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Login Name Post: pasties {the food kind}        (Topic#302539)
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6420
Loyalist Dave
03-13-18 06:24 AM - Post#1674063    

    In response to RJDH

  • Quote:
At one time, a pastie would have a dessert -type filling in one end, (Apples or whatever)and the mean and taties in the other. (This According to an old Cornish lass who seemed to know about these things.



Please see the Bedfordshire Clanger. Make the meat portion with bacon and you get a bacon badger

LD

 
RJDH 
40 Cal.
Posts: 211
03-13-18 08:39 AM - Post#1674077    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

Thanks for the link Dave, I will look it up. :-)

Just did look it up, and it sounds about right!

Richard.

Edited by RJDH on 03-13-18 08:43 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Dragonsfire 
40 Cal.
Posts: 394
Dragonsfire
03-13-18 09:59 AM - Post#1674091    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

http://www.goodtoknow.co.uk/recipes/550269/bedfordshire-clan...



Edited by Dragonsfire on 03-13-18 10:00 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Kansas Jake 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1333
03-13-18 04:30 PM - Post#1674121    

    In response to Dragonsfire

I had never heard of them until we visited my daughter in Michigan. I like them. Down here we have bier rocks and in Nebraska they have Runzas. Those two are similar. They are a pastry filled with meat(usually ground beef or ground pork sausage or a combination)with cabbage and onion and spices and then baked. Spices often are just salt and pepper.

 
nhmoose 
54 Cal.
Posts: 1827
nhmoose
03-13-18 06:07 PM - Post#1674139    

    In response to Kansas Jake

HC/PC hot pocket if you warm it on the side of the fire or your armpit before eating.

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6420
Loyalist Dave
03-14-18 08:35 AM - Post#1674214    

    In response to Kansas Jake

The first I ever had were Jamaican pasties...spicey and sometimes made of goat (so I was glad of the spices). Then we got a woman in our group from Michigan, and she made pashties, which were similar, but not the spice, and more of a doughy shell (more akin to a soft pretzel than the flaky dough of its Jamaican cousin). I had a Cornish pasty made by an English woman which was very similar to the Michigan version, and I've had a few clangers which were in a crust similar to a thin pizza crust, like a calzone....OH yeah, don't forget the Calzone in all of this!

I don't include Perogi's in this, as I think they belong with Ravioli. Of course that's assuming that I've seen enough versions of Perogi that I have a good handle on the product.

Like the history of the Cornish Pasty, we found that issuing the lads a couple of pasties when they were going from camp before noon, and going to be in skirmishes on and off until return at about tea-time..., worked very well. Most ate one right after heading out..., and then had the other at about 2 in the afternoon. Saved a lot of cleaning in camp, and saved on wood.

I'd think they'd be excellent for folks venturing out from the hunting camp for the day, especially in cold conditions when one needs more calories and finds the body temp dropping while sitting still for several hours to ambush a deer. Also an excelling item for carrying in one's haversack for lunch when at a market fair.

LD



 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 13584
Colorado Clyde
03-14-18 09:40 AM - Post#1674221    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

"Calzone"....How did I miss that one...


 
satx78247 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5993
03-14-18 11:22 AM - Post#1674246    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

ALL of the "authentic" Cornish/Welsh pasty recipes that I've found on "the Worldwidewierd" include "Swede" as an ingredient. - I tried to look that up & found that "Swede" is "turnip" with no other description.

Do any of our members know WHICH sort of turnip??

yours, satx


 
Spence10 
Cannon
Posts: 6594
03-14-18 12:04 PM - Post#1674249    

    In response to satx78247

Swede is rutabaga.

Spence

 
satx78247 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5993
03-14-18 12:54 PM - Post#1674253    

    In response to Spence10

THANKS. = All of the usual search engines say: TURNIP.
(At least to me, a rutabaga is not the same vegetable.)

yours, satx


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 13584
Colorado Clyde
03-14-18 01:51 PM - Post#1674262    

    In response to Spence10

  • Spence10 Said:
Swede is rutabaga.

