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November Trek (Photo Heavy)

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A few stills from a November trek I thought I'd share. I've been really focusing the past few years on updating and correcting my equipment to become more historically accurate. I hiked a total of 12 miles during this outing, in period gear. It was a lot of fun and a great learning experience.
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The viddy came up on my suggestions on YT. Watched it yesterday. Really enjoyed it Great job👍
But…..beard😒
If the beard is the worst part, I'll take it, LOL. Appreciate you watching and buggin' me about the beard. Maybe someday I'll get rid of it.
Well done Ethan, thank you for sharing
I too wear a full beard and short hair and I’m not willing to shave for the sake of PC.
I’d look like Gallagher if I went full pc.
I'm in a similar boat, haven't seen what's under in a long time, and a little nervous to go clippin' now haha.
 
A few stills from a November trek I thought I'd share. I've been really focusing the past few years on updating and correcting my equipment to become more historically accurate. I hiked a total of 12 miles during this outing, in period gear. It was a lot of fun and a great learning experience.
View attachment 272368View attachment 272369View attachment 272372View attachment 272373View attachment 272376View attachment 272378
Nice pictures. I'm glad you enjoyed your time.

was a lot of fun and a great learning experience.

So? What are the lessons learned?
Things you would do differently?
 
Nice pictures. I'm glad you enjoyed your time.



So? What are the lessons learned?
Things you would do differently?
I imagine it will sound silly to guys with years on me, but here goes! Really, there's not much different from modern gear if you did a similar "ultralight" outing or hunt. Not trying at all to overdramatize here, I know it was only a night. Just sharing what I'm taking to the next outing.

Much of my time in these shoes has been a learning experience, I've found that consciously going slow at the start of each outing in them allows me to feel the terrain and get up to speed. After an hour or so I'm back on track and walking just about at the same pace as I do in modern shoes. I think I've said it a lot, but in some ways moving in these shoes is like using cross-country skis. Conscious movements pay dividends and don't wear me out.

Food is crucial, at least it was to me. I'm not a big guy but the 8 miles I put in made me hungry. The day and evening were fine but I couldn't believe how much my stomach hurt for more food at night. I chomped on some dry biscuits and that helped a ton. I think munching every few hours is important for sustainment over a longer period of time. The level of hunger I felt was akin to the days I've worked construction or built fences if that gives you some context. The amount of work you put in can be adjusted of course.

I took a 1 gallon brass "trade kettle" and it was really overkill for a one man outing. To do something like this again I'd just bring my tin cup. I wouldn't be able to do coffee and oatmeal at the same time, but I found in the cold of the morning I wasn't moving too fast anyway. In the future I might track down a 1/2 gal tin kettle.

The temperature only fluctuated about 20 degrees, from 60s to 39-40, but it didn't feel like the same 40 in modern gear. There wasn't any rain, but boy a lot of moisture. After midnight everything was damp, then by 2am the damp got cold, my face was out of my blanket for much of the night and when that cold rolled around, it was NIPPY as we say around here.

The moisture affected everything, my shoes, my blankets, me. All the dry tinder I gathered in the day was damp. I'll always cover my tinder in the future or put it away in a sack. Along with this, I thought I could skate by not changing socks at night but that was a mistake. I could have toughed it out by getting closer to the fire, but it's much easier and documented to change into your night socks. A pair of "camp" moccasins would have helped to keep the moisture and cold out of my feet.

I didn't take a shelter, as many documents mention outings without them. I didn't really miss it and the weight savings were nice on my back. I think a cover would have helped keep the moisture off me and my gear though, and might have held in some heat. I really like the pack set up with two blankets, but I need to work on how I use them at night. I slept in them like a sleeping bag most of the night with two halves underneath and two halves on top of me. It worked, but I think and I've been told there are better ways to wrap them to keep ya warm. If you had a good fire and reflection, I think you could do much colder temps with two blankets and survive if you were smart. I hope to try it in the future.

I didn't want to use any leaves to insulate or pad my bedding for fear of ticks in these parts. All my gear was permathyned and I never found a single tick during or after the outing.

I had plenty of firewood, but I should have prioritized some larger branches for the overnight. As shown in my video, I fought my fire all night. More wood in the 4-6" diameter range would have helped.

I used just under 8L of water while I was out. Like I said, it wasn't hot but I found myself drafting pretty hard to catch up after hiking. I could have slowed this, but had it and figured I may as well drink it.

It's been a while since I've been able to get out like this, so much of it was 're-learning' for me, but I'm excited to keep making time to dive in deeper. I've got plans in the works to go out for longer and less equipment and do my best to improve.

Happy to answer any questions anyone has,
Ethan
 
I imagine it will sound silly to guys with years on me, but here goes! Really, there's not much different from modern gear if you did a similar "ultralight" outing or hunt. Not trying at all to overdramatize here, I know it was only a night. Just sharing what I'm taking to the next outing.

