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When I was a little fella, my grandad bred and sold Walkers as a side job and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them. I remember my grandma cooking coon. Seems like she would boil them several times because they were so greasy. Then she'd give it to grandad and he'd barbecue it. I'd stand around with the men learning new cuss words while they drank Red White and Blue beer and passed a jar of creek liquor around and barbecued coon. Good times. None of them left now.

We never had your Moonshine contraband Stills (shame on you heathens LOL) here in the real Great Southland, but our Grandmas and great Grandmas certainly knew how to make "christmas wine" out of any fruit at hand.....every month of the year.
 
When I was a little fella, my grandad bred and sold Walkers as a side job and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them. I remember my grandma cooking coon. Seems like she would boil them several times because they were so greasy. Then she'd give it to grandad and he'd barbecue it. I'd stand around with the men learning new cuss words while they drank Red White and Blue beer and passed a jar of creek liquor around and barbecued coon. Good times. None of them left now.

"my grandad bred and sold Walkers as a side job and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them."

Where I come from "Walkers" were them ladies who ply their unmentionable trade along certain well knowm streets in various cities and/or large towns.
".....and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them." Now thats an impressive family history IMHO !
 
No-one, and I mean no-one can blend with a song like George Strait, pure Honeyed voice without a doubt.



George Strait is an excellent musician, one of the best of all time and I'm not a county music kind of fellow.

I don't have my guitar, a log to set on or a camp fire, so you'll have to use your imagination a little and tolerate my sense of humor a lot;

"Armadillo in the Morning, Armadillo greasy to the bone. My gut aches Badly, got me yacking on my knees. I ain't got a dime, but that diarrhea is mine. I ain't rich, lord it burns when I pee. Armadillo in the morning, Armadillo it hates me."
 
George Strait is an excellent musician, one of the best of all time and I'm not a county music kind of fellow.

I don't have my guitar, a log to set on or a camp fire, so you'll have to use your imagination a little and tolerate my sense of humor a lot;

"Armadillo in the Morning, Armadillo greasy to the bone. My gut aches Badly, got me yacking on my knees. I ain't got a dime, but that diarrhea is mine. I ain't rich, lord it burns when I pee. Armadillo in the morning, Armadillo it hates me."

You should develop those lyrics more, we need such humor in these sad times.
 
But you’re in MML & we cuss a little here & there in there too.
I’ve always addressed ppl like you, like this; if you don’t cuss, fine. If you think I can’t cuss, bc you don’t, you’re dead wrong. If you don’t like what I say, or how I say it, don’t talk to me. Period!
It’s rare that an adult doesn’t cuss a little here & there. I promise you that well over half the ppl you sit with on Sunday cuss & do a whole lot of other stuff they will condemn others for doing. I’ve seen the BS hypocrisy all my life. I just LOL & SMFH now & stay clear of those ppl.
You’re pretty screwed socially anywhere not wanting to interact with ppl for a little innocent cuss word on the occasion.
So are you going to leave MML too be there is some cussing in there too?
Adios
wonder what he says when he hits his finger with a hammer. lol.
 
When I was a little fella, my grandad bred and sold Walkers as a side job and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them. I remember my grandma cooking coon. Seems like she would boil them several times because they were so greasy. Then she'd give it to grandad and he'd barbecue it. I'd stand around with the men learning new cuss words while they drank Red White and Blue beer and passed a jar of creek liquor around and barbecued coon. Good times. None of them left now.
good times 4sure
 
"my grandad bred and sold Walkers as a side job and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them."

Where I come from "Walkers" were them ladies who ply their unmentionable trade along certain well knowm streets in various cities and/or large towns.
".....and he would always hunt them a few times before selling them." Now thats an impressive family history IMHO !
I'd be willing to bet his Walkers were more appreciated than your version.
 
