one more from scrapforging

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Black Hand

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necchi said:
Why not do just a little bit more finish work?
Is it supposed to look more "olde timey"?
The "Olde timey" look seems to be THE thing right now. Personally and from period examples I've seen, I'm certain no smith would put out a blade that looks like many available today...
 

zimmerstutzen

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I had an original curved tip "skinner" type knife. Frankly, it was in rough shape, but I did sharpen it and it held a edge very well. For all it's roughness, pitted surface and century of neglect, it was still much more refined. The blade was at most a 1/16th of an inch thick along the back. That said, I am envious of the skill necessary to turn out any usable cutting tool. I also had a very old camp knife that was a gift from a old gent whose family were plume hunters in the Everglades. That blade was amazingly hard and tough. It was thinner along the back of the knife and twice as thick up the middle of the blade. It cut well and chopped like a hatchet. I even cut nails with it and made no noticeable nicks on the edge. Wish I could replicate that knife.
 

BillinOregon

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There is a school of knife making out there known as "tribal" or "neotribal." These blades remind me of some I saw in Africa. I agree there is a real satisfaction in turning found steel into something useful -- although my efforts typically go to fireplace pokers and such that require little skill (I don't have any) to be made to do their job.
As Rick said, thanks for sharing -- and you do indeed need only please yourself!
 

R.C.BINGAMAN

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Way to go horner, I often wonder what the frontier settler, farmer, hunter what ever guy would of carried, you need it you make it, it works ok I am satisfied with it. It is my work and I like it. To often fellow craftsmen are put off by negative comments. To the maker I say this stick with it you will be impressed with your progress as you continue. I would carry one of your blades. AN APPALICHIAN HUNTER
 

Black Hand

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R.C.Bingaman said:
I often wonder what the frontier settler, farmer, hunter what ever guy would of carried....
One of the tens of thousands of trade knives imported by the barrel-full from Europe each year and available everywhere. English and French knives were common and came in many shapes and sizes.

R.C.Bingaman said:
...you need it you make it...
This is a very romantic notion and not very accurate.

Other than a blacksmith with all the tools & a forge, 99.999999999% of the population couldn't forge a knife if their life depended on it - they just had NO idea how to do it. We live in an era where all the information we might need to do nearly anything is available at our fingertips - this WAS NOT the case then. Iron was available while steel was scarce and very expensive. The Colonies imported much of their steel from Europe, as the local iron/steel industry was not very well developed.
 

Black Hand

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What I see above are 4 blades with the potential to become excellent knives...

These are the first 3 knives I ever forged (all the other knives I've made were by stock removal):

Click on the image for a larger view
Forged to (almost) final shape, refined with a file, quenched in oil and tempered in the oven.
 

Black Hand

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I subsequently forged 2 more - they wanted blades representative of trade knives during the Fur Trade and with diamond-shaped handles.
These are 2 images of the same knife from both sides:

Click on the image for the full picture
 

Black Hand

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Except for the friction folder with the horn handle, all were made from random pieces of Farrier's rasp that were give to me. The folder was made from a Stihl flat chainsaw sharpening file.
 

R.C.BINGAMAN

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I agree with your statements and fully understand the iron and steel situation of the accepted period in which our discussions surround. Also recognize the fact of the trade in knives during the colonial period, as well as all sorts of items. I also come from a mind set of if you need it and you can not get it you make it. If it is un-satisfactory the first attempt you re-do it. Not the period of which we refer to, As I had in years past observed my grand father forge items or repair equipment requiring rudimentary smithing skills as a farmer. I have a small forge and a few of his tools used in the endeavors. I never look down a long nose at anyone's efforts In the pursuit of learning. Knowledge is learned not ridiculed as some prior posts referred in a covert manner. Thank you for your knowledge and willingness to pass along information.AN APPALICHIAN HUNTER.
 

Rifleman1776

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Looks good from here. And it is a one of a kind personalized item. For myself, I would want a small cross guard on the bottom to prevent fingers from sliding forward, especially when dressing game.
 
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