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Barrel Marking Questions

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johnraleksa

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The British contributors have nailed this gun down for you. Although both the 3-banded and 2-banded versions were heavily imported into both the North and South in our Civil War, they were "commercially made". You would then see British commercial proof marks on the barrel. Just GOOGLE search Pattern 1853 Enfield Rifle for lots more info. I have the commercial (Greener) two banded version with the bayonet lug on the barrel (P58 model?) and used to fire it frequently with commercial ".58 Minie balls" and 70 grains od black powder.
thanks for the information and reply I'll try to look it up. love all the information. to have something this old and could still use it only shows what craftsmanship use to be. I had a 120to130 year-old barn restored last year and the only thing that was bad was the foundation and that somewhat was caused by groundhogs and raccoons digging holes around the foundation. it is good to have something that has a history to it.
 

TFoley

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This is the lock of one of my Sniders - dated 1962 -

1611009360707.png


...and this is a lock of a Parker-Hale Whitworth match rifle from 1986...

1611009567106.png


..this is the oldest Whitworth...from around 1978 or so...

1611009820281.png
 

apachesx2

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GREENSWLDE

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As seen on the Lock Plate, Tom is referring to a Parker-Hale Twentieth Century Whitworth Made from the original Enfield 1860's Jigs and Gauges Loaned by the Royal Armories at Enfield, U.K. as were All the Birmingham Proofed Parker-Hale marked Rifles Prior to No.9000. As such could be classed as original ENFIELDS. I lived in Birmingham at the time, shooting with friends from P/H. OLD DOG..
 

TFoley

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Please note that the early versions of the Snider were literally converted into breech-loaders by chopping off a lump of barrel and adding the Snider breech mechanism - called the shoe - and breechblock. That is the appeal of the Snider - nothing else changed - even the hammer was the same.

My two Sniders, both bearing 1862 Enfield locks, ended up in Canada, with the Short rifle taken into service just before Confederation on July 1st 1867, hence its lack of a DC stamp [Dominion of Canada]. By way of making up for that omission, the three-band rifle has a diamond DC stamp on each side of the butt.
 

johnraleksa

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Please note that the early versions of the Snider were literally converted into breech-loaders by chopping off a lump of barrel and adding the Snider breech mechanism - called the shoe - and breechblock. That is the appeal of the Snider - nothing else changed - even the hammer was the same.

My two Sniders, both bearing 1862 Enfield locks, ended up in Canada, with the Short rifle taken into service just before Confederation on July 1st 1867, hence its lack of a DC stamp [Dominion of Canada]. By way of making up for that omission, the three-band rifle has a diamond DC stamp on each side of the butt.
thanks for more information
 
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