I lived in South Louisiana all my life and I don’t know of anyone who eats possums or armadillos. I know we get a bum rap that we eat anything that won’t eat us first. That’s not true, we just know how to survive.
I lived in Louisiana for 10 years and people would tell me if you go to a local restaurant on the west bank it is best to not ask too many questions about what's on the menu
 
I was yakking with a friend who trapped 37 armadillos over the past year on her farm in Missouri and the topic of 'dillo as table fare came up. Apparently it was on more than one American table as "Hoover Hog" during the Depression and is alleged to taste like high-quality pork. I have since heard from three fellas who have personally eaten it and all agreed it was excellent. I kinda like the critters so am in no hurry to dispatch one, but it is interesting to know.
https://armadillo-online.org/food.h...los,traditional ingredient in Oaxaca, Mexico.
Nothing beats a good sweet and sour venison liver pate….
 
Oldwood, did you eat the muskrats? They are sold in restaurants as "marsh rabbit". It is a nice red meat. I prefer groundhog or squirrel.
 
In SW Pa. where I grew up , it was ground hogs. Neighbors ate them , everybody on hard times in coal country dined on them. In northern W.Va. , it was coons , nature took care of folks on hard times , when the mines shut down.
You forgot to mention 'possum.
This little ditty came from my wife, I never heard it till she started singing one day.

"Possum sitting on a Hickory limb, hi-a-way hi-away home"
"We will make short work of him, hi-a-way hi-away home"
"Put him in a pan and cook him sweet, then he's fit for a King to eat"
"Possum gravy can't be beat, hi-away hi-a-way home"
 
There is a seven-page thread on armadillo hunting over on castboolits.com, and a Cajun gentleman named Gary from Baton Rouge shared this very interesting recipe for Armadillo Sauce Picante.
I may try it with pork, not having any fresh 'dillo in the fridge.

Armadillo Sauce Picante

Shared by Gary of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

serves 8

About 4 1/2 lbs. of Armadillo Meat (see Note #1)
cleaned and cut up into equal sized pieces.
1 cup Bacon Grease or Vegetable Oil - divided
3/4 Cup all-purpose Flour.
2 cups chopped Yellow Onion
1 Cup chopped Bell Pepper
1/2 cup chopped Celery
2 Tablespoons chopped Garlic (about 5 cloves)
6 ozs. Tomato Paste (small can)
1 Cup Dry White Wine
4 cups Chicken Stock
28 ounces diced or crushed Tomatoes
1 or 2 Jalapeno Peppers - chopped (seeds and ribs removed)
1 teaspoon dried Red Pepper Flakes
1 bunch Green Onions - chopped (tops and bottoms)
3 Tablespoons Sugar.
2 Tablespoons Worcestershire
4 Tablespoons fresh chopped Parsley

Seasonings :
1 Tablespoon Creole Seasoning Blend ( Like Tony's or your favorite)
plus some extra for the meat.
1/2 teaspoon dry Thyme
2 Bay leaves

