My new Whitworth and Volunteer molds

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In anticipation of working up some loads for my PH Whitworth and Volunteer I finally decided on some molds to try. Both molds are supposed to cast a .442 in pure lead for paper patching with vintage .002 onion skin paper. The cylindrical mold should cast a 500 grain, 530 grain, and 550 grain bullet but I won't know that until I have a chance to cast some and test them. The same goes for the hexagonal mold but I'm not sure of the grain weight until I cast a few of them as well. The upside is that I can use both the cylindrical and hexagonal in the Whitworth and I will have an assortment of weights to test in the Volunteer with the cylindrical mold. I also had Tom at Accurate make 2 different nose styles on the cylindrical mold to see what if any difference there is. My guess is that it won't change anything but I like to tinker so it should
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be interesting to see what happens.
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Cpt Flint

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The use of trick molds for the Whitworth is totally unnecessary. The Parker Hale that I have came with no accessories at all. I simply used a Brooks Custom mold for my BPCR .45-70 and sized it .450 on the two bottom bands. 60 grains of 1FG and a round card wad has given me the legendary accuracy that a Whitworth is famous for. You wasted your money on trick molds. Paper patching is an ancient and discredited method of making an easy job harder. If you wish to proceed on this folly you have a good start.
 

ResearchPress

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The use of trick molds for the Whitworth is totally unnecessary. The Parker Hale that I have came with no accessories at all. I simply used a Brooks Custom mold for my BPCR .45-70 and sized it .450 on the two bottom bands. 60 grains of 1FG and a round card wad has given me the legendary accuracy that a Whitworth is famous for. You wasted your money on trick molds. Paper patching is an ancient and discredited method of making an easy job harder. If you wish to proceed on this folly you have a good start.
🤣 Funny!

Apparently it's OK for you to use your trick "Brooks Custom mold for my BPCR .45-70" in a muzzle loading rifle, but not so for someone seeking to use a bullet of the form originally used in the Whitworth rifle... Surely the use of a hexagonal bullet for the Whitworth rifle is part of its allure and in keeping with traditional muzzle loading, which this forum promotes.

Similarly paper patched bullets are traditional and still widely used today in both long range muzzle loading and black powder cartridge rifle. They're easy and quick to prepare and no messing around with lube. Why are they discredited? Worked fine for me just over two weeks ago when I won a 900 yard muzzle loading rifle match.

The Whitworth in the 19thC used both hexagonal and cylindrical paper patched bullets to good effect. Seeking to replicate that is part of the joys of traditional muzzle loading.

David
 
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Thanks for the reply to my post David. I have always appreciated your input.
I haven't had either of the rifles on the range for over 20 years but the Whitworths favorite load was a swaged hexagonal bullet that was available at that time and 72.5 grains of 2 F Swiss with a wad and a grease cookie. Maybe David can help remember the name of the bullet that was available at the time the old LRML Yahoo forum was alive? If I remember it started with a P and I want to say that the man's name was (Polsinar) sp or something to that effect. I have also cast a cylindrical bullet with a Lyman mold and it seemed to work well with the Volunteer and shot OK in the Whitworth too. I'm not put off by paper patching and certainly don't mind trying different molds as it's all part of the experience. I like the art of ballistics as much as the shooting and making smoke....it's all fun to me. Being a glutton for punishment I also cast and roll paper for 6 paper cutter Sharps. If I'm in a hurry I use Charlie Hahn's cardboard tubes.
 

Rudyard

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WW mould with the helix where made by George Arnold of Jersey C I (UK) but I expect he,s not doing them now David might know & I bought one years ago .exellent quality they where . Rudyard .
 
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You’re likely referring to the Polisar brothers; as I understand things, their swaged bullets are no longer available (and haven’t been for some time).

David

That was the name I was looking for David. When I bought my Whitworth the seller included quite a few of the Polisar brothers swaged bullets. Shortly after I worked up a load for them I found out that they were no longer making them. That has been many, many years ago now.
 

dave951

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That mold would look perfect in here-

Reproduction Whitworth case I made from pix for a member on this forum. He's been collecting all the other goodies that populate the storage areas. One item of note is a set of 3 gunsmith screwdrivers with blued hollow ground blades and they're available on Amazon of all places. David Minshaw helped out with a clean copy of the label to reproduce..
IMG_20220319_143222.jpg
 

