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Your most 'interesting' muzzleloader transaction ?

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With Gun Broker and most of the other gun sales sites, you have to trust the seller. I saw a beautiful shotgun stock on a shotgun in Gun Broker. I immediately bought the shotgun. Then I started reading the huge paragraph associated with the sale. I read in the middle of the paragraph that the shotgun pictured might not be the one I would receive. Not a true bait and switch, but enough that I refused to buy the shotgun and was removed from Gun Broker for six months. The dealer didn't last long either.
That is a big fear I mentioned earlier in this interesting thread. Its just too easy substituting a different picture misleading the buyer.
 

Heyyou48307

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We were enjoying a couple beers at rendevous when an olc couple walked by. About 10 minutes later they were walking out. I said" you couldnt possibly have seen everything" he says well those people arent too friendly, WELL says I sit down and have a beer with us. We became good friends and wound up shooting together off and on for the next 15 years or so, About another ten later he contacted me and told me because of that day I offered him a beer and friendship into this wonderful hobby, he couldnt see very well or shoot anymore,he gave me his Caywood Wilson tradegun.
 

nhmoose

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Yeah, 20 years ago, there was a rather infamous gunsmith and supplier of BPCR items who had been making a good name for himself. He was taking the orders in, receiving deposits on items to be produced. He had developed some highly desired parts for obsolete arms. Don't know the cause for discord, but his wife's attorney lowered the boom, froze his accounts, had his shop locked down as a marital asset, pending a property division that went on for over a year. Guy lost everything and what had been a good name. Literally hundreds of people bad mouthing him over refunds and unfilled orders. I understand he felt there was no way he could start over and rebuild the old business with his reputation ruined and even if he wanted to, there was no way to repay those who lost money.
Blame his ex wife not him he got the same as you.
 

zimmerstutzen

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Blame his ex wife not him he got the same as you.
Oh I do, but also, HIS lack of proper book keeping/accounting to be able to keep the customer's money separate. Ability to account for what's not rightly mine yet, isn't that hard. Gunsmith's keep customer's names on guns and log them in and out. If a creditor ever seized a gun shop, the curtomer's guns should be easy to identify.
 

Hermit Tim

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With Gun Broker and most of the other gun sales sites, you have to trust the seller. I saw a beautiful shotgun stock on a shotgun in Gun Broker. I immediately bought the shotgun. Then I started reading the huge paragraph associated with the sale. I read in the middle of the paragraph that the shotgun pictured might not be the one I would receive. Not a true bait and switch, but enough that I refused to buy the shotgun and was removed from Gun Broker for six months. The dealer didn't last long either.
I do a bunch of buying and selling on Gunbroker. So far only been stuck once by a seller but it wasn’t that bad. The seller neglected to tell me the hammer wouldn’t stay in the cocked position and the trigger was stuck on a 28 gauge flintlock I purchased as a project gun. I didn’t get too upset about it because I only paid a little over a hundred bucks for it and it is in otherwise great shape. And I bought it for a project gun so it will be taken apart and everything reworked anyway. And it is a 28 gauge flint. I knew I wouldn’t be finding another one that cheap so sure wasn’t sending it back. Always be sure to read and reread the complete description as well as any terms or conditions the seller has on the listing. Ask any questions before bidding. Be specific, like “is this the same gun I will be getting?” or “does the hammer and lock work as they should?”. Also request additional pictures before bidding if needed. Tell the seller specifically what part of the gun you want to see pictures of and most reputable sellers will not mind doing that for you.

I make and sell outdoorsy stuff on ebay and etsy for a living and also sell guns on Gunbroker. With all three sites, I’ve had way more trouble from buyers who don’t read listings or payment terms then I have with sellers being misleading jerks. It has been my experience some buyers see the picture and the price and jump straight to buy it now without reading the listing or doing their due diligence. I’ve even had a few tell me that. Had to cancel several orders because they didn’t read the ad before buying.

