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Wooden knife sheaths?

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Recently acquired a "riflemen" style knife with a wood sheath. We're these ever actually in use? Period correct?
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Wood sheaths were common in Spanish America so found their way in to Anglo America via Santa Fe Trail, Texas and the Louisiana purchase lands, as from 1763 - 1801 that was Spanish territory.
Scots made use of wooden sheaths and along our Eastern seaboard sailors and fisherman made use of them.
The Indians of the pacific north west made lots of wooden sheaths.
Typical interior Anglo and French/Dutch America used leather sheaths, but a wooden sheath would be found as at-least available . I think Fire arms Traps and tools of the Mountain men by Russell show some.
 
This could be interesting. I was thinking about the same "feat of engineering".

Wood sheaths were common in Spanish America so found their way in to Anglo America via Santa Fe Trail, Texas and the Louisiana purchase lands, as from 1763 - 1801 that was Spanish territory.
Scots made use of wooden sheaths and along our Eastern seaboard sailors and fisherman made use of them.
The Indians of the pacific north west made lots of wooden sheaths.
Typical interior Anglo and French/Dutch America used leather sheaths, but a wooden sheath would be found as at-least available . I think Fire arms Traps and tools of the Mountain men by Russell show some.

Wood sheaths were common in Spanish America so found their way in to Anglo America via Santa Fe Trail, Texas and the Louisiana purchase lands, as from 1763 - 1801 that was Spanish territory.
Scots made use of wooden sheaths and along our Eastern seaboard sailors and fisherman made use of them.
The Indians of the pacific north west made lots of wooden sheaths.
Typical interior Anglo and French/Dutch America used leather sheaths, but a wooden sheath would be found as at-least available . I think Fire arms Traps and tools of the Mountain men by Russell show some.
Thanx Tenngun. Forgot I have that book so just dug it out. Discussion of wood sheaths starting on page 205
 
This looks like an interesting concept. I have a leather sheath and knife on the strap of my possible's bag, but it doesn't "work" quite right in that location the way I have it fastened. I think if it were stiffer, it would be more functional. I am thinking about forging a knife this summer, and perhaps then I will make a sheath out of something exotic... maybe purple heart or ebony. I have a piece of teak decking from the USS New Jersey. Too small for a sheath, but it would work for knife handles...

The knife looks like a modified bayonet. Is it?
 
This looks like an interesting concept. I have a leather sheath and knife on the strap of my possible's bag, but it doesn't "work" quite right in that location the way I have it fastened. I think if it were stiffer, it would be more functional. I am thinking about forging a knife this summer, and perhaps then I will make a sheath out of something exotic... maybe purple heart or ebony. I have a piece of teak decking from the USS New Jersey. Too small for a sheath, but it would work for knife handles...

The knife looks like a modified bayonet. Is it?
Don't think so but possible I guess. This was in collection/gear I picked up that had belonged to guy active in rendezvous in 80's and 90's.
 
I have an old CVA knife kit tucked away from the early 1980’s. I think it was called the “Trapper”. I never assembled the knife. It was one of those ‘gifts’ you dare not throw away or sell, if you get my drift. I do believe the kit contained roughed out wooden pieces for a sheath.

I suppose if it was completed, it would greatly compliment a double knit, polyester leisure suit/ buck skinning outfit for any Friday or Saturday night at the disco… 😂
 
Wick Ellerbe might know. There were a few sheaths that looks like those used on swords, with a metal collar and frog on the top and a metal tip on the bottom. I think the leather was kid glove thin and attached over a wood liner- so wood sheath. Like some swords.
 
Wick Ellerbe might know. There were a few sheaths that looks like those used on swords, with a metal collar and frog on the top and a metal tip on the bottom. I think the leather was kid glove thin and attached over a wood liner- so wood sheath. Like some swords.
Some were done that way, but most were just leather of a necessary thickness and possibly hardened. Most sword scabbards were just leather with metal throats and bottom chapes. The knife sheath below is just metal tipped leather. My sheath and I believe a Kyle Willyard knife. Well tanned, vege tanned leather of an appropriate thickness will naturally harden/stiffen during the wet fitting and sizing process. A leather over wood sheath could be more durable, but it depends on how durable you feel it needs to be. An all metal scabbard would be the most durable, but also the more involved construction. Anyone who can make a metal throat and chape could make an all metal scabbard. The chape is almost just a small version of an all metal scabbard, it just does have a throat cap. Many of the NDN knife sheaths were of strong bark covered with brain tan.
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Seems a wooden sheath would be far more protection for the carrier than just a piece of leather.I'd want a piece of wood ( in addition to the leather) between me and the metal blade if I slipped and fell.
 
Wooden sheaths are to protect the steel. The Japanese have been using them for 1000s of years.

My Searles Bowie has a wooden sheath. So do our Katanas.
You also leave the blades facing upwards so they oil does not effect the blade edge.
When you see a Samurai blade it is curved downward to keep the edge up.
 
LRB- I tried making a throat and tip and it didn't come out very good however I really like the look. Years ago I bought a cheap India made sword and that was where I got this idea of wood with kid glove thin leather over it.
For those who might want to know. I used leather because that's what I had but I wanted to make rawhide sheaths. Well once I did I was sort of disappointed because the leather has some resilience or "give" whereas with a rock hard rawhide the knife can rattle around if the fit isn't just right.
 
Wooden sheaths are to protect the steel. The Japanese have been using them for 1000s of years.

My Searles Bowie has a wooden sheath. So do our Katanas.
You also leave the blades facing upwards so they oil does not effect the blade edge.
When you see a Samurai blade it is curved downward to keep the edge up.
Please don't think this to be derogatory, but how does oil affect an edge in any bad way?
 
LRB- I tried making a throat and tip and it didn't come out very good however I really like the look. Years ago I bought a cheap India made sword and that was where I got this idea of wood with kid glove thin leather over it.
For those who might want to know. I used leather because that's what I had but I wanted to make rawhide sheaths. Well once I did I was sort of disappointed because the leather has some resilience or "give" whereas with a rock hard rawhide the knife can rattle around if the fit isn't just right.
Yes. Most all "rawhide sheaths" are just covers for vege tanned leather. You might be surprised how simple metal throats and tips can be, when you have guidance. Time consuming, and care taking, but not as bad as you may think. There used to be a picture tutorial available on the net showing step by step of how to make an all metal scabbard. I learned from it. Gone now, but I can show you how to make a tip/chape. I have a few photos that would help you. Throats can be simple and easy, or involved. The one on the knife and sheath I posted is involved and takes much time, and much care. Being Sterling silver, one does not want to make many mistakes, but others can be pretty easy.
 
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