Much of my time in these shoes has been a learning experience, I've found that consciously going slow at the start of each outing in them allows me to feel the terrain and get up to speed. After an hour or so I'm back on track and walking just about at the same pace as I do in modern shoes. I think I've said it a lot, but in some ways moving in these shoes is like using cross-country skis. Conscious movements pay dividends and don't wear me out.

Food is crucial, at least it was to me. I'm not a big guy but the 8 miles I put in made me hungry. The day and evening were fine but I couldn't believe how much my stomach hurt for more food at night. I chomped on some dry biscuits and that helped a ton. I think munching every few hours is important for sustainment over a longer period of time. The level of hunger I felt was akin to the days I've worked construction or built fences if that gives you some context. The amount of work you put in can be adjusted of course.

I took a 1 gallon brass "trade kettle" and it was really overkill for a one man outing. To do something like this again I'd just bring my tin cup. I wouldn't be able to do coffee and oatmeal at the same time, but I found in the cold of the morning I wasn't moving too fast anyway. In the future I might track down a 1/2 gal tin kettle.

The temperature only fluctuated about 20 degrees, from 60s to 39-40, but it didn't feel like the same 40 in modern gear. There wasn't any rain, but boy a lot of moisture. After midnight everything was damp, then by 2am the damp got cold, my face was out of my blanket for much of the night and when that cold rolled around, it was NIPPY as we say around here.

The moisture affected everything, my shoes, my blankets, me. All the dry tinder I gathered in the day was damp. I'll always cover my tinder in the future or put it away in a sack. Along with this, I thought I could skate by not changing socks at night but that was a mistake. I could have toughed it out by getting closer to the fire, but it's much easier and documented to change into your night socks. A pair of "camp" moccasins would have helped to keep the moisture and cold out of my feet.

I didn't take a shelter, as many documents mention outings without them. I didn't really miss it and the weight savings were nice on my back. I think a cover would have helped keep the moisture off me and my gear though, and might have held in some heat. I really like the pack set up with two blankets, but I need to work on how I use them at night. I slept in them like a sleeping bag most of the night with two halves underneath and two halves on top of me. It worked, but I think and I've been told there are better ways to wrap them to keep ya warm. If you had a good fire and reflection, I think you could do much colder temps with two blankets and survive if you were smart. I hope to try it in the future.

I didn't want to use any leaves to insulate or pad my bedding for fear of ticks in these parts. All my gear was permathyned and I never found a single tick during or after the outing.

I had plenty of firewood, but I should have prioritized some larger branches for the overnight. As shown in my video, I fought my fire all night. More wood in the 4-6" diameter range would have helped.

I used just under 8L of water while I was out. Like I said, it wasn't hot but I found myself drafting pretty hard to catch up after hiking. I could have slowed this, but had it and figured I may as well drink it.

It's been a while since I've been able to get out like this, so much of it was 're-learning' for me, but I'm excited to keep making time to dive in deeper. I've got plans in the works to go out for longer and less equipment and do my best to improve.

Happy to answer any questions anyone has,
Ethan
Absolutely fantastic answer. Really great.
I've made many of the same observations. I too make a conscious effort to slow down in period footwear, be it moccasins or trekker boots, but I also try to maintain that conscious effort and not "get used to," the different footwear and work up to my modern pace. Two reasons, first being it seems to be counter to the point of doing this for me, and second, it isn't modern footwear and when I get complacent/overconfident and speed up,,, I usually am reminded of its limitations the hard way.
I like your comparison to cross-country skis.

I bring two tin cups, one is quite large, the other pretty standard. It allows me to boil water in the big one pour it in the small one for coffee or tea or instant soup, and then boil something else and drink/consume it from the large one.

Did you "full" your blankets (I'm assuming they are 100% wool or super close to it)?

I'm saving your answer to use as reminders to myself, great job.
 
I imagine it will sound silly to guys with years on me, but here goes! Really, there's not much different from modern gear if you did a similar "ultralight" outing or hunt. Not trying at all to overdramatize here, I know it was only a night. Just sharing what I'm taking to the next outing.

Much of my time in these shoes has been a learning experience, I've found that consciously going slow at the start of each outing in them allows me to feel the terrain and get up to speed. After an hour or so I'm back on track and walking just about at the same pace as I do in modern shoes. I think I've said it a lot, but in some ways moving in these shoes is like using cross-country skis. Conscious movements pay dividends and don't wear me out.

Food is crucial, at least it was to me. I'm not a big guy but the 8 miles I put in made me hungry. The day and evening were fine but I couldn't believe how much my stomach hurt for more food at night. I chomped on some dry biscuits and that helped a ton. I think munching every few hours is important for sustainment over a longer period of time. The level of hunger I felt was akin to the days I've worked construction or built fences if that gives you some context. The amount of work you put in can be adjusted of course.

I took a 1 gallon brass "trade kettle" and it was really overkill for a one man outing. To do something like this again I'd just bring my tin cup. I wouldn't be able to do coffee and oatmeal at the same time, but I found in the cold of the morning I wasn't moving too fast anyway. In the future I might track down a 1/2 gal tin kettle.

