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Steve Halford

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Canute Rex

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My old friend Steve Halford, of Wallingford Vermont, died on Saturday after a long illness.

He was an artist in many mediums, most notably raku pottery and pen & ink drawing. He could make sketches worthy of Hogarth with a bottle of ink and a sharpened wooden coffee stirrer. His raku works were exhibited in galleries. He taught art at the local high school for decades.

I met him through Rev War reenacting back in the early 80s. He started in Rev War in His Majesty's 29th Regiment, went on to be an F&I grenadier, and finished up his reenacting as a War of 1812 Inniskilling. His last reenactment was the 200th anniversary of Waterloo on the original site, where he and his crew marched miles in full kit to get there and slept in the open under a tree. He got me back into muzzle loading after a long hiatus. We spent many happy afternoons shooting and trying to figure out whether it was the sights, or us, or the load. He took up the matchlock and the wheellock.

For years he competed in the primitive biathlons around Vermont. You would have seen him in a green 17th c coat with a bandolier of powder bottles over his shoulder.

Being a natural with materials, he built his own early 18th c German matchlock target rifle and then an early 17th c French wheellock.

He was mild mannered, soft spoken, and generous. Although talented, he was humble about his talents. I never heard his voice raised in anger.

When I visited him for the last time in the hospital he knew his time was limited. He chuckled and quoted Frederick the Great's admonition to his troops. "Rascals, do you want to live forever?"

Steve will be profoundly missed by all who knew him.
 
My old friend Steve Halford, of Wallingford Vermont, died on Saturday after a long illness.

He was an artist in many mediums, most notably raku pottery and pen & ink drawing. He could make sketches worthy of Hogarth with a bottle of ink and a sharpened wooden coffee stirrer. His raku works were exhibited in galleries. He taught art at the local high school for decades.

I met him through Rev War reenacting back in the early 80s. He started in Rev War in His Majesty's 29th Regiment, went on to be an F&I grenadier, and finished up his reenacting as a War of 1812 Inniskilling. His last reenactment was the 200th anniversary of Waterloo on the original site, where he and his crew marched miles in full kit to get there and slept in the open under a tree. He got me back into muzzle loading after a long hiatus. We spent many happy afternoons shooting and trying to figure out whether it was the sights, or us, or the load. He took up the matchlock and the wheellock.

For years he competed in the primitive biathlons around Vermont. You would have seen him in a green 17th c coat with a bandolier of powder bottles over his shoulder.

Being a natural with materials, he built his own early 18th c German matchlock target rifle and then an early 17th c French wheellock.

He was mild mannered, soft spoken, and generous. Although talented, he was humble about his talents. I never heard his voice raised in anger.

When I visited him for the last time in the hospital he knew his time was limited. He chuckled and quoted Frederick the Great's admonition to his troops. "Rascals, do you want to live forever?"

Steve will be profoundly missed by all who knew him.
I'm very sorry for your loss of such a good friend. That was a bang up eulogy right there. May you two meet again amidst eternal fields and forests.
 
Thank you for posting this …

My deepest sympathies, this is indeed a huge loss, i’m so sorry you lost such a good friend, and we lost a good man. And to face the end with such humility, wow; that quote is quite fitting.

Steve was such a warm, fun and knowledgeable man and I will always CHERISH my interactions with him at the VT Biathlons. His matchlock was the 1st one I ever shot and HE hooked me onto the older and earlier arms!

No mere words can assuage the feelings of his loss … but I do hope in time that you can smile anytime you see or think about a matchlock and reminisce about our departed Brother of the Match.
 
Indeed Steve was a super nice guy. I didn't know him through reenacting but rather through a mutual friend and we had gone to a few gun shows together and it was always nice to talk and (more important) listen to what he had to say as I could tell he had a wealth of knowledge and wisdom. I just found out this morning from said mutual friend. He will be missed for sure😞
 
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