Here is an example. One thing I do is make custom ferro rods with antler or wood handles. In the listings for each style there are multiple pictures. There will be a picture that shows several rods side by side to demonstrate the differences from one to the other due to being handmade. The listing clearly says in several places “This listing is for one ferro rod only”. Someone will buy and, when they get their package, I will get a nasty email wanting to know where the rest of their ferro rods are thinking they were getting three or four for ten bucks. So far I have won the argument each time as none of them have left negative feedback. I tell them to go back and read the listing. Then they always mail me back and say they hadn’t read the listing and were wrong. So far so good, but this is just one example. Nothing is hidden or misleading in any of my listings but, if the buyer doesn’t read it, then it doesn’t really matter what the listing says.

It is the seller’s responsibility to be a straight-up guy and give decent and honest customer service, which is what I have built my little business on, but it is on the buyer to make sure they understand what is being offered. We all know there are plenty of folks out there that will stick you, especially online, so be sure to protect yourself any way you can before buying. And Gunbroker has buyer protection. If you do get bent over Gunbroker can get involved if needed. Just my two cents, but I hate to see good people get screwed by crappy online sellers.
 

Eric Krewson

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My best and heart warming transaction; My archer buddy was diagnosed with terminal cancer, he was once into buckskinning and B/P shooting, I shot a TC flintlock.

He called me to his house when things looked bleak, he walked over to his custom flintlock on the wall, took it off the wall and put it in my lap. He said "this is yours now, you are the only one I know who will use and enjoy it".

He then proceeded to give me everything he had B/P related, a Goustomsky trade gun, two pistols, two tackle boxes full of everything, multiple molds and 4 sets of intricate bags with scrimshawed horns and stag handle knives and much more.

Words can't describe how this gesture touched my heart, I sold my TC stuff and started building rifles because of the direction he pointed me, I had never shot a properly built longrifle before, his had a Bill Large barrel and a Roller lock, nuff said.
 

Hermit Tim

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My best and heart warming transaction; My archer buddy was diagnosed with terminal cancer, he was once into buckskinning and B/P shooting, I shot a TC flintlock.

He called me to his house when things looked bleak, he walked over to his custom flintlock on the wall, took it off the wall and put it in my lap. He said "this is yours now, you are the only one I know who will use and enjoy it".

He then proceeded to give me everything he had B/P related, a Goustomsky trade gun, two pistols, two tackle boxes full of everything, multiple molds and 4 sets of intricate bags with scrimshawed horns and stag handle knives and much more.

Words can't describe how this gesture touched my heart, I sold my TC stuff and started building rifles because of the direction he pointed me, I had never shot a properly built longrifle before, his had a Bill Large barrel and a Roller lock, nuff said.
It is terrible what happened to your buddy but also very awesome of him for what he did for you in the end. Sounds like a real friend and a good guy. Thanks for sharing. Florence is a great area, by the way...
 

Crow-Feather

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It is the seller’s responsibility to be a straight-up guy and give decent and honest customer service, which is what I have built my little business on, but it is on the buyer to make sure they understand what is being offered. We all know there are plenty of folks out there that will stick you, especially online, so be sure to protect yourself any way you can before buying. And Gunbroker has buyer protection. If you do get bent over Gunbroker can get involved if needed. Just my two cents, but I hate to see good people get screwed by crappy online sellers.
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I agree with you that the wind blows both ways. If the seller had placed in the picture or in bold type under the picture, that the stock wasn't the one I was going to get, I would have no reason to complain. But I saw that stock, and knew that unless I hit that buy it now button, it would be gone. I fell into the trap the seller had set. It was an absolutely beautiful stock with various color hues in it. It has been 15 years or so but I can still see that stock. Part of my anger was that I had fallen into the trap, but most of it was the loss of that beautiful stock. It was like holding out a huge piece of candy and then jerking it away. I have seen many sales since and the warning, "NOT THE ACTUAL ITEM BEING SOLD" tells me the vendor is a person of integrity.
 

elkbelch

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Yesterday I received a flintlock I purchased on gunbroker last week. I had been holding out for a .54 caliber flintlock. The rifle was a 50 caliber that had been commissioned for someone but never fired, I decided I would go ahead and bid on the rifle as I really thought it was beautiful. When it arrived low and behold it was a 54 caliber and much more beautiful in person.
Shawn
 

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