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Longer Barrels On Small Caliber ML

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I would like to preface this by stating that I have never even seen a SMR or any other longer barreled ML in real life.

Also, I fully realize that good accuracy can be had with shorter ML.

I also know that different rifling can make a difference in accuracy.

With that said, this thread is for the folks that actually own a longer barreled, **small caliber** ML, or has shot them enough to know.

Generally speaking, are **small caliber** ML with longer barrels more steady to hold on target than shorter ML? And yes, I realize weight makes a difference. What I'm referring to is the actual hold steady aspect of a longer ML, especially offhanded or using a tree as a rest.

Are there any advantages of the longer barrels in, lets say, a .32 caliber, .36 caliber and possibly a .40 caliber?
 
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I aint no sharp shooter but everything I read says the longer distance between rear and front sight on rifle makes a big difference in accuracy.
What’s SMR?
Southern Mountain Rifle.

Yes indeed, a longer sight radius does help. But I'm referring to the actual hold steady aspect.
 
It is all about the weight distribution of the individual rifle.

A long skinny barrel on a .32 suits me just fine if the balance point is a couple of inches behind the rear entry pipe.

The same length of barrel that has the balance point a few inches ahead of the rear entry pipe is to muzzle heavy for me.

Now some people will say they like a muzzle heavy rifle as it "hangs" better on target, true only to a point, when it gets so muzzle heavy that the butt of the gun tries to go upward when you hold the gun off hand that is to much. You will not be able to hold it still.

Been there, done that.
 
It is all about the weight distribution of the individual rifle.

A long skinny barrel on a .32 suits me just fine if the balance point is a couple of inches behind the rear entry pipe.

The same length of barrel that has the balance point a few inches ahead of the rear entry pipe is to muzzle heavy for me.

Now some people will say they like a muzzle heavy rifle as it "hangs" better on target, true only to a point, when it gets so muzzle heavy that the butt of the gun tries to go upward when you hold the gun off hand that is to much. You will not be able to hold it still.

Been there, done that.
Thanks for the input, FC. I was hoping you would comment.

And yes, I am more interested in a .32 or .36 caliber for squirrel hunting. Per my own standards, I much prefer a any rifle with a shorter barrel. However, as you have stated, I had a feeling there was more to this one might think. Barrel balance is important.

What I am interested in researching is specifically for squirrel hunting. After a lot of actual squirrel hunting in the mountains of the SE, I cannot help but think that a longer barrel might very well lead to a steadier hold on many shots, either offhanded or trees are used to get a rest off of.

Perhaps my thinking is flawed, IDK? If so, someone out there please correct me if so.
 
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I have a long rifle with a 42-inch 32 cal barrel. It is swamped, which helps to reduce weight and put the balance just behind the entry pipe, and I find it comfortable to hold for quite some time as I line up my shot. The longer sight distance is good for my aging eyesight and accuracy has always been excellent.

I've not carried or fired a short 32 or 36 for comparison, and don't see a need to acquire one as I'm very happy with what I have, but I don't think a long rifle should be much more difficult to carry in the squirrel woods than a short one.
 
I have a long rifle with a 42-inch 32 cal barrel. It is swamped, which helps to reduce weight and put the balance just behind the entry pipe, and I find it comfortable to hold for quite some time as I line up my shot. The longer sight distance is good for my aging eyesight and accuracy has always been excellent.

I've not carried or fired a short 32 or 36 for comparison, and don't see a need to acquire one as I'm very happy with what I have, but I don't think a long rifle should be much more difficult to carry in the squirrel woods than a short one.
What is entry pipe?
 
What does have an effect on off hand shooting with a longer barrel is how long it takes the ball to exit the barrel after the trigger is pulled. The longer the ball is in the barrel the more time there is for wobble or poor follow through to cause a bad shot. It only takes a few thousands at the muzzle to have a large effect on the target.
 
I Have had short barreled small caliber rifles (.32 & .36) with 24 and 28" barrels that i used for squirrel hunting. Then I got a .32 with a 42" barrel and found I was hitting far more squirrels with it, especially at the longer (35-40 yards) ranges. I now have flint and percussion guns in .32 & .36, and they all have 41" or 42" barrels. They shoot better than I can hold at 70 years young. They seem to hang better on target whereas the shorter barreled guns tended to wobble more for me. It could be the balance of the longer guns, IDK, but I definitely shoot the longer barrels better.
 
What does have an effect on off hand shooting with a longer barrel is how long it takes the ball to exit the barrel after the trigger is pulled. The longer the ball is in the barrel the more time there is for wobble or poor follow through to cause a bad shot. It only takes a few thousands at the muzzle to have a large effect on the target.
Very true but consider the chunk gun I mentioned. It was never intended to be fire off hand, the whole idea of a chunk match is to fire from a rested position.
Granted it would have been a specialty gun even when made and even more so now.
 
Here’s my .02 Ed. I have three squirrel guns. A T/C Cherokee.32, a Crockett.32 and a kibler.36 smr. My kibler is my favorite by far and best shooting BUT I don’t care for the 44” barrel for hunting. I’ve just started building an Issac Haines style .36 with a 38” barrel. I feel this will be a perfect squirrel gun for ME.

I really enjoy shooting my kibler. Love the gun. Just wish it was 6” shorter. I wish we were closer. I’d let you try it and see. Good luck with your quest.
 
Here’s my .02 Ed. I have three squirrel guns. A T/C Cherokee.32, a Crockett.32 and a kibler.36 smr. My kibler is my favorite by far and best shooting BUT I don’t care for the 44” barrel for hunting. I’ve just started building an Issac Haines style .36 with a 38” barrel. I feel this will be a perfect squirrel gun for ME.

I really enjoy shooting my kibler. Love the gun. Just wish it was 6” shorter. I wish we were closer. I’d let you try it and see. Good luck with your quest.
I tend to concur with you on too long of barrel. I would think 44" would be a bit long for my liking. 36" to 38" seems like it would be about the perfect length, for the practical aspect anyway.
 
I have shot the Kiber in .40 w 44” bbl pretty extensivly at paper. I have shot some 3” 5 shot groups at 110 yards. I have regularly shot tight groups at 50 yards But anything seems to do that. The gun does not carry as well as it is barrel heavy. It would not look as good but would be much easier to carry.
as for the long barrel one can shoot very good groups with a 6” barrel if the principals of marksmanship are observed. I doubt 6 “ difference in a rifle barrel could be noticed.
Accuracy is generally fouind when barrel vibration is consisten. This should happen with a shorter stiffer barrel.
 
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