Does Your State have a Primitive Deer Season

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ugly old guy

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I don't know the dates off hand, and I'm not sure if you could classify them as "primitive" (note quotes) muzzleloading seasons.

Be that as it may, during the muzzleloader seasons in Idaho, modern in-lines are specifically prohibited. As are pelletized powder, sabots, 209 primes, and optical sights (unless you are visually impaired and have a permit. Then you can use a non-magnifying optical sight.)

Idaho has separate seasons for whitetail deer, black tail deer, Elk, Moose, Mountain Goat, Big Horn Sheep, Mountain Lion/Puma/Cougar, Antelope, Black Bear, and Two kinds of Turkey.
The archers, shotgunner's, and traditional sidelock muzzleloaders, only share the "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
Inline muzzleloaders can only be used in the "any weapon" and "rifle" seasons.

I don't know if it is a handicap, but the archers can only use a fixed blade broadhead. Expanding broadheads are forbidden at all times, regardless of if using a long bow, recurve bow, compound bow, or crossbow. (You do need a handicapped permit to use the crossbow, except in the "any weapons" seasons, if memory serves. You may need it then, as well.)
Minimum caliber for deer and the cat with a muzzleloader is .45. Everything else is .50.

The regulations say the projectile "Has to be with-in 0.01 inches of the bore diameter." You can use PRB or 100% lead non-gas checked conicals. Sabots, as mentioned above, are prohibited during all of the muzzleloader and "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
 

ppg1949

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I don't know the dates off hand, and I'm not sure if you could classify them as "primitive" (note quotes) muzzleloading seasons.

Be that as it may, during the muzzleloader seasons in Idaho, modern in-lines are specifically prohibited. As are pelletized powder, sabots, 209 primes, and optical sights (unless you are visually impaired and have a permit. Then you can use a non-magnifying optical sight.)

Idaho has separate seasons for whitetail deer, black tail deer, Elk, Moose, Mountain Goat, Big Horn Sheep, Mountain Lion/Puma/Cougar, Antelope, Black Bear, and Two kinds of Turkey.
The archers, shotgunner's, and traditional sidelock muzzleloaders, only share the "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
Inline muzzleloaders can only be used in the "any weapon" and "rifle" seasons.

I don't know if it is a handicap, but the archers can only use a fixed blade broadhead. Expanding broadheads are forbidden at all times, regardless of if using a long bow, recurve bow, compound bow, or crossbow. (You do need a handicapped permit to use the crossbow, except in the "any weapons" seasons, if memory serves. You may need it then, as well.)
Minimum caliber for deer and the cat with a muzzleloader is .45. Everything else is .50.

The regulations say the projectile "Has to be with-in 0.01 inches of the bore diameter." You can use PRB or 100% lead non-gas checked conicals. Sabots, as mentioned above, are prohibited during all of the muzzleloader and "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
UOG, Idaho was one of the states I highlighted in my petition. I used the Idaho regulations as my outline for a primitive season here. I doubt it goes anywhere but the seed has been planted. Thanks for your input.
 

renegadehunter

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I don't know the dates off hand, and I'm not sure if you could classify them as "primitive" (note quotes) muzzleloading seasons.

Be that as it may, during the muzzleloader seasons in Idaho, modern in-lines are specifically prohibited. As are pelletized powder, sabots, 209 primes, and optical sights (unless you are visually impaired and have a permit. Then you can use a non-magnifying optical sight.)

Idaho has separate seasons for whitetail deer, black tail deer, Elk, Moose, Mountain Goat, Big Horn Sheep, Mountain Lion/Puma/Cougar, Antelope, Black Bear, and Two kinds of Turkey.
The archers, shotgunner's, and traditional sidelock muzzleloaders, only share the "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
Inline muzzleloaders can only be used in the "any weapon" and "rifle" seasons.

