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Kibler's Hunting Pouch

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Please read post# 79 , because I suspect you did not.
You get what you pay for? There's always a cheaper option. I received the email announcing the new bags as well. It never mentions entry level if I'm not mistaken. Buy the traditions kit and do a great job on it. You still have a Traditions kit gun with little or no appreciation in value. And the gun has and will win matches.
 
Back to the meat of the thread....
Here are two kit prototype bags made by my daughter who had only made a keyring and wallet prior to making these. Of course she had hands on instruction by me (which I do offer in my shop here in VA).
The pattern is the same and she made the flat sewn version ans the turned bag version plus her own embellishments. She is also a natural at coloring leather.
 

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Good sir, you know how in this hobby, there are always snarky m-er effers who have to complain or criticize. Keep on doing what you do. You’ve made a great difference in the hobby.
I agree, I am not going to buy the kit but instead I am saving for the smoothbore when it is released from the Kibler arsenal. So I am still supportive of small business I assume.
 
Back to the meat of the thread....
Here are two kit prototype bags made by my daughter who had only made a keyring and wallet prior to making these. Of course she had hands on instruction by me (which I do offer in my shop here in VA).
The pattern is the same and she made the flat sewn version ans the turned bag version plus her own embellishments. She is also a natural at coloring leather.
Both are very nice. I like the turned look myself.
 
Good sir, you know how in this hobby, there are always snarky m-er effers who have to complain or criticize. Keep on doing what you do. You’ve made a great difference in the hobby.
You got that right! It's a terrible thing as many new folks see it and decide to move along. Completely ruins them.
 
It is quite easy to make a pattern for a bag you want from a file folder. Fold it in half lengthways.
Then the smaller half is for the flap. There are usually three creases in what was the bottom of the folder. Use these to mark where the flap is and the body of the bag is. Then use scissors to cut your bag pattern.
Take this pattern, lay it on the leather and then cut it out.
That is the back as the flap and the body are one piece.
Now use the pattern as the front panel of the bag.
Draw a mark on the leather as to where the top of the front panel is. Then draw this line across from mark to mark. This is the top of the front panel. Now draw around the edge of the bottom of your pattern. This is the body of the front panel.
Now you can begin to see the two pieces together. If you want a lining see it in.
You sew the pieces inside to inside.
Then when you are done seeing the bag. Wet it until it is soaked rather well.
Then turn the bag inside out.
Your bag will now be the right sides out.
Strap can be seen on the corners of the bag. You might wish to scallop the edge of the front panel. To ease getting into the bag. But do it a little bit at a time.

Before you sew the straps on. Let the bag dry. Check it frequently so it retains the shape you want.

After it is dry it will be stiff. Simply break it down by bending it and folding this will return the leather to its pliable condition.

You can dye it. If you have walnut dye. Plunge ur into the walnut dye and jet it set for some time. Then. Hang outside to dry. The longer you hang it and the sun hits it the darker it will become.
You can also dye it before you see and if you use commercial dyes this is better to dye before you sew.
 
Back to the meat of the thread....
Here are two Kibler hunting bag kit prototype bags made by my daughter who had only made a keyring and wallet prior to making these. Of course she had hands on instruction by me (which I do offer in my shop here in VA).
The pattern is the same and she made the flat sewn version ans the turned bag version plus her own embellishments. She is also a natural at coloring leather.
 

Attachments

  • 20231119_215555.jpg
    20231119_215555.jpg
    2.3 MB · Views: 0
  • 20231119_215617.jpg
    20231119_215617.jpg
    2.5 MB · Views: 0
It is quite easy to make a pattern for a bag you want from a file folder. Fold it in half lengthways.
Then the smaller half is for the flap. There are usually three creases in what was the bottom of the folder. Use these to mark where the flap is and the body of the bag is. Then use scissors to cut your bag pattern.
Take this pattern, lay it on the leather and then cut it out.
That is the back as the flap and the body are one piece.
Now use the pattern as the front panel of the bag.
Draw a mark on the leather as to where the top of the front panel is. Then draw this line across from mark to mark. This is the top of the front panel. Now draw around the edge of the bottom of your pattern. This is the body of the front panel.
Now you can begin to see the two pieces together. If you want a lining see it in.
You sew the pieces inside to inside.
Then when you are done seeing the bag. Wet it until it is soaked rather well.
Then turn the bag inside out.
Your bag will now be the right sides out.
Strap can be seen on the corners of the bag. You might wish to scallop the edge of the front panel. To ease getting into the bag. But do it a little bit at a time.