Johnnyntrain

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In anticipation of working up some loads for my PH Whitworth and Volunteer I finally decided on some molds to try. Both molds are supposed to cast a .442 in pure lead for paper patching with vintage .002 onion skin paper. The cylindrical mold should cast a 500 grain, 530 grain, and 550 grain bullet but I won't know that until I have a chance to cast some and test them. The same goes for the hexagonal mold but I'm not sure of the grain weight until I cast a few of them as well. The upside is that I can use both the cylindrical and hexagonal in the Whitworth and I will have an assortment of weights to test in the Volunteer with the cylindrical mold. I also had Tom at Accurate make 2 different nose styles on the cylindrical mold to see what if any difference there is. My guess is that it won't change anything but I like to tinker so it should View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133 be interesting to see what happens. View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133
I use a Lee Medford mold and paper patch with 72 gr of 2F. I experiment a lot too. Found a cork wad with a hex punch works as well as felt. I use two kinds of paper, both vellum .002 and .003. The latter will shoot a couple inches higher though. I push the .003 through a .450 sizer to just compress the paper, not hard to get down but not silky smooth like with .002 paper. Nice hex mold keep us informed on how you like it.
 

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TFoley

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WW mould with the helix where made by George Arnold of Jersey C I (UK) but I expect he,s not doing them now David might know & I bought one years ago .exellent quality they where . Rudyard .

Jersey IS part of the Channel Islands, but it is NOT part of the UK - just sayin'.
 

TFoley

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That mold would look perfect in here-

Reproduction Whitworth case I made from pix for a member on this forum. He's been collecting all the other goodies that populate the storage areas. One item of note is a set of 3 gunsmith screwdrivers with blued hollow ground blades and they're available on Amazon of all places. David Minshaw helped out with a clean copy of the label to reproduce..
View attachment 141307

Beautiful work!! Back a few months to when I re-acquired my P-H Whitworth I asked a local cabinet-maker it he could price one of these for me - the answer was a staggering $800. If you still have the principal dimensions you could pass on to me, I'll have a go at making one myself, although I should be able to figure them out from having the rifle to hand.
 

dave951

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Beautiful work!! Back a few months to when I re-acquired my P-H Whitworth I asked a local cabinet-maker it he could price one of these for me - the answer was a staggering $800. If you still have the principal dimensions you could pass on to me, I'll have a go at making one myself, although I should be able to figure them out from having the rifle to hand.

I based the one I made on proportions from pictures of originals and scaling that to the Whitworth repop my friend had on hand. Nice to know what others would charge to make one though. I was thinking in the $600 range but I'm a cheap date sometimes.
 

Rudyard

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I'm sorry to report that George sadly passed away on 15 September 2021 at the age of 78. Greatly missed.

David
Sorry to hear that. He & all the Jersey contingent where good fellows. Dave Dorgan bought my matchlock entry every year saved me taking it home . Even number 88 of 1988 that won me the only gold gong I won in the Courtney cup .
Regards & Thankyou Rudyard
 
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That mold would look perfect in here-

Reproduction Whitworth case I made from pix for a member on this forum. He's been collecting all the other goodies that populate the storage areas. One item of note is a set of 3 gunsmith screwdrivers with blued hollow ground blades and they're available on Amazon of all places. David Minshaw helped out with a clean copy of the label to reproduce..
View attachment 141307
very nice. I would like to have something like that for my gibbs.
 
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The use of trick molds for the Whitworth is totally unnecessary. The Parker Hale that I have came with no accessories at all. I simply used a Brooks Custom mold for my BPCR .45-70 and sized it .450 on the two bottom bands. 60 grains of 1FG and a round card wad has given me the legendary accuracy that a Whitworth is famous for. You wasted your money on trick molds. Paper patching is an ancient and discredited method of making an easy job harder. If you wish to proceed on this folly you have a good start.
While they shoot just as well a cylindrical bullet has none of the 6 sided bullets charisma or mystique, with or without paper. YMMV
 

jefair1

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In anticipation of working up some loads for my PH Whitworth and Volunteer I finally decided on some molds to try. Both molds are supposed to cast a .442 in pure lead for paper patching with vintage .002 onion skin paper. The cylindrical mold should cast a 500 grain, 530 grain, and 550 grain bullet but I won't know that until I have a chance to cast some and test them. The same goes for the hexagonal mold but I'm not sure of the grain weight until I cast a few of them as well. The upside is that I can use both the cylindrical and hexagonal in the Whitworth and I will have an assortment of weights to test in the Volunteer with the cylindrical mold. I also had Tom at Accurate make 2 different nose styles on the cylindrical mold to see what if any difference there is. My guess is that it won't change anything but I like to tinker so it should View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133 be interesting to see what happens. View attachment 141130 View attachment 141131 View attachment 141132 View attachment 141133
Why did you go to a flat tip bullet instead of a rounded or pointed one?
 
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