The temperature only fluctuated about 20 degrees, from 60s to 39-40, but it didn't feel like the same 40 in modern gear. There wasn't any rain, but boy a lot of moisture. After midnight everything was damp, then by 2am the damp got cold, my face was out of my blanket for much of the night and when that cold rolled around, it was NIPPY as we say around here.

The moisture affected everything, my shoes, my blankets, me. All the dry tinder I gathered in the day was damp. I'll always cover my tinder in the future or put it away in a sack. Along with this, I thought I could skate by not changing socks at night but that was a mistake. I could have toughed it out by getting closer to the fire, but it's much easier and documented to change into your night socks. A pair of "camp" moccasins would have helped to keep the moisture and cold out of my feet.

I didn't take a shelter, as many documents mention outings without them. I didn't really miss it and the weight savings were nice on my back. I think a cover would have helped keep the moisture off me and my gear though, and might have held in some heat. I really like the pack set up with two blankets, but I need to work on how I use them at night. I slept in them like a sleeping bag most of the night with two halves underneath and two halves on top of me. It worked, but I think and I've been told there are better ways to wrap them to keep ya warm. If you had a good fire and reflection, I think you could do much colder temps with two blankets and survive if you were smart. I hope to try it in the future.

I didn't want to use any leaves to insulate or pad my bedding for fear of ticks in these parts. All my gear was permathyned and I never found a single tick during or after the outing.

I had plenty of firewood, but I should have prioritized some larger branches for the overnight. As shown in my video, I fought my fire all night. More wood in the 4-6" diameter range would have helped.

I used just under 8L of water while I was out. Like I said, it wasn't hot but I found myself drafting pretty hard to catch up after hiking. I could have slowed this, but had it and figured I may as well drink it.

It's been a while since I've been able to get out like this, so much of it was 're-learning' for me, but I'm excited to keep making time to dive in deeper. I've got plans in the works to go out for longer and less equipment and do my best to improve.

Happy to answer any questions anyone has,
Ethan
Lots of good observations and information here!
 
I bring two tin cups, one is quite large, the other pretty standard. It allows me to boil water in the big one pour it in the small one for coffee or tea or instant soup, and then boil something else and drink/consume it from the large one.

Did you "full" your blankets (I'm assuming they are 100% wool or super close to it)?
Really like the idea of two cups! Thank you for sharing.

I'm not familiar with the term "full", both my blankets are 100% wool though. One is commercial, one is hand woven.
 
That was really enjoyable to read and see. Thanks for sharing that. May have to try something like that myself.
 
To "full" a wool blanket or wool fabric is the same as "felting" in process for the most part. Felting is done with raw fiber, fulling is done after the fiber is woven. Essentially it is purposefully shrinkage, or tightening of the weave by shrinking the fibers lengthwise but also taking advantage of the microscopic scales on wool fiber so that the fiber pumps up and entangled the scales with those of the fibers next to it....
This is a really horrible layman's explanation. There is much written on the process as well as some videos out there. It has been discussed in the reenacting sections of this forum in the past.

The agitation when washing is a bigger key than the shrinkage from heat. A well fulled piece of wool will shed quite a bit of moisture, and a lot of wind.
 
I have a canvas bed roll I use in damp conditions..
It’s just two pieces of canvas with tie straps attached along the two long sides and across the bottom..
Lay one out flat, put your blankets on it .
Then lay the second piece of canvas over that and tie the straps..
Your blankets will stay dry inside the tied together bag….
Mine are tied loosely, so no condensation inside the canvas bag..

Always clean , dry socks at night and a sleeping cap..👍
 
That was really enjoyable to read and see. Thanks for sharing that. May have to try something like that myself.
Thanks Silky! Please do and let us know how you like it.
Can you post the video link?
The shorter version (10 mins) can be found here - https://youtu.be/3FxTa5wl7w0 . Later I made a 45 minute version with more explanation of my gear and more silent hiking here -

The shorter "24 Hours" video was targeted more at an audience outside muzzleloading and living history, where the longer version is made more for folks looking to dive a little deeper or simply stick around longer.
To "full" a wool blanket or wool fabric is the same as "felting" in process for the most part. Felting is done with raw fiber, fulling is done after the fiber is woven. Essentially it is purposefully shrinkage, or tightening of the weave by shrinking the fibers lengthwise but also taking advantage of the microscopic scales on wool fiber so that the fiber pumps up and entangled the scales with those of the fibers next to it....
This is a really horrible layman's explanation. There is much written on the process as well as some videos out there. It has been discussed in the reenacting sections of this forum in the past.

The agitation when washing is a bigger key than the shrinkage from heat. A well fulled piece of wool will shed quite a bit of moisture, and a lot of wind.
Fascinating! Thank you! I raised icelandic sheep for some time and have a basic understanding of wool but I'm always amazed at it's utility and how it can change based on how it is worked. Perhaps I can try this on my blankets.
Very well done, Ethan. Nice read and some nice pics.
Thank you kindly, it means a lot!
 

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