An American Percussion 12 Gauge Double Barrel Shotgun That Has Been In My Family for Generations

Muzzleloading Forum

Help Support Muzzleloading Forum:

Rambob

32 Cal
Joined
Apr 21, 2022
Messages
20
Reaction score
71
This Percussion Cap 12 Gauge Double Barrel Shotgun finishes up my trifecta of family firearms that I have inherited from members of my family, long dead and gone. I do not remember hearing any real history on the shotgun, but I believe it has been in my family from at least the 1800’s. Interestingly, the shotgun has it’s original wooden ramrod and has the word TENNESSEE prominently stamped into the stock. I had it propped in the corner of our antique room for over a decade, just relegating it as an artifact for display. But about 3 months ago, I got the idea to look at it as a possible rehabilitation project back to shooting condition. From the attached photos you can see this shotgun has had a hard life with it’s stock being broken at the wrist and crudely repaired. The two percussion nipples were a broken mess, but those were relatively easy to remove and replace with new, modern, stainless steel nipples. The locks were both 100% functional and after the replacement nipples were installed, I was able to reliably snap percussion caps at will.

I haven’t actually fired this shotgun with shot yet, but I did fire each barrel as a blank by putting 40 grains of Pyrodex FFFg powder in a barrel behind a 12 gauge felt wad. Both barrels fired perfectly with satisfying loud booms! After examining the broken stock repair closely, it appears to be solid, but I am not yet ready to possibly damage the stock again and ruin the stylish repair that was done on it.

The last thing of interest may be the over the shoulder shot bag that I am showing in a few of the photos. I originally received the pieces of the bag in a small, paper bag with the shotgun. The metal pieces were all there, but all of the leather was rotten and unworkable except as patterns. I am a pretty accomplished leather worker and was able to replace all of the leather, integrate the metal pieces in and assemble a really neatly designed shotgun accessory. The bag hangs over the shoulder with the two spouts pointing down. Each spout has a small, spring loaded door inside so when you remove the brass scoop, no other shot will drop on the ground. Inserting the scoop again opens the door, dispenses shot into scoop and when scoop is removed, door springs shut. There are two separate shot sections, in the bag, for different sized shot I presume.

As always, any comments, advice, suggestions, etc. are welcome.



Regards,



Bob
 

Attachments

  • Right Side.JPG
    Right Side.JPG
    87.2 KB · Views: 76
  • Left Side Butt.JPG
    Left Side Butt.JPG
    50.6 KB · Views: 79
  • top View.JPG
    top View.JPG
    31.4 KB · Views: 71
  • Bottom View.JPG
    Bottom View.JPG
    35.3 KB · Views: 82
  • Right Butt.JPG
    Right Butt.JPG
    74.7 KB · Views: 80
  • Left Butt.JPG
    Left Butt.JPG
    82.2 KB · Views: 80
  • Tennessee Stamp.JPG
    Tennessee Stamp.JPG
    264.4 KB · Views: 74
  • Top Repair.JPG
    Top Repair.JPG
    72.7 KB · Views: 69
  • Bottom Repair.JPG
    Bottom Repair.JPG
    103.4 KB · Views: 68
  • Shot Bag.JPG
    Shot Bag.JPG
    105.5 KB · Views: 66
Joined
Jan 1, 2022
Messages
1,401
Reaction score
916
Location
oklahoma
This Percussion Cap 12 Gauge Double Barrel Shotgun finishes up my trifecta of family firearms that I have inherited from members of my family, long dead and gone. I do not remember hearing any real history on the shotgun, but I believe it has been in my family from at least the 1800’s. Interestingly, the shotgun has it’s original wooden ramrod and has the word TENNESSEE prominently stamped into the stock. I had it propped in the corner of our antique room for over a decade, just relegating it as an artifact for display. But about 3 months ago, I got the idea to look at it as a possible rehabilitation project back to shooting condition. From the attached photos you can see this shotgun has had a hard life with it’s stock being broken at the wrist and crudely repaired. The two percussion nipples were a broken mess, but those were relatively easy to remove and replace with new, modern, stainless steel nipples. The locks were both 100% functional and after the replacement nipples were installed, I was able to reliably snap percussion caps at will.

I haven’t actually fired this shotgun with shot yet, but I did fire each barrel as a blank by putting 40 grains of Pyrodex FFFg powder in a barrel behind a 12 gauge felt wad. Both barrels fired perfectly with satisfying loud booms! After examining the broken stock repair closely, it appears to be solid, but I am not yet ready to possibly damage the stock again and ruin the stylish repair that was done on it.

The last thing of interest may be the over the shoulder shot bag that I am showing in a few of the photos. I originally received the pieces of the bag in a small, paper bag with the shotgun. The metal pieces were all there, but all of the leather was rotten and unworkable except as patterns. I am a pretty accomplished leather worker and was able to replace all of the leather, integrate the metal pieces in and assemble a really neatly designed shotgun accessory. The bag hangs over the shoulder with the two spouts pointing down. Each spout has a small, spring loaded door inside so when you remove the brass scoop, no other shot will drop on the ground. Inserting the scoop again opens the door, dispenses shot into scoop and when scoop is removed, door springs shut. There are two separate shot sections, in the bag, for different sized shot I presume.

As always, any comments, advice, suggestions, etc. are welcome.



Regards,



Bob
very nice
 
Top