Heavier than Lead

Discussion in 'General Muzzleloading' started by William Sublette, Jan 17, 2020.

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  1. Jan 17, 2020 #1

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

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    Hi, new guy here.

    Been into black powder rifles for about 25yrs

    Just for hunting, and my friend has drug me to a few rendezvous.

    Has anyone tried casting round balls with the new heavier than lead metals found in the waterfowl, and coyote shotshells like heavi shot?

    I tried searching the forum, but my search game isn't very tight today. Didn't have much luck.

    Other than being expensive, it seems like it might improve the bc of a roundball, and maybe even let guys still use their guns in states like CA.

    Just curious.
     
  2. Jan 17, 2020 #2

    QuinnTheEskimo

    QuinnTheEskimo

    QuinnTheEskimo

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    I could be wrong, but I don’t think those pellets are cast. I think most of them are metals bound together with polymer.
     
  3. Jan 17, 2020 #3

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    I think some of them are also sintered. That's basically compressing the material together and subjecting it to extremely high temperatures to fuse the materials into a solid. Not something anyone without industrial type equipment could do.
     
  4. Jan 18, 2020 #4

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

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    it's not just the density, but the maleability to be able to deform to create the seal. Do you know anything about those properties? I'd be willing to give it a try.

    On a related note, I watched a You Tube of a guy creating a solid gold slug that he shot, about 1 1/2 oz. Or about $2300 in today's market. Accuracy was ok I guess, but it deformed very quickly (he shot in to a bunch of stacked phone books to make sure he could get it all back). He did the same thing with a .999 Fine Silver slug too. Only about a $25 chunk of metal. It was much harder and had greater penetration, but he still wanted to get it back.
     
  5. Jan 18, 2020 #5

    Spikebuck

    Spikebuck

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    A few years ago forum member roundball did successful experiments using brass round balls as a sub for lead. He didn't cast them himself and commercially available ones were limited in useful sizes. If I recall he found a .526 that he used with a thick patch in a .54...or might have been a .562 in a .58. Net was they shot really well and also passed penetration tests. So this may be a viable option for our friends in California.

    Not heavier than lead, but an option.
     
  6. Jan 18, 2020 #6

    cankeney

    cankeney

    cankeney

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    Given the price of Heavy Shot, gold might be a more economical option.
     
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  7. Jan 20, 2020 #7

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

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    Thanks for the info, I wondered if it might not melt handily.
     
  8. Jan 20, 2020 #8

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

    Scota@4570

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    The only option for casting yourself is bismuth. https://www.rotometals.com/lead-free-bullet-casting-alloy-bismuth-based/ It is less dense than lead and harder. You will need a smaller mould than what you use for lead.

    You can also buy ITX https://www.ballisticproducts.com/Roundballs/products/704/ It is also less dense than lead and hard.

    With either one there is a risk or sticking a ball halfway in the bore. My advice is to avoid all non lead options unless it means you have to stay home. They are all crappy.
     
  9. Jan 20, 2020 #9

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

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    No, my interest was a ball that's heavier.

    But after i found the right google terms i learned that most heavi shot is tungsten, nickel, and iron in some combo.


    The pita factor plus cost would be prohibitive.


    It would have to be smaller with thick patching, and even then, might not be nice on your favorite barrel.
     
  10. Jan 20, 2020 #10

    F.G. Ford

    F.G. Ford

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    Tungsten, even patched would NOT be good for your barrel.
    Getting a ball stuck hard in a barrel could prove to be a bomb.
    Trying to pull the ball would be another story.
    Throw out the barrel keep the tang and make another gun.
    I think it would be easier to move to a friendlier state. Now that would be a positive option!
    Fred
     
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  11. Jan 20, 2020 #11

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

    William Sublette

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    I was just thinking out loud, I live in NE. Couldn't do commieforina.
     
  12. Jan 21, 2020 #12

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

    Col. Batguano

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    If we're in the realm of the truly exotic, you could cast them (1130C melting point) out of depleted uranium, which will run you about $330 per oz. It has a Mohs hardness of 6, and steel is 5. You'd better patch it well, because it won't obdurate in the barrel to fill the rifling. The density is about twice that of lead, and you won't be able to get a screw in to it if you dry ball.

    It is used in anti-armor artillery shells, (they sabot the projectile which is a flechette) so it might be handy if the deer decide to start driving Sherman tanks next year.
     

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