I don't know if it is a handicap, but the archers can only use a fixed blade broadhead. Expanding broadheads are forbidden at all times, regardless of if using a long bow, recurve bow, compound bow, or crossbow. (You do need a handicapped permit to use the crossbow, except in the "any weapons" seasons, if memory serves. You may need it then, as well.)
Minimum caliber for deer and the cat with a muzzleloader is .45. Everything else is .50.

The regulations say the projectile "Has to be with-in 0.01 inches of the bore diameter." You can use PRB or 100% lead non-gas checked conicals. Sabots, as mentioned above, are prohibited during all of the muzzleloader and "Short Range Weapons" seasons.
In-lines actually CAN be used during muzzleloader only seasons in Idaho. It doesn't specifically say no in-lines, it just says that it must be "equipped with an ignition system that leaves any portion of the cap exposed when cocked and ready to fire". (Rule #7) That does throw some in-lines out of the mix, but there are many that fit that rule.
Here is a link to the "equipment during muzzleloader only season" rules. Note the second picture showing an example of "open ignition".
https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/weapons/muzzleloader
 

Ruben44

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Wish we did hear in Washington State. I've hunted with a side lock during the muzzleloader seasons out here for over 30 years. While there have been many changes to what a muzzleloader is under state F&G rules, it's more about the hunter behind it too. I've purchased a couple side lock percussion rifles to introduce the grandkids to the sport. Really looking forward to a custom Southern Mountain Rifle flintlock in .54. Anxious to shoot it and hunt with it.
 

ugly old guy

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In-lines actually CAN be used during muzzleloader only seasons in Idaho. It doesn't specifically say no in-lines, it just says that it must be "equipped with an ignition system that leaves any portion of the cap exposed when cocked and ready to fire". (Rule #7) That does throw some in-lines out of the mix, but there are many that fit that rule.
Here is a link to the "equipment during muzzleloader only season" rules. Note the second picture showing an example of "open ignition".
https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/weapons/muzzleloader
209 caps are still specifically prohibited. "Flintlock, Percussion Caps and Musket Caps Only". Do any inlines use number 10/11 percussion caps, or musket caps?
So far as I know, there is no such thing as an inline flintlock rile or smooth bore.
Pelletized powders, Sabots and gas-checked bullets, are also specifically prohibited, along with optical sights.
Admittedly, those with an inline can/could use loose powder and the required "with-in 0.01 inches of bore diameter" projectile, (round ball or conical) but it seems most would rather use a smaller, lighter, pistol bullet. I admit that makes less than zero sense to me.
 

Stony Broke

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Some folks just don't understand the meaning or care to participate in a "primitive season". When your only interest is shooting something by any manner possible, inlines enter the picture. Some guys just want to use every advantage they can get, instead of doing things in a primitive manner...and they don't understand the concept of taking game in a primitive manner and the satisfaction of it.
 

renegadehunter

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209 caps are still specifically prohibited. "Flintlock, Percussion Caps and Musket Caps Only". Do any inlines use number 10/11 percussion caps, or musket caps?
So far as I know, there is no such thing as an inline flintlock rile or smooth bore.
Pelletized powders, Sabots and gas-checked bullets, are also specifically prohibited, along with optical sights.
Admittedly, those with an inline can/could use loose powder and the required "with-in 0.01 inches of bore diameter" projectile, (round ball or conical) but it seems most would rather use a smaller, lighter, pistol bullet. I admit that makes less than zero sense to me.
Yes, there are inlines that have a nipple for #11 caps...my brother-in-law happens to own one that he inherited. It also meets the exposed cap rule, so it would be legal for Idaho. It shoots a .530 lead conical with 100 grains of Goex 2f quite well. I personally don't care for it, they just flat don't interest me in any way. I simply don't get excited or look forward to shooting one in comparison to a sidelock.
I see quite a few folks carrying the above type unmentionables around during the late muzzleloader only elk season in December. It is mostly archery hunters that were unsuccessful and they are making a last ditch effort to put an elk in the freezer since their "A" tag is good for the muzzleloader season as long as they buy a muzzleloader stamp.
They are not muzzleloader fans in most cases...so they just buy what they consider the most convenient to use for a last chance effort.
There are a few manufacturers that are making a "Northwest Edition" unmentionable that really pushes the envelope of the rule of "exposed cap".
 

ppg1949

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Big Thanks to all who replied. My petition for a primitive firearms deer season has been accepted and assigned to an investigative committee prior to a hearing. All that simply means is I met all the Natural Resources Committee's petition requirements.
Thanks again for the input, Phill.
 