Spence


And is often called "yellow turnip"


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7190
tenngun
03-14-18 04:31 PM - Post#1674283    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

My dad was raised in Wisconsin and my mother in Rhode Island my Father always said yellow turnip, my mother rutabaga, it was one of those life long pseudo fusses that married people do.

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6420
Loyalist Dave
03-15-18 02:25 PM - Post#1674449    

    In response to tenngun

Like some folks callin' sweet taters a "yam" ?

LD

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7190
tenngun
03-15-18 02:41 PM - Post#1674453    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

I don’t know if I have ever had a real yam. We had a lot of wild sweet potato grew around my place in Arkansas but every one called it wild yam.
Or visaversa, I don’t know which is which.

 
Loyalist Dave 
Cannon
Posts: 6420
Loyalist Dave
03-16-18 11:21 AM - Post#1674598    

    In response to tenngun

A true yam is an edible tuber from a plant species in the genus Dioscorea that is a vine, while a sweet potato is Ipomoea batatas, and I believe they are from a plant, not the root of a vine.

I believe that where yams actually are part of the diet, Africans brought from those areas as slaves thought the sweet potato resembled the proper yam, so called sweet potatoes by the same term.


Of course I'm told that a peanut is a legume, not a nut, although when one reads a label that says "does not contain nuts" it means peanuts as well as nuts from trees.



LD

 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7190
tenngun
03-16-18 03:00 PM - Post#1674649    

    In response to Loyalist Dave

Wow now I will have to google. I was thinking yam was South Pacific. That’s why I said that I don’t think I’ve ever had a true yam. We often apply misname to similar things.our elk is a European red deer, their elk is our moose, and they don’t have a moose and it’s all very confusing.

 
satx78247 
75 Cal.
Posts: 5993
03-16-18 03:08 PM - Post#1674652    

    In response to tenngun

100% CORRECT.

yours, satx


 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 13584
Colorado Clyde
03-16-18 03:46 PM - Post#1674666    

    In response to tenngun

In 1986 china produced 80% of the worlds Sweet potatoes.

The sweet potatoes arrived in china by the 1550's
Along with corn, peanuts, potatoes and tomatoes.

In the course of the 18th century the Chinese more than doubled their number, thanks in considerable part to the new resources the American food crops put at their disposal.


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7190
tenngun
03-16-18 03:58 PM - Post#1674669    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Never really investigated it, so I just looked it up to find that ‘yam’ is used for taro root, an unrelated sweet potato in Okinawa and a Japanese root, our word yam seems to come from Portuguese clipped mispronounced East African. A rose by any other name?
Did you ever read ‘Indian givers’ I don’t recall the author.

Edited by tenngun on 03-16-18 04:00 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 13584
Colorado Clyde
03-16-18 04:02 PM - Post#1674671    

    In response to tenngun

But the topic is Sweet potatoes.....I mean pasty's
I mean Sweet potato pasties.

https://youtu.be/k18_knld8Ec

https://youtu.be/wzTjsrY4J10


 
tenngun 
Cannon
Posts: 7190
tenngun
03-16-18 04:07 PM - Post#1674673    

    In response to Colorado Clyde

Looks good and you could add a little sugar cinnamon and that John Townsend spice and go sweet over savory maybe some garlic and fresh herbs and go all savory.

 
Gene L 
50 Cal.
Posts: 1265
03-16-18 10:07 PM - Post#1674722    

    In response to tenngun


If I remember correctly, sweet potatoes are a root vegetable. They are harvested and dried for a period of time. You can eat them green, fried in slices, and they're not bad. I think they have to be dried out to reduce the moisture content.

Rutabagas are much different taste from turnips, but both are good. Generally, rutabagas are sweetened (I think). They've got an earthy taste to them. They last forever if you coat them with wax, which is what they do in the supermarkets.

 
Colorado Clyde 
Cannon
Posts: 13584
Colorado Clyde
03-17-18 12:52 AM - Post#1674733    

    In response to Gene L

I'm growing sweet potato slips as we speak....This is the second time I have grown them. They are very hardy and store very well.

When they were introduced to china they grew them on the hillsides above rice paddies.

If memory serves me correct they are a member of the morning glory family.


 
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