Before you sew the straps on. Let the bag dry. Check it frequently so it retains the shape you want.

After it is dry it will be stiff. Simply break it down by bending it and folding this will return the leather to its pliable condition.

You can dye it. If you have walnut dye. Plunge ur into the walnut dye and jet it set for some time. Then. Hang outside to dry. The longer you hang it and the sun hits it the darker it will become.
You can also dye it before you see and if you use commercial dyes this is better to dye before you sew.
Maybe start your own thread?


No s__t one can make their own pattern.

Some people may not have the confidence to try. Like I said earlier this kit allows them to concentrate on learning the sitching part and the parts could even be used to create future patterns.
 
I got an email. PM yer address and will fwd if your interested. Maybe gotta be a customer to get on the mail list? Or at least sign up?

And ya all you haters....I wish I had kept my pie hole shut. BUT I cant stand that degree of disrespect. Months back a guy had a Traditions KY kit (in plastic sleeve) listed for $350.00 plus shipping (or right about there). I had just bought one to practice on before I stain my Kibler so I was aware it was posted at MORE THAN NEW from a vendor (site supporter). I did send the guy a PM to that effect but would never have used his thread to direct traffic away from his attempt to sell an item. He never sold it to my knowledge. If The Kibler bag kits are overpriced they too will fizzle. but that's not my business. He seemed to price the rifle kits where those that were looking for that item could afford them and he could make a dollar?
 
Back to the meat of the thread....
Here are two kit prototype bags made by my daughter who had only made a keyring and wallet prior to making these. Of course she had hands on instruction by me (which I do offer in my shop here in VA).
The pattern is the same and she made the flat sewn version ans the turned bag version plus her own embellishments. She is also a natural at coloring leather.
Your daughter did good. You must have taught her well.
 
I would maybe buy a Kibler (or other) leather kit for a stiff gun case to fit my SMR. Had a nice one stole with my Mosberg 500 once and MISS IT To this day! That was 43 years ago.
 
Back to the meat of the thread....
Here are two Kibler hunting bag kit prototype bags made by my daughter who had only made a keyring and wallet prior to making these. Of course she had hands on instruction by me (which I do offer in my shop here in VA).
The pattern is the same and she made the flat sewn version ans the turned bag version plus her own embellishments. She is also a natural at coloring leather.

I really like what she did with the flap on the left (flat sewn). What tool did she use?
Maybe start your own thread?
Thought the same. We have a crafting forum for just that. It may have been done before but I don't recall it. A comprehensive how to build along of a basic shooting bag would be useful and inspirational.
 
There is not 155 dollars worth of value in that kit.

Mr. Kibler is a true genius and a visionary who puts out top shelf firearm kits.

Stick to selling great gun kits. Not leather bag kits.

.02
with all due respect, i disagree. I've built a number of bags for myself, and over the years, i've collected what i think is a pretty modest collection of leatherworking tools along the way. If you get all the gear that's shown in the photos, and you count in the value of the leather, i'd posit that you are at or very close to a pretty fair bargain.

Some other thoughts:
- if all you want is one bag, and you don't care whether you make it or it's made by someone else, then this might not be the deal for you. For me, a good bit of the fun is making it yourself, so if (when, rather) another bag needs built, i'll scamper about and scrounge some leather from my daughter and get to stitching and swearing. -- but that's just me.

if you anticipate making several bags, you might want to go the route of the first one being a kit of this sort, and then you will have the experience and confidence to tackle something more 'scratch built.'

- if you choose that route, i would get T.C. Albert's book - here's a link ...
https://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/PartDetail.aspx/39/1/BOOK-R18-CHPwith this book, and a few simple tools (as yoyu see in the Kibler kit) you should be able to tackle a wide variety of belt making projects.

go with what works for you, and don't get too wrapped around the axle about whatever "they" say.

just my two cents...
 
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