and clumping did happen on occasion but not with Goex. JPG was manufactured by Goex as a cheaper alternative but it still performed excellently for my friends and I. As for pan powder soup from humidity - experienced it on a few occasions - it made no difference if it was premium Goex or JBP. The reason of course is that once it's fired, a flintlock pan has fouling which DOES turn to soup and any fresh powder added to it. Careful wiping of the pan after each shot solved that problem. And in a clean gun I've never had problems with prime turning to mush even when I was hunting in heavy rain.
I was deer hunting with a friend in Virginia in hot and humid weather. I was using 3F and he was using 3f but had 4F for his prime. He had soup problems and I did not. I have done a number of reenactments where it was raining and that caused all kinds of problems for us (VA7 regiments).
 
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"For blackpowder that doesn’t have a graphite coating, you need to have an explosives license. Graphite treated powder requires no license, so I would surmise that graphite coated powder would be measurably less energetic than none graphite treated blackpowder."

Rock Home Isle could you please explain that statement further. If you are referring to the seller they are required to have an explosives license to sell either. An individual (buyer) does not need a license to possess any legally purchased powder of either type.
My understanding, but I could be wrong. Graphite is added to eliminate the static electricity hazard.
 

PatrickL01

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Yes, graphite is an electrical conductor so graphited powder is much less likely to be ignited by static discharge. Of course it is also a dry lubricant. It has a lot of neat properties.
 
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