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Are you deleting the brass nose cap?
Yes sir.

Per Traditions Kentuckyish instruction sheet.

Step 1: Remove brass nose cap from package.

Step 2: Throw brass nose cap in the garbage.

I now have TWO sources that show original American Long Rifles with barrels that stick out without nose caps. That's good enough for me. Cuzz Traditions Kentuckyish brass nose caps be fugly.
 

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Yes sir.

Per Traditions Kentuckyish instruction sheet.

Step 1: Remove brass nose cap from package.

Step 2: Throw brass nose cap in the garbage.

I now have TWO sources that show original American Long Rifles with barrels that stick out without nose caps. That's good enough for me. Cuzz Traditions Kentuckyish brass nose caps be fugly.
I agree. I’m looking forward to seeing it done.
 
Yes sir.

Per Traditions Kentuckyish instruction sheet.

Step 1: Remove brass nose cap from package.

Step 2: Throw brass nose cap in the garbage.

I now have TWO sources that show original American Long Rifles with barrels that stick out without nose caps. That's good enough for me. Cuzz Traditions Kentuckyish brass nose caps be fugly.
64Springer, love your instructions :D.

Regarding items that weren't up to scratch or needed, back in my army days we'd advise, "Paint it green mate, and throw it in the long grass!"

Pete
 
Went clay shooting, with my newly repaired 20b percussion gun, 1/2 oz lead, hit them off the 120ft tall tower, much to the annoyance of the modern guns practicing for pheasants, who were missing more than they hit,
 
Took a 3/8" x 1/2" steel bushing and made a ramrod tip. Recessed so the tip centers on the ball.

Found a great Valspar color. Cowboy Suede. Very close to lye water stained cherry.
 

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Have made similar tips for short starters and left the wood flush. The wood soon takes on a concave shape.

Don't like that red but might have a whole different look on the stock.
 
Have made similar tips for short starters and left the wood flush. The wood soon takes on a concave shape.

Don't like that red but might have a whole different look on the stock.
I redid a mate's rod. After pinning, we left the end flush, soaked the tip in vinegar to 'age' the stainless, then while still damp firmly struck the tip with a large, rounded peen hammer to set, bruise, the wood back. The resulting concave was nicely rounded to accept the ball. His idea to do that, not mine - worked a treat.

Pete
 
It was actually yesterday (Sunday morning), met up with a fellow from work at the local range to shoot. He's big into modern muzzleloaders for that extra deer season here in Illinois, however he had never shot a flintlock. I brought along the old flintlock Renegade that was put together from parts in true Johnny Cash style (one piece at a time). The shooting session went well, I loaded the 1st round to show him how and let him load after that. We had one misfire or flash in the pan without ignition of the main charge, showed him how to pick the vent, prime it again and it fired right away. We shot a a couple unmentionables, but the majority of the time was spent with the flintlock.

I believe he is hooked, he was asking how much a flintlock cost and what all it took to get started. We are planning to attend a shoot at a local muzzleloader club, that would be a first for both of us.
 
I finally cut a 100 yard "range" through the woods. Well, technically it's 96 yards, but I'm going to move the backstop, later.

The only thing that isn't the most optimum about is it being at a bit of a downward angle, the target is probably about 3 or 4 ft below where I shoot from. Makes the "backstop" much safer though, every round is angled towards the ground, even a horrible miss would most likely end up a few feet back in the woods, and not flying over some field who knows where.
 
Came across a couple of scrap satellite dishes. Opened up the end of the larger one to fit the smaller one and riveted them together. I wanted something light enough to carry out into the woods and try some 300 - 400 yard shots. Set it up on a T-Post at my 100 yard marker in my yard for a few practice shots. The second image is zoomed in from 100 yards just to get a better picture of what it looks like. The top edge is shoulder high, the bottom edge is just below my knees.
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The low right flyer was all me - had a slightly delayed ignition and relaxed as soon as the cap popped. Should have held it longer.
Pedersoli 1861 Springfield shot off-hand, 500gr. burton ball over 65 grains of GOEX 2F. All in all I am not disappointed, although I plan to hang a cow bell on the bottom edge to get a bit more feedback on a hit.
 
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