Matchlock Pistols did they exist?

Discussion in 'Pre-Flintlock' started by Ironage451, Oct 4, 2016.

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  1. May 8, 2019 #41

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Lee,
    As is usually the case, we can never say "never" or "always" !

    Having said that, European matchlock pistols are more or less unknown. I am sure they have it wrong in the Jamestown case, but not visited thread yet!
    Henry V111 had some matchlock shield pistols , and some remain in the Tower or the collection in Leeds.
    There were laws to forbid the making and carrying of such pistols in Europe in the early days, but to all intents and purposes, any examples have long since disappeared.

    All the best,
    Richard.
     
  2. May 10, 2019 #42

    LEE TIMMINS

    LEE TIMMINS

    LEE TIMMINS

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    Thanks for your response Richard.
     
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  3. May 11, 2019 #43

    rickystl

    rickystl

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    Interesting Thread. I've never even seen a photo of an authenticated European matchlock pistol. And there would probably be no practical use for one during the period. Which was probably one of the reasons the wheellock was invented - for use on horseback.
    I've read that the Japanese matchlock pistols were used more to symbolize rank/stature than anything else. Part of a dress code similar to the rapier sword during the Renaissance period. And possibly for occasional sporting use (?).

    Rick
     
  4. May 18, 2019 #44

    russellshaffer

    russellshaffer

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    Here's one for you. A youtube video that unfortunately isn't in English. It's a breechloading combination wheel lock and snap matchlock pistol. An extremely complicated firearm and I have no way to tell if it is original or a modern invention. I don't really see how a person could have built it with hand tools in the time period when it might have been made but those old guys did know their stuff.
     
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  5. May 19, 2019 #45

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    That's our pal Bolek from Poland isn't it, Russellshafter?

    He's very good with this sort of thing.

    I don't know if it is a direct copy though, but it looks half familiar!
     
  6. May 19, 2019 #46

    russellshaffer

    russellshaffer

    russellshaffer

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    Yes, it is Bolek. Does he actually build this kind of masterpiece ?
     
  7. May 19, 2019 #47

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Yes, Russell, Bolek builds these.
    Look up his wheel-locks, they are very reliable and impressive! He has a few showing firing the priming, and they never miss a beat.
     
  8. Aug 10, 2019 #48

    SgtWinterer

    SgtWinterer

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    These "combination" locks are historically correct and while not common, not extremly rare.
    It's not adding that much more complexity or weight compared to a wheellock alone.

    One thing to keep in mind is, that these were exclusivly made for the nobility and not the arm
    of a common soldier or frontier man.

    Under ideal weather conditions the matchlock has some advantage over the wheellock.
    The idea would be to use, what suited best, and to have an backup option.

    http://www.engerisser.de/Bilder/Waffen/Bilder 2009/Petronel 1572 gross.jpg

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    Looking at the examples, it looks like, they are all fromt the 1570s to 1630s era.
     
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  9. Aug 10, 2019 #49

    Poguetx

    Poguetx

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    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has a special exhibition thru Sept 2 called "Artistry of the Gunsmith: Columbus through Napoleon". They have several examples of the combination matchlock/wheellock on display. The exhibit takes a little over an hour to get through, and they have probably 200+ guns. Well worth it if you're in Houston.
     
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  10. Aug 11, 2019 #50

    rickystl

    rickystl

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    Speaking of dual ignition, here is a unique specimen. It is known that the Locals in India continued to use their Torador style matchlocks all the way to about 1880. But here is one from the Coorg Region of Southwestern India. The owner of this gun wanted flintlock ignition but was also not willing to completely give up the match ignition. Notice the separate triggers for each. Never seen another one.

    Rick 001 (Medium).JPG 009 (Medium).JPG 016 (Medium).JPG
     
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  11. Aug 20, 2019 at 12:46 AM #51

    jackley

    jackley

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    Well take this as you may.
    "One of earliest European revolving hand guns know to survive is a three barreled matchlock revolver now in the Palazzo Ducale collection in Venice. Through the research into the old archives, scholar General A. Gaibi discovered that the pistol was indeed genuine. It appeared in the inventory of the Palazzo Ducale when it was still an armory in 1548." It was probably made in Brescia around the year 1500."
    This was taken from the book of miniature Arms by Merrill Lindsay.
    I have no way to put a pic up of this pistol. It has a straight grip and 3 revolving barrels.
     
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