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Punch size?

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I'm pretty sure .438 is too small to seal the cylinder, balls used are. 454 or. 457. If you only want to lube barrel it might work okay.
 
7/16 works fine, they come out a bit bigger, and they fill the chambers just fine. I see bores like this every time I use them, including my Remington revolving carbine, it's almost this clean the whole length and I get a lube star at the muzzle.
 

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I was planning on using a 7/16" (.438") punch for my Dad's Remington, but I haven't tried it yet. Hopefully someone knowledgeable will let us know!
Update: I finally had an opportunity to try the 7/16" wads and they are just about perfect. I will keep doing them that way.

I also made a few 3/8" wads for my .36 and those are just a hair on the large size, but with 1/8" thick felt, they still go in a lot better than the thinner Precision Lube wads I have. The thinner wads like to turn sideways a lot - very annoying!
 
I use a 12mm punch for .44's. It is pretty tight and I often have to use the rammer to seat it but when soaked in a beeswax/olive oil mix it keeps my guns running nicely up to 18-24 rounds which is a normal session for any one of the revolvers. At 50' I'll often find the wad imprinted or embedded in the target.
 
I'm pretty sure .438 is too small to seal the cylinder, balls used are. 454 or. 457. If you only want to lube barrel it might work okay.

Does not matter that much. The wads are not any kind of a gas seal. They seem to blow apart well before leaving the barrel. You can even use ..030” to .040” and get good results.
This is one of those those things in black powder shooting that people agonize needlessly about.
Try some square or triangular shaped lubed wads under the ball and you will see what I mean.
The wad is there to hold lubricant, and nothing else.
If you insist on using “ proper sized wads “, .045” to .046 will do.
Just don’t lose any sleep over it.
 
I use a 12mm punch for .44's. It is pretty tight and I often have to use the rammer to seat it but when soaked in a beeswax/olive oil mix it keeps my guns running nicely up to 18-24 rounds which is a normal session for any one of the revolvers.
I haven't seen metric punches, 12mm should be the ticket. I rehabbed a 7/16"(11mm) headed for the dumpster at work, and bought an Osborne brand 3/8" for the 36s, a nice quality tool, way nicer than General brand. They're not cheap, but worth it.
 
I haven't seen metric punches, 12mm should be the ticket. I rehabbed a 7/16"(11mm) headed for the dumpster at work, and bought an Osborne brand 3/8" for the 36s, a nice quality tool, way nicer than General brand. They're not cheap, but worth it.
Its worth spending the money. I ordered Gedore punches on line and am very happy with the job they do and holding a good edge. I use a piece of lead as a backing. When it gets too marred up, just melt it smooth again.
 
Does not matter that much. The wads are not any kind of a gas seal. They seem to blow apart well before leaving the barrel. You can even use ..030” to .040” and get good results.
This is one of those those things in black powder shooting that people agonize needlessly about.
Try some square or triangular shaped lubed wads under the ball and you will see what I mean.
The wad is there to hold lubricant, and nothing else.
If you insist on using “ proper sized wads “, .045” to .046 will do.
Just don’t lose any sleep over it.
I got the decimal points in the wrong places.
Post should read 0.30” to .40”.
.45” to .46”.
 
I reamed out the inside diameter of the 7/16 harbor freight punch from their cheapy punch set with a stone on a dremel. I think I got it to about.460+-. Works good to tap out revolver wads.

I use the same punch for my .44s. I slightly polished the inside with a stone on a Dremel, because it was pretty rough. I used the 3/8" punch from the same set for my .36 revolvers.

After using a couple different lubes, I've settled on 100% pure neatsfoot oil to lube my wads. It keeps powder fouling soft and I don't have to mess with mixing or melting anything.
 
Actually all the wad does is supposed to do is supply lubricant to keep fouling soft but not to seal the chamber.
If (BIG IF) there is a small ring of lead cut when loading the ball the chamber mouth is sealed.
If (another BIG IF) caps fit tightly on the firing cone sealing them tfom cap flash he dreaded chain fire is rare.
BUT if the caps are "Pinched" to fit or the ball is not a tight fit in the chamber all bets for chain fire are off.
Sacrifice one cap in dim light and be surprised at the fire ball round the recoil shield.
The Remington #10 and CCI #11 caps are interesting. The RWS 1075 is scary.
And there is the usual source of a chain fire.
Respectfully submitted
Bunk
Resident Curmudgeon
 

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