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Shooting sticks design

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You might want to check with your club to see if they have any requirements. The NMLRA has specs for authorized sticks that are pointed at the bottom but do not allow nails or other methods of anchoring the sticks so you have to set them up for each shot. If your club does not care or has no requirements, hardwood with a strip of leather glued to the inside surface of the stick to protect the rifle above the joint and nails in the bottom of the sticks work well. The nails allow you to adjust and set the sticks for the match so you don't have to set them up and adjust shot by shot. You will appreciate the one time set up more as you 'mature'.
 
Here's a look a one set of sticks I use. This set does have a spiked base. Our club does allow that for cross stick matches. They are decent and stable. And free, made from scrap oak pallet wood.
 

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I had a set I made out of large river cane that I used for years, I am the worlds worse for leaving my ground hunting set up, putting on all of my gear, walking out after dark and forgetting my shooting sticks. I don't have a clue where I left these sticks, I hunt a lot of different places within a half mile area of my house, perhaps they will turn up.

I made this set a couple of days ago out of an oak board I found in the attic of my shop; they are heavy but sturdy.

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The sticks are 48" long with a bolt and wingnut at the cross, I glued leather on the insides above the cross to protect my rifle. I ripped the board on my bandsaw, the sticks are 1 1/8" square. I hunt very hilly terrain out of a strap on Millenium tree seat and need longer sticks when I am facing downhill. I drilled the ends and glued in a couple of pieces of ramrod in as spikes, they will stand in place with the spikes in the ground.

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You might want to check with your club to see if they have any requirements. The NMLRA has specs for authorized sticks that are pointed at the bottom but do not allow nails or other methods of anchoring the sticks so you have to set them up for each shot. If your club does not care or has no requirements, hardwood with a strip of leather glued to the inside surface of the stick to protect the rifle above the joint and nails in the bottom of the sticks work well. The nails allow you to adjust and set the sticks for the match so you don't have to set them up and adjust shot by shot. You will appreciate the one time set up more as you 'mature'.
Perfect reply. :thumb: Do decide where and how you will use your sticks before making them. Years ago, at Friendship and elsewhere, I used to carry jugs of water to soak the ground then dig a hole for my sticks and set them in the dirt which dried and hardened to hold them. These days that would be a big no-no. BTW, if you are young and healthy, the X-stick or Buffalo matches are great fun and highly competitive but too much work for us old pot bellies.
 
The absolute best I have seen were designed by the late Wind Whitehall. He called them Okanogan Shooting Sticks as his private range was in the Okanogan country of northeastern Washington.
Here he is running a Sharps at very long range. In spite of the BPCR, I hope the mods will permit the link, as it shows his sticks in use.

And here are dimensions:
https://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?366341-Okanagan-Shooting-Sticks
 
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