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Comparing an American made fusil from the Revolutionary period and a Liege Brown Bess

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Location
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I got this Libertas marked American fusil in the mail yesterday and am dying to get the rust cleaned up. At first I thought it had a British lock but the Galton engraving is far too crude. Too wide an engraving tool. It has Libertas engraved under a rough crown made with dots, no idea why. Thought you all might enough seeing a rare American made gun. Only part I am not certain is American is the barrel. It is 20 ga or .62 caliber and with the two sets of wedding bands is likely an early fusil de chasse barrel ca late 1600s. The rest is all American ca 1770s. The side plate is cool. They evidently didn't have thick enough brass on hand so it is a real thin piece of brass, probably from an old trade kettle, which is riveted to a piece of iron with copper rivets.
 

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Hi,
Nice find! I agree it is likely some sort of American carbine or fusil. The lock is very curious. I am not aware of any locks just signed "Galton". Prior to 1773 it was "Farmer and Galton" and after 1774 it was "Galton and Son". The lock looks to have been made with a detachable pan and bolster. It also has a short sear spring, something common on European locks but not on British guns until the mid 1770s. I wonder if the lock has an internal bridle for the tumbler? I think the trigger guard may be from a British light dragoon carbine from the 1770s. Very interesting gun.

dave
 
Hi,
Nice find! I agree it is likely some sort of American carbine or fusil. The lock is very curious. I am not aware of any locks just signed "Galton". Prior to 1773 it was "Farmer and Galton" and after 1774 it was "Galton and Son". The lock looks to have been made with a detachable pan and bolster. It also has a short sear spring, something common on European locks but not on British guns until the mid 1770s. I wonder if the lock has an internal bridle for the tumbler? I think the trigger guard may be from a British light dragoon carbine from the 1770s. Very interesting gun.

dave
Hi Dave,
Thanks for your reply. The lock is actually American. The Galton mark is fake. Far too thick an engraving tool. It looks sloppy. It does have an internal bridle and is in the British style, but crude. The trigger guard with that narrow hazel nut is very similar to an American made one in Battle Weapons of the American Revolution.
Regards
Sam
 

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Last edited:
The barrel is not from a fusil de chasse.
You're right, I believe it's American. It's so rough finished I have trouble believing even a European trade gun would have a barrel like this with no markings whatsoever. Very rough filling work below the wood line and you can clearly see the seam where it was folded and forged together
 

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It cleaned up nicely. The stock is not walnut. Could be cherry. The iron band is original. There is no finish or aging under the band. What I think happened is that the gunsmith didn't have a long enough drill bit for a full length musket so they had to cut it at the juncture where the ramrod channel goes under the surface. The channel is then visible at the barrel channel so they may not have even had a long drill bit.
 

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