Loyalist Dave

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Doubt the archery folks would agree to sharing season with muzzleloaders, traditional or modern. Remember them fighting hard to keep crossbows out of archery season in NY. Crossbows are now legal in NY, but basically treated like a muzzleloader.
Well you need to look at the state, and see what really is going on. In Maryland, while the archers get the first 6 weeks or so to themselves for deer, they share the woods with squirrel hunters, and dove hunters who stand on the edge of the woodline. So claims that deer hunters with single shot rifles or shotguns would somehow ruin their hunting will need to show how a guy with a 20 gauge or 12 gauge pump going for squirrels or dove and thus shooting a lot more often as well as moving through the woods for squirrel is not doing the same thing. And since for the past couple of decades the seasons for deer-archery and squirrel/dove all open on the same day, without a hue-and-cry from the archers, then it's not a problem.

Especially if one was to put a "primitive" season at the very end of deer season after the woods have been heavily traveled by everybody...

LD
 

SDSmlf

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Well you need to look at the state, and see what really is going on. In Maryland, while the archers get the first 6 weeks or so to themselves for deer, they share the woods with squirrel hunters, and dove hunters who stand on the edge of the woodline. So claims that deer hunters with single shot rifles or shotguns would somehow ruin their hunting will need to show how a guy with a 20 gauge or 12 gauge pump going for squirrels or dove and thus shooting a lot more often as well as moving through the woods for squirrel is not doing the same thing. And since for the past couple of decades the seasons for deer-archery and squirrel/dove all open on the same day, without a hue-and-cry from the archers, then it's not a problem.

Especially if one was to put a "primitive" season at the very end of deer season after the woods have been heavily traveled by everybody...

LD
The archery only hunters I know would flip the argument and ask why the ‘primitive’ muzzleloaders can’t just hunt with the ‘modern’ muzzleloaders?

As far as tacking a special ‘primitive’ season on at the end of the regular season, that is likely very doable if approached correctly and the deer population supports it. In North Carolina they started an ‘urban archery’ season that runs through January, after the regular season ends. Basically allows archery hunters the opportunity to fill unused tags inside of city limits on private property as long as they have the owners permission.

While not ‘prime’ hunting time, an effort to get a post regular season ‘primitive’ season could be great way to get the idea accepted and the ball rolling.

And before someone asks or comments, I am not suggesting an urban primitive muzzleloader season inside city limits. I was just using the additional season for the urban archer as an example of what can be accomplished with the right approach.
 

nrayle21

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West Virginia, our regular muzzle loader season is now open to any type muzzleloader, scopes and all! Years ago it was sidelocks only, which is the way it should be!! We now have a PRIMITIVE SEASON in January that is sidelocks and stickbows only. Our archery season also now includes crossbows for everyone, not just the disabled! I’m guess they’re trying to get more people in the woods any way they can and in this day and age I suppose that’s the right thing to do, hunter numbers are way down. Video games are ruining the youngsters these days!
 

Loyalist Dave

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The archery only hunters I know would flip the argument and ask why the ‘primitive’ muzzleloaders can’t just hunt with the ‘modern’ muzzleloaders?
And I will flip it back and say...,
Why can't the archery hunters be limited to non-compound bows, and only using wooden arrows? ;)
AND..., Why can't the archers get their exclusive deer hunting done from September 1st until October 21st, yet they seem to need from January 1st to the 31st as well ? ;) All of the non-archers get a total of five weeks, while archers get 10 weeks, PLUS they are allowed to hunt during any of the gun seasons...that's 15 weeks total...and lets not get into the areas that are "archery only" for deer... :confused:

LD
 
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