Instructions:
Clean and cut the meat into equal sized pieces ( See Note #1)
Season with Creole or all purpose seasoning and place in refg. untill needed .
Heat 2-3 Tablespoons Veg. oil (or bacon grease) in a Dutch Oven (or chicken fryer w/ lid) on Med.-High heat, brown the meat pieces on each side , about 4 mins per side . Remove the browned meat from the dutch oven to a platter and set aside .
Lower the heat to Medium , add the remaining oil (bacon grease) and when the oil is hot and shimmering , add the flour and whisk or stir for 5 to 8 minutes to make a Dark Roux ... scrape the pan bottom , do not let Roux stick or burn ... whisk or stir constantly ... if you burn he roux , start over .
When the Roux is dark brown ... remove pan from fire and add the Trinity - Onions , Bell Pepper and Celery stir untill the hot Roux is cooled a bit and then saute the back on med. heat until onions are soft and translucent .
Next add Garlic , some of the Red Pepper Flakes and about 1/2 of the spices that are listed ( but not the bay leaves , they come later ) continue to saute untill the spices are aromatic about 2 mins ( the heat releases the aromatics) .
Maintaining Medium Heat stir the Tomato paste into the Roux-onion mixture and saute 5 to 8 mins while the tomato paste browns slightly ... Keep stirring so it doesn't stick or burn !
Add the white wine and mix throughly , scrape the pan bottom . Saute another 5 mins. untill the wine has incorporated into the roux-onion-tomato paste .
Now add the whole tomatoes which you crush with your hands ( this was what my Mom did ... I buy diced or crushed tomatoes ) add all liquid with tomatoes .
Then add Worchestersire , sugar , about 1/2 of the remaining seasonings , jalapeno peppers and bay leaves . Mix thoroughly and simmer about 5 mins.
Increase the heat to Med-High and stir in the stock .Stir well and bring to a high simmer then lower the heat and continue on a slight simmer for 45 mins , partially cover the pot and stir often .
Add the browned meat , including any meat juice , the remaining herbs , spices and Green Onions . Continue to simmer for 1-2 hours untill the meat is tender and the sauce nice and thick . Cover the pot the first 45 mins. uncover and cook to thicken the sauce . When done taste and adjust seasonings to taste .

Serve over white rice with hot buttered French Bread and a green salad.

Notes;
#1) You can use this recipe with any of the following:
Chicken , Alligator , Rabbit , Squirrel , Nutria , Venison (deer meat) , Wild Hog even domestic pork ... You don't have to use no Armadillo !
I have cooked / eaten Sauce Piquante made with all of the meats listed and they are all great !
#2) This dish is better the next day ... and it Freezes very well .
#3) Add more heat by adding additional chopped Jalapeno's ... to me this taste's better than pepper in a sauce piquante .
 
There is a seven-page thread on armadillo hunting over on castboolits.com, and a Cajun gentleman named Gary from Baton Rouge shared this very interesting recipe for Armadillo Sauce Picante.
I may try it with pork, not having any fresh 'dillo in the fridge.

Armadillo Sauce Picante

Shared by Gary of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

serves 8

About 4 1/2 lbs. of Armadillo Meat (see Note #1)
cleaned and cut up into equal sized pieces.
1 cup Bacon Grease or Vegetable Oil - divided
3/4 Cup all-purpose Flour.
2 cups chopped Yellow Onion
1 Cup chopped Bell Pepper
1/2 cup chopped Celery
2 Tablespoons chopped Garlic (about 5 cloves)
6 ozs. Tomato Paste (small can)
1 Cup Dry White Wine
4 cups Chicken Stock
28 ounces diced or crushed Tomatoes
1 or 2 Jalapeno Peppers - chopped (seeds and ribs removed)
1 teaspoon dried Red Pepper Flakes
1 bunch Green Onions - chopped (tops and bottoms)
3 Tablespoons Sugar.
2 Tablespoons Worcestershire
4 Tablespoons fresh chopped Parsley

Seasonings :
1 Tablespoon Creole Seasoning Blend ( Like Tony's or your favorite)
plus some extra for the meat.
1/2 teaspoon dry Thyme
2 Bay leaves

