Kibler Kit help

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EC121

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The in-letting on my Colonial was very good - but not flawless.
The lock mounting bolts lined up perfectly with the holes drilled through the stock, but there was over a 1/32" gap behind the barrel and behind the tang. Filled in with some wood putty. Maybe somebody didn't get the stock correctly mounted in the machining fixture for that procedure. Still have a ways to go in my finishing effort - hope the putty stains OK. On the plus side, some of the processes detailed in the Kibler assembly videos are now completed before the kit ships. Overall, still very pleased with the kit.
I had a gap behind the barrel on rifle(not a Kibler) I was building. I glued a piece of popsicle stick in the breech end of the barrel channel and inlet the barrel breech. By the time I shaped and stained the stock. It looked normal.
 

Hatchet-Jack

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I wouldn't say it just snaps together but most of the inletting is done, just needs some minor work.

I used a Bastard Mill file with chalk to draw file my barrel. Some say you don't need to but I could see machine marks so I milled mine as Jim does. I also used finer grit sand paper on the metal. 220, 320, 400, 500 and some Emery cloth and strop to polish the lock parts.

I had to bend the breech plug tang a bit.

A half round file for the metal work is very helpful.

A vise with the jaws lined with leather and an adjustable post stand is a must have.

The butt plate will require some inletting. The trigger guard may need to be bent to align with the inletting.

IMG_20210417_105729.jpg


I posted a build along for my SMR here:

 
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troy2000

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I bought a Kibler .40 SMR kit a while back. It was my first build (or maybe I should say 'assembly'? ;)), but there might be something helpful for you in my build thread anyway.

 

troy2000

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When viewing Kibler's videos, I notice that the screw drivers he uses are hardware store variety. With the exception of the lock bolts, the butt plate screws are standard unplated wood screws, which have a wedge fit slot. When I assemble mine, I use another set from the hardware store that i don't care if i bugger up.
I think Jim Kibler gets away with using tapered hardware store-type screwdrivers because he has a soft touch and years of experience. Unless the original poster is another Jim, I definitely second the suggestion that he should get a set of flat-ground ('gunsmithing' type) screwdrivers.
 

Vaino

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When I wander through hardware stores or depts, I'm always on the lookout for cheap, wooden handled screwdrivers which are then hollow ground to fit the slots of the screws presently being used. I've got perhaps 50 screwdrivers and most are the reground "cheapies". Although cheap, have never found a soft steeled one. The hollow ground tip doesn't "bugger up" the slots because the bottom of the slot is used. The thinnest tipped screwdriver is for the narrow slotted hammer/ cock retaining screws and have used the same screwdriver for 35 years.

Care must be used so the screwdriver tip isn't annealed while grinding and a few dunks in water are req'd. . The tip is at 90 degrees to the grinding wheel surface and is placed high up on the wheel and the handle end is nearly touching the rest which determines how much hollow grind is achieved.

For tightening the flint clamping screw, I no longer use a screwdriver....a hex is filed on the screw head and is barely visisble and the hex wrench leaves no marks. The only drawback is that too much force can be applied w/ a hex wrench and stripping the threads is possible.....although I've never done so.

Why the wooden handles? More rustic or "old timey", I guess.....Fred
 

appalichian hunter

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Maybe a bit off the discussion, but here it goes when I attended Smith and Wesson armorers school the very first lesson was altering regular flat bladed screw drivers too properly fit the revolvers screws, with a file and nothing else. Since then I have also bought a good set of hollow ground screw drivers but most often find myself going too the hand filed ones. Also do not care for the sets with inter changeable bits.
 

Daveboone

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The in-letting on my Colonial was very good - but not flawless.
The lock mounting bolts lined up perfectly with the holes drilled through the stock, but there was over a 1/32" gap behind the barrel and behind the tang. Filled in with some wood putty. Maybe somebody didn't get the stock correctly mounted in the machining fixture for that procedure. Still have a ways to go in my finishing effort - hope the putty stains OK. On the plus side, some of the processes detailed in the Kibler assembly videos are now completed before the kit ships. Overall, still very pleased with the kit.
Today I settled down to start on my newly arrived Colonial. I had watched his video for the first few steps and had all my tools gathered. Progressing slow and carefully, I was pleased with my initial setting of the barrel and trigger plate. Then after tightening down the tang screw, I also found that I had an approx. 1/32 or so gap. NOT happy, and I know for sure I didnt inlet the tang face or breech face more than a whisker.
Gonna ponder this a bit.
 

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