Instructions:
Clean and cut the meat into equal sized pieces ( See Note #1)
Season with Creole or all purpose seasoning and place in refg. untill needed .
Heat 2-3 Tablespoons Veg. oil (or bacon grease) in a Dutch Oven (or chicken fryer w/ lid) on Med.-High heat, brown the meat pieces on each side , about 4 mins per side . Remove the browned meat from the dutch oven to a platter and set aside .
Lower the heat to Medium , add the remaining oil (bacon grease) and when the oil is hot and shimmering , add the flour and whisk or stir for 5 to 8 minutes to make a Dark Roux ... scrape the pan bottom , do not let Roux stick or burn ... whisk or stir constantly ... if you burn he roux , start over .
When the Roux is dark brown ... remove pan from fire and add the Trinity - Onions , Bell Pepper and Celery stir untill the hot Roux is cooled a bit and then saute the back on med. heat until onions are soft and translucent .
Next add Garlic , some of the Red Pepper Flakes and about 1/2 of the spices that are listed ( but not the bay leaves , they come later ) continue to saute untill the spices are aromatic about 2 mins ( the heat releases the aromatics) .
Maintaining Medium Heat stir the Tomato paste into the Roux-onion mixture and saute 5 to 8 mins while the tomato paste browns slightly ... Keep stirring so it doesn't stick or burn !
Add the white wine and mix throughly , scrape the pan bottom . Saute another 5 mins. untill the wine has incorporated into the roux-onion-tomato paste .
Now add the whole tomatoes which you crush with your hands ( this was what my Mom did ... I buy diced or crushed tomatoes ) add all liquid with tomatoes .
Then add Worchestersire , sugar , about 1/2 of the remaining seasonings , jalapeno peppers and bay leaves . Mix thoroughly and simmer about 5 mins.
Increase the heat to Med-High and stir in the stock .Stir well and bring to a high simmer then lower the heat and continue on a slight simmer for 45 mins , partially cover the pot and stir often .
Add the browned meat , including any meat juice , the remaining herbs , spices and Green Onions . Continue to simmer for 1-2 hours untill the meat is tender and the sauce nice and thick . Cover the pot the first 45 mins. uncover and cook to thicken the sauce . When done taste and adjust seasonings to taste .

Serve over white rice with hot buttered French Bread and a green salad.

Notes;
#1) You can use this recipe with any of the following:
Chicken , Alligator , Rabbit , Squirrel , Nutria , Venison (deer meat) , Wild Hog even domestic pork ... You don't have to use no Armadillo !
I have cooked / eaten Sauce Piquante made with all of the meats listed and they are all great !
#2) This dish is better the next day ... and it Freezes very well .
#3) Add more heat by adding additional chopped Jalapeno's ... to me this taste's better than pepper in a sauce piquante .
As Jeff Foxworthy said, Cajuns are some of the best cooks in the world long as you don't ask too many questions!
 
I was yakking with a friend who trapped 37 armadillos over the past year on her farm in Missouri and the topic of 'dillo as table fare came up. Apparently it was on more than one American table as "Hoover Hog" during the Depression and is alleged to taste like high-quality pork. I have since heard from three fellas who have personally eaten it and all agreed it was excellent. I kinda like the critters so am in no hurry to dispatch one, but it is interesting to know.
https://armadillo-online.org/food.h...los,traditional ingredient in Oaxaca, Mexico.
It is difficult being any kind of wild animal these days. My attitude: if you don't need it to eat, let it be. That's just me.
 
As Jeff Foxworthy said, Cajuns are some of the best cooks in the world long as you don't ask too many questions!
I remember reading a short story about little green aliens making first contact with earth. As they had green fur and only two feet high they didn’t look too monstist
They sent out a message that the people of earth were vicious and to stay away from earth. This was their last message from a strange swamp called loosy annas
The next foot note is this et tu fe from this green nutria. Never trapped one before but they sure were good with rice
 
Trapped muskrats in the early 50's. We trapped a tidal swamp, now known as the meadowlands. We would feed the carcasses to the dogs, since the mud they lived in stunk to high heaven. One day we got a newspaper, this happened across the Hudson River from New York City. There was an article about a restaurant serving a Blue Plate Special. It was a muskrat and they were charging $5 for the dish. This was when a coffee was 10 cents and a hamburger was a quarter.
 
I’ve eaten Armadillo once. However, it was over 60 years ago. I was 7 or 8 and was at my Dad’s deer camp. Me and another boy wandered off with our .22s and I shot one. Brought it back and the old camp cook fixed it for us. I think he fried it, but I really don’t remember how or the taste. But I